Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Talent Development: Do We Need HR Departments?

Talent Development:  Do We Need HR Departments? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

If HR doesn’t deliver some unique benefits then outsourcing it makes a lot of business sense.


Other companies, however, have invested in the ‘people function’. They realize that they need people who ensure that the company finds, recruits, retains and develops its people. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author's provocative article has stimulated 1000+ comments in just a few days.  How HR is viewed is also a reflection or microcosm of the clarity and integrated condition of the company's mission, vision, performance approach and culture of valuing (or not valuing) people.

From the commentary on this piece, 'before we talk about all the strategic HR staff, no one will listen or care unless you pay them right."   I find this to be true in my own work with performance management over the years.

Good structure, fair compensation, and HR not overstepping its bounds providing performance management "advice" is important.  


~ Deb

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Board Members and the Trouble With Stock Compensation & Social Responsibility

Board Members and the Trouble With Stock Compensation & Social Responsibility | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Could board pay be contributing to corporate actions that brought about BP’s Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the 2008 financial crisis?"


Paying outside board members with equity grants is becoming increasingly popular. Unfortunately, new research suggests that it leads to companies with less socially responsible behavior. This investigation comes at a time of public outcry over business actions that have had a negative impact on societal and environmental interests, including BP’s oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and the 2008 financial crisis.


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"...director stock compensation in a given year exhibited higher financial performance in later years [and] lower levels of responsibility to communities"...

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Research into social performance ratings and director compensation data for more than 1,100 U.S. public companies between 1998 and 2006 showed that while companies with high levels of outside director stock compensation in a given year exhibited higher financial performance in later years, “they also showed lower levels of responsibility to communities as measured by their charitable giving, relations with indigenous peoples, community employment and economic development, and support for basic public services,” write Yuval Deutsch and Mike Valente (both of Schulich School of Business, York University). 

  
A similar effect was evident with environmental performance and with human rights measures.

   

The findings suggest that paying outside directors with stock incentivizes them to ignore other stakeholders.


Via The Learning Factor
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Problems with compensation create a whole range of unintended consequences, even disasters.  This view of executive and board leadership pay is worth a look from an ethical, values based perspective as well as a monetary one.  ~  Deb

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:30 PM

Does paying outside board members with equity grants lead to less socially responsible behavior?

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Actions Speak Loudly: Corporate Values that Mean Nothing

Actions Speak Loudly:  Corporate Values that Mean Nothing | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"What does your company stand for? Go ahead, look around you; check out the published mission or values statement. Take a moment to read it. Now do a gut check.  ... Did you disdainfully roll your eyes?"


Here’s a thought: what if every time leaders did something counter to their company’s values, their noses grew? Like the famed puppet Pinocchio, ...when a misguided decision was flying in the face of what your company stands for?


Whimsical, yes, but wouldn’t it be effective? The offenders would be immediately called out to account for their actions.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Often truth telling, calling espoused values to consciousness when bossism and "rank and yank"  (forced distribution of performance reviews), poor management skills, and other bossisms  emerge is a risky business, especially in non-profits, known for low investments in leader and manager performance development.


Dilbert actually has done one, if not more "nose growing" comic strips dealing with the misalignment of values and management / leader actions.    

Who's courageous enough to call these out?   Does it happen in your organization?   ~  Deb

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SuccessFactors Reviews

SuccessFactors Reviews | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

SuccessFactors, an HR software firm has been purchased by software giant SAP in 2013.  Via the Glassdoor reviews, it doesn't seem the merger is going so well in 2013 internally, though externally, all seems fine.   This "things are fine" stste is being reported via bloggers attending Success Factors presentations at conference, with non-disclosure agreements in tow.
 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In a companion ScoopIt, SAP has not "messed up" Success Factors  (an HR system automation company)...at least, not yet.  This series of employer reviews on Glassdoor by new and current SuccessFactors employees (now working for SAP) is a cause for pause.     


Not using your own products, like Success Factors for their own HR, would be one sign that the merger is more about selling and less about quality and alignment with company values, for which they do tout quite a few via company slogans about transparency and "don't leave our wounded behind."  

A sample of different 2013 current employee reviews includes:  

  • "Hypocrite culture," 
   
  • "The company has grown so fast," 
   
  • "This is a culture of lies, fear and manipulation," 


and,


  • "Telling workers to get out if they raise issues which they feel should be addressed is not rational."


                                                                                  - Deb



 

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