Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Ditching performance reviews for annual conversations that really work

Ditching performance reviews for annual conversations that really work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Reimagining performance in organizations results in astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.  "There are alternatives, and it might be easier than you think."  This scoop summarizes how it works, from HopeLab. 

   

Excerpted:

     
"Like Adobe, we have also dismantled the traditional performance review and replaced it with ...the Annual Conversation... It's intended to inspire ...generative conversation about performance ...at a deeper level than might occur in regular supervision meetings throughout the year, " says Chris Marcell Murchison, Vice President Staff Development & Culture at HopeLab

 

________________
   
As a result, some staff, including managers, make astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.”

________________
   
   
  

Results   “Our staff look forward to their Annual Conversations and the impact on our culture has been profound. Employees report that they feel seen, heard, appreciated, and supported. As a result, some staff, including managers, make astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.”

    

How it works:

   

Questions We've created questions to help guide Annual Conversations. …We crowdsource questions from the entire organization and employees can add any questions they like to the basic list.


Examples include, 

"What are you working on when you feel the most purposeful? 

Why is this activity meaningful to you?" 

"What would you attempt to do in the next year if you knew you could not fail? 

    

Location Employees choose a location for the meeting.

    

Time …Typically most last anywhere from two to four hours.  …The manager and employee to decide what works best for them.

    

Non-evaluation The Annual Conversation is not an evaluation of past performance; it's a chance to reflect [and] understand… what's working and what's not, with an eye to setting future goals and enhancing growth and performance. There are no lgrades or performance rankings of any sort.

    

Merit …The Annual Conversation is not coupled to merit or incentive pay. These decisions are made separately and communicated outside the framework of the Annual Conversation.

    

Manager. There is nothing for her to prepare. [Her role is to] focus her attention on her direct report, listen, and ask questions to help deepen reflection.  

As for all Scoops, click on the photo or title to see the full article.

Related change & performance posts by Deb:

            

      

    

    
  • Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

             

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm hopeful in 2015 that more organizations will be able to make the commitment to a multiyear process of letting go of industrial age (inspection oriented, 20th century) performance practices to give practices like the Annual Conversation a try.  It's possible to jump even further away from a manager, individual employee model.  Find out more here.   ~  Deb

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Social Business Tools Are Transforming the Way We Work & Give Feedback

Social Business Tools Are Transforming the Way We Work & Give Feedback | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Social business, the use of social network platforms for workplace communication and collaboration, is new... ...Some businesses are harnessing the power of social platforms to facilitate workplace productivity.


__________________
   
Consider the transformation when co-workers replace one-to-one emails with group collaboration.
   

__________________


... first entries include Yammer, Rypple, and NationalField in 2008. Saba released its first social networking solutions for HR in 2009, and Mango Apps, 7Geese, and Globoforce came along in 2010.


Yammer, acquired by Microsoft, originally described itself as “Facebook for business.” Rypple, bought by Salesforce.com and rebranded as Work.com, gives companies an online motivational and coaching tool. Globoforce invites supervisors and peers to encourage each other with positive feedback, including digital badges and rewards.

     

[These] tools of social business field are leading to a new level of organizational transparency.   ...Consider the transformation when co-workers replace one-to-one emails with group collaboration on a social platform. A worker in Charlotte asks a question, a colleague in London answers, a team member in Shanghai provides clarification, and many other employees are brought along for the ride. With social tools, employees pool their knowledge and get the work done.
      

Social tools also act as new platforms for performance appraisals that are relevant and positive in real time. Work.com offers the option of anonymous feedback, which the company says is easier to give and receive. Saba’s Pulse funnels social feedback into a company’s formal review process. Adobe Systems, on the other hand, has done away with traditional performance reviews and has replaced it with its own new platform, Check-In, for informal real-time responses.

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

     

    

  

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Be careful what you ask for, you just might get it.  Those staffers who've asked for more transparency from their administrators, could find themselves out in the open, ready to shine or ready to run away once social collaboration fully meets the light of day.  

I for one am very curious to learn of how Adobe Systems, using Check-in, may be making progress with reinventing performance review and dealing with the problems of individualistic feedback, as all of us work as part of a system, reference, W. Edward Deming's "Red Bead Experiment."  Stay tuned, it may be a bumpy ride, and it could be a transformation of better understanding human performance is in store.  ~  D 

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Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google

Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

It’s simply harder to give difficult feedback than positive feedback or no feedback.  ...It creates tension.  However...70% of the time, it's worth it...


This interview with Karen May, vice president for people development at Google, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.


Excerpt:

    

If you’ve identified something that isn’t going well, then you’re likely to be asked, “How do I fix it?” If you don’t know the answer, you might not want to start the conversation. 


________________
    
People can do something with the feedback probably 70% of the time.

   

________________


As a coach, I was often in the position of giving people feedback they hadn’t heard before, after I interviewed a bunch of people they work with. It was always difficult for me, too.

    

....But I came to find that people are incredibly grateful. If I’m not doing well and I don’t know it or I don’t know why or I can’t put my finger on what’s not working and no one will tell me, I won’t be able to fix it.

   

...if you give me the information, the moment that the information is being transferred is painful, but then I have the opportunity to change it. I’ve come to realize that one of the most valuable things I could do for somebody is tell them exactly what nobody else had told them before.

     

Q. How often does that have a positive outcome?

    

A. People can do something with the feedback probably 70 percent of the time. And for the other 30 percent, they are either not willing to take it in, it doesn’t fit their self-image, they’re too resistant, in denial, or they don’t have the wherewithal to change it.

...the reality is that most change happens in small increments. So if you’re watching to see if someone’s changing, you have to watch for the incremental change. It’s not a straight line


Related posts by Deb:
     

A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture


Selecting a Coach: Connect, Clarify and Commit & 10 Questions to Ask Your Prospective Coach

      

The Pervasive Talent Myths Meet FLOW, Using Your Strengths

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is insightful from several perspectives:  that of helping people work through their blind spots, serving as a coach and NOT expecting to "fix it" as the key to the feedback.   There are alternative approaches to consider for feedback as well  (Escape from the Red Zone.)  

Ultimately, high performance and development requires an informed view of how to deal with feedback.   ~  Deb

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Thinking the Unthinkable ~ Metrics does not equal Achievement

Thinking the Unthinkable ~ Metrics does not equal Achievement | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
We're at the place where things start to go crazy. The dramatic acceleration of technical change coupled with the data explosion puts us at a precipice. Everywhere I look, people are scratching their heads.


Excerpts:

HR and its processes are going to be automated in the immediate future. ...the more thoughtful parts of the business will come under the dome of digitization.


__________________

...data visualization tools .....are all averages...[which] hide as much as they disclose. For the state of the art to involve the recounting of averages is a sad commentary on how far behind our profession has fallen.

__________________

The first wave will be data visualization tools that expose the massive inefficiencies in our processes.


Take the “cost to hire” or “time to hire” statistics. To date, they’ve been presented as averages that can be disected to see departmental averages and even job specific averages.


The problem is that they are all averages. Anyone who has been following our growing statistical literacy understands that averages hide as much as they disclose. For the state of the art to involve the recounting of averages is a sad commentary on how far behind our profession has fallen.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Metrics and industrial age measurement madness.   As W. Edwards Deming said, "“But he that would run his company on visible figures alone will in time have neither company nor figures”
“Out of the Crisis” 1982 – page 121.  

What will be important is getting good decision data, great metrics, the few, the best, the proud, to those who can best use it.  ~  Deb

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What Can Swarms Teach Us About Teams and High Performance?

What Can Swarms Teach Us About Teams and High Performance? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Do you want your organization to behave in a more collaborative way? For better results, try taking some cues from nature."


The notion of “swarming” to assemble a cross-functional or cross-departmental team, could be considered a key factor in an organization’s ability to develop and thrive.


Gartner described a work swarm as a “flurry of collective activity” to deal with non-routine workplace problems or opportunities. Without this option, organizations can fall short in their quest to respond to stressors (or opportunities) in quickly changing internal and external environments.


....Building a pipeline of talent is imperative with swarming – but this should be developed in a manner that is meaningful. Mapping the skills and strengths of potential team players within relevant industries, becomes a critical goal.


Furthermore, teaming applications (like Jostle), can also help document the evolving skill sets of potential contributors.


Related posts by Deb:


    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you want to jump start an exploration of swarming, look at large group methods  that are swarm friendly, including Open Space Technology - photos here.


Also, this article reminds me of the Membership, Control, Goal simple model that helps create movement & synergy in a team.


I'm encouraged by organizations looking seriously into swarming support and creating more  permeable boundaries around formerly rigid roles.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 22, 2013 10:23 AM

Agile Learning include teams including flexible, adaptable conditions, vs. more rigid hierarchies, that allow teams to develop.  ~  D

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:07 AM

A post that gathered interest  right away on the Talent and Performance Development curation stream.  Note the key aspect, "non-routine" workplace problems or opportunities. "


Don't we all have these?  Are we ready to respond to non-standard events, "anti-fragile?"


From  Talent and Performance Development, which also features recent articles on performance metrics and management (reinvention.)

~  Deb 

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Classic: How to Give Good Feedback, Beyond Appraisal

Classic:  How to Give Good Feedback, Beyond Appraisal | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"...Human nature hasn't changed - few of us enjoy hearing about our shortcomings, and few of our bosses and colleagues look forward to describing them.


Part of the problem is that work itself has changed - it's more team- oriented, less individualistic. The tougher it is to measure individual performance, the tougher it is to evaluate it."

___________________________


The tougher it is to measure individual performance, the tougher it is to evaluate it."

___________________________


Parkview Medical Center in Pueblo, Colorado ...explor[ed] how best to modify the hospital's existing checklist-based reviews: Which ratings made the most sense? Which scoring systems worked best? But no amount of tinkering satisfied Parkview's leaders.


Dorothy Gill, vice president of human resources, and a team of her colleagues explained their dilemma to the CEO: "He said, 'If there isn't a better way to do reviews, let's just stop doing them.' So we did. 


Gill and her colleagues eventually came up with an idea. It's called APOP, for Annual Piece of Paper. The most valuable kinds of feedback, they concluded, are the daily interactions between leaders and their people - interactions that can't be captured on paper.


The hospital still requires that managers do annual reviews. But instead of being top-down appraisals, the reviews are bottom-up requests for assistance: What can the leader do to make the employee's job easier? What gets in the way of accomplishing the job?


___________________________

There are no scores, no written goals for the next year....  the...process "takes performance reviews and turns them upside down." 

___________________________


And the medium for those reviews is conversation, not written evaluation. There is a form - the APOP. But its only role is to confirm that the conversations took place. There are no scores, no written goals for the next year.


It's literally a piece of paper, signed by the employee and the director, that records the date, place, and agenda of the meeting. The APOP process "takes performance reviews and turns them upside down," Gill says. "Directors don't tell employees how they're doing. They ask open-ended questions to see what will help employees do a better job."


photo: by felipe.cabrera, Flickr CC 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a classic article from way back, 1998, that is still fresh and current today on the topic, with many relevant business examples and practice tips.  


Parkview Medical Center is still around.  Hospital reviews are available via US News and World report.  They are placing as one of the top 11 hospitals in the state for several health practice areas.  ~  Deb

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Top Challenges Facing Organizations over the Next Decade - SHRM perspective

Top Challenges Facing Organizations over the Next Decade - SHRM perspective | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Is there REALLY a talent shortage?

Yes...a very controversial topic...some say we do, others wonder how we could have a shortage with such high unemployment.

....About the same number of qualified candidates apply for the job... mixed in with 20 applications or 200 applications....with only 1 or 2 of them fully qualifying.


Top trends?

According to the SHRM survey. With 483 HR executives reporting, here are what they say (just a few of the results)...


________________________

...to the employee, the supervisor IS the organization...

________________________


1.  Retaining and rewarding the best employees
... they show up, very excited to begin their new endeavor, disappointed to find that the pay raises are inadequate, employee morale is low, gossip is high, integrity is questionable, workload is greater than expected, and overall a work environment that is not employee-friendly.

... It may not be an organizational issue...it may be isolated to the supervisor. ...to the employee, the supervisor IS the organization...and if that is what they experience, that is what they will use as the basis to find new employment and to tell other people about their experience with your organization.

2.  Developing the next generation of corporate leaders
...We often wait to train employees until they are in the management position...which sets us behind as the new employees typically don't have the tools they need to be successful from the start.


....By providing a development plan a couple years out, we can train up and coming managers the right way. ...more than simply creating a succession matrix... identify individuals who can fill those future roles.

3.  Creating a corporate culture that attracts the best employees to the organization


4.  Remaining competitive in the talent marketplace



___________________

....it is EASIER to develop current talent than to find new talent. 

___________________



5.  Finding employees with the increasingly specialized skills we need
...a steady decline in STEM students (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) and STEM related positions. We are also lacking in other skills that typically set us apart in the United States...such as problem solving, leadership, decision making, competitiveness, etc.


....it is EASIER to develop current talent than to find new talent. This goes back to ...finding the core talent that already exists in the organization and developing it further for additional roles. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Is it about coming in with the skills needed (the talent shortage?) our about hiring for capability and capacity?  

It's good to see what SHRM provides from trend surveying and put it in perspective with other data, including hiring, succession management (not just a matrix), motivation science (not as evident here), pay and culture.  ~  D

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Performance Appraisals, Numbers and Nuance. Behaviors and values matter.

Performance Appraisals, Numbers and Nuance.  Behaviors and values matter. | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

There’s a bogus belief that gets in managers’ way when they evaluate performance - deceptively quantifiable metrics.

... Consider a [...] job that seems to offer a deceptively quantifiable metric: the performance of a translator. How do you measure a translator's performance?


The obvious, easy, and wrong answer: the number of documents translated.    ... it takes no notice of what is genuinely important - the ability to capture nuance.


____________________

...translates each word accurately [or] ...captures what the writer really intended."

____________________


The ability isn't hard to evaluate accurately. Just take a document written in a foreign language and give it to two translators.   Then take their two translations to a native speaker and ask, "Which one got it right?"


The native speaker will read the two documents and then comfortably say, "This one translates each word accurately. But this one - this one captures what the writer really intended."


Photo credit: by WordShore via Flickr.com CC   


Via Charles Tiayon
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Assessment of performance includes clarifying what quality really means.  It isn't necessarily about volume in this example shows.  Would translators approve this measurement of this work?   Probably so.  ~  D

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TestOps Tech: Beginning a New Trend in Performance Management with Cloud Data

TestOps Tech: Beginning a New Trend in Performance Management with Cloud Data | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

DevOps and TestOps?  If you are curious or if the jargon rings a bell, here's one of the newest trends in data and measurement, relating to Performance Management on the tech side of the topic.


Excerpted:  


DevOps has attracted a lot of attention, and boasts plenty of successes already. TestOps is even newer and less well-understood--but is on course to bring its own advantages.


 in my own career, I’ve battled against silos that also isolate such other domains as Training and Support. Sometimes there are good reasons....certainly there are few organizations which put them on the same level during planning.


A tiny but growing number, though, are exploring “TestOps”, which, at its most aggressive, claims that “[t]esters are uniquely qualified to lead the way to a more nimble enterprise.


TestOps remains so small that there is no Wikipedia entry [yet.]  [And yet]...it’s a common term of art within Microsoft and a few other large industry players.


...If you’re in any field with objective success criteria, though, and especially if the cloud is the basis for at least part of your infrastructure, it’s time for you to explore how to make the most of TestOps principles.


Photo source:  What is DevOps?


Via Riaz Khan
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This post is the tech systems/macro side of performance management - similar to two perspectives on what change management really is, by definition.  Measurement criteria (objective success criteria, success factors, etc.) is the Achilles Heel of performance management success, both choice of measures and process.  Get it right, and talent and performance management can be a mighty force.  ~  D

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The Right Support at the Right Time: Embedded Performer Support

The Right Support at the Right Time:  Embedded Performer Support | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

....an urgent announcement, “This is a code yellow alert! – Repeat – This is a code yellow alert!”

My colleagues and I snatched for the laminated cards that hung around our necks and determined that a “code yellow” meant there was a hazardous materials spill in the building and we were to evacuate immediately. We did. No one was injured. We had the perfect EPS application available to us at the right time.


...Whatever technology is used to enable that seamless, frictionless, ubiquitous link to the right EPS needs to answer several critical questions including:

  • Who is/are the performer(s)?
  • What are the performance expectations of their role?
  • What are the expectations [tangible outcomes] of their performance?
  • Where are they physically located when the moment of need arises?
  • Where are they located within a workflow when the moment of need arises?
  • What is their level of connectivity when the moment of need arises?
  • What devices are in the hands of the performer when the moment of need arises?
  • What environmental attributes are present that could influence/impede performance?
  • What is the level of urgency to perform flawlessly at the moment of need?
  • What are the risks associated with less than flawless performance?
     

Take note that these questions are all addressing performance…and the performer…in their post-training work context. I draw this distinction because the answers to these questions shine the light on what “technology mix” and what “access/delivery venues” are most appropriate to enable an effective EPS solution.


Via Paul Summers
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A useful set of questions to spur thinking on timely performance support.  ~  D

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Sustaining Leadership Development: 7 Disciplines that Make it Work

Sustaining Leadership Development:  7 Disciplines that Make it Work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"What matters most is the impact of the leader's actions on others—not just the actions themselves or the rationale behind them." 

In the recent book,  Leadership Sustainability, (Pub. March 2013), authors Dave Ulrich and Norm Smallwood have defined seven leadership practices that instill sustainability:


Simplicity. Focus on what matters most. Tells stories with impact...

Time. Employees see what leaders do more than listen to what they say...

Accountability. Take personal responsibility for doing what you say you will do and hold others accountable as well. 

Resources. Get coaching and institutional support to become a better leader. 

Tracking. Measure what's important and not what's easy. Tie to consequences. 

Melioration. Master the principles of learning: to experiment frequently, to reflect always, to become resilient, to face failure, to not be calloused to success, and to improvise continually. 

Emotion. "Leaders who are emotionally vulnerable and transparent will be more likely to sustain change."


Read the full book review blog post by Leadership Now:  


http://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2013/06/seven_disciplines_that_make_le.html


Related posts by Deb:

   

     
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Dave Ulrich is well known in the top consulting circles and for incorporating Positive Organization Scholarship (POS) which is well represented by what he and his co-author include in their 7 top sustainability practices.  ~  Deb

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What is your Clock for Change? Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation

What is your Clock for Change?  Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

This excerpt features the assessment tool, the iWAM, which reveals ‘change’ patterns as motivational patterns and shows us what our ‘Clock’ for change looks like.  iWam = the Inventory for Work Attitude & Motivation

The iWAM “Clock” answers the question ..."After how many years one needs a significant change to be motivated again?"

Learning about a top-performer’s need for change allows us to plan for the time when burnout would set in so that we can prevent it and retain our top talent.


The information from the Clock also helps us make better career decisions and work-life planning.


From the iWam website:


The iWam is based on a model of cognitive thinking styles (48 parameters are measured and explained). The iWAM Management Report identifies a person's motivational and attitude preferences in the job context and predicts how this person will behave in various job types, such as administrative, customer contact or managerial tasks.

The 
iWAM Attitude Sorter predicts key motivational preferences and development areas. The questionnaire can be administered over the Internet or as a pen-and-paper test. The iWAM is currently available in more than 15 languages. Test administration takes 25 to 45 minutes.


Source: http://www.theiwam.com/the-clock


Photo by deux-chi, Flickr


Related tools & posts by Deb:

    

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The iWam is a moderate to advanced assessment instrument that is useful for looking at work attitudes and motivation.  Samples of iWam reports are here


~ Deb

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Talent and Performance Development

Talent and Performance Development | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Every job is a self-portrait of the person who did it. Autograph your work with excellence."


~ Ted Key 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This quote is usually misattributed, as listed here.  Ted Key, an American cartoonist and writer  (1912-2008) did a series of posters.  This particular illustrated saying achieved popularity.

It is quite appropriate to Talent and Performance Development's curation stream.


The saying has been frequently cited, but Key has rarely been credited. 


Wikipedia: Ted Key 
Ted Key, born Theodore Keyser (August 25, 1912 – May 3, 2008), was an American cartoonist and writer. He is best known as the creator of the cartoon panel Hazel, which was later the basis for a television series of the same name. 

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How to Evaluate Performance of Project Teams

How to Evaluate Performance of Project Teams | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

An HR manager offers suggestions on  evaluating project team performance including a template you can download for your use.


[Teams] want know what is working and what isn't. Team evaluations don't necessarily have to be negative. If weak areas exist, remarks made can turn those negatives into positives.


Your team's project performance should be evaluated in one of two ways:

  • Team members should evaluate themselves and each other.

  • Team members should evaluate each other and team leaders should evaluate individual team members.  [DN:  The team leader is also a part of the team evaluation.]


Photo by Ekaterina Sotova Flickr-cc


Related posts from Deb:

    

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

    

Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The downloadable form is behavioral and a good start for looking at moving away from individual performance appraisal.  What would improve it even more is simply providing data to teams members on key metrics that are central to improving results.

We still have aways to go.  ~  D

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How To Deal With A Bullying Boss

How To Deal With A Bullying Boss | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Are you a victim of workplace bullying? Here's what to do.


Excerpts:

Namie says confronting the boss is “rarely effective and ill-advised.” In early 2012, WBI asked 1,598 individuals who were personally familiar with workplace bullying what strategies they adopted to get their bullying to stop, and whether those actions were effective. Here’s what they said (excerpted):


  • About 38% of bullied employees essentially did nothing. In other words, he or she let time pass, hoping matters would improve on their own. Effectiveness of doing nothing: 3.25%

____________________

“Employers are responsible for all work conditions and the assignment of workers to supervisors..."

____________________
   
  • About 70% of employees directly confronted the perpetrator. Effectiveness of confronting: 3.57%
    
  • About 34% of bullied workers tried to find an attorney to file a lawsuit.    Effectiveness of finding an attorney: 11.2%
   

“Employers are responsible for all work conditions and the assignment of workers to supervisors,” Namie says. “So, employers can stop workplace bullying if they wanted to. 


No laws yet compel action or policies, so all employer actions would be voluntary.” About 68% of executives think workplace bullying is a serious problem—but few organizations (5.5%) are doing anything about it.

 

Related posts by Deb:


     

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article has great references and on-target strategies on a persistent problem in organizations.  Attention, prevention and intervention are key categories to making a dent in boss bullying.  


Note that, only 5.5% are doing anything about bullying, though almost 70% think it is a problem.  ~  Deb

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How To Follow a Topic on ScoopIt > Click!

How To Follow a Topic on ScoopIt  > Click! | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Click the 'follow' button at the top, right of this page.

 

Trying to find posts on a particular topic? Click 'filter' tab above and choose an area of interest.

 

Thank you in advance for aligned topic suggestions and your 'thank yous!"   I appreciate it!


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Hector Cortez's curator insight, August 2, 2015 4:12 PM

añada su visión ...

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Out of the Chaos: Talent and Performance Management Meets HCM with a Cool Tablet Tool

Out of the Chaos:  Talent and Performance Management Meets HCM with a Cool Tablet Tool | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

The biggest miss for most organizations in the previous chaos was the connection between their workforce management, payroll, or HCM systems and their recruiting, succession, development, and planning processes.


 ...the ability to physically integrate a series of talent management processes on a proprietary but open platform device is potentially (bold mine, DN) a game-changer, 


At its annual customer forum this week, Ceridian  ...threw its hat into the integrated talent management ring, and from a strong position. ...Ceridian is rolling out more strategic, less transactional modules over the next couple of years, including succession planning, compensation and rewards, and performance management.


Related posts by Deb:

    
   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Systems are developing to a higher level than just record keeping & financials.  Analytics lessons from social media, e.g. Google, Facebook and YouTube analytics, have paved a path to get good as well as in-depth (Google) information, data input tools (devices) and data feedback to people.


IS this a GOOD thing?  Welll....  It may simply be the same old, same old repackaged into a shiny app on a tablet.  Success Factors is the partnership with Ceridian on the tool. 

The video on Ceridian's website features their payroll & timekeeping functions mainly.  It's pretty spiffy, for that. ~  D

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Four Major Flaws of Force Ranking - i4cp

Four Major Flaws of Force Ranking  - i4cp | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Forced Ranking or "The Vitality Curve" -  This isn't comparing apples to apples; it's like comparing apples to bacon.

The chart above are the results from a recent i4cp study on performance rankings, published in  Performance Management Playbook: Managing Critical Performance Challenges, showing a sharp decline in both forced rating and forced ranking since 2009.  

  • Two-thirds of companies that did utilize these practices abandoning them - from 49% in 2009 to 14% in 2011.
  
i4cp's list of shortcomings of force ranking includes:
 

Companies unwittingly give a huge boost to the competition.

..when Microsoft jettisons their presumed lower-performing employees, they are providing the competition with fresh talent

   

The bottom 10% isn't always the bottom 10%.

An employee who is in the bottom 10% in a high-performing department might rank much higher when compared to employees in a different department that has lower overall performance. Why should that employee be let go when he or she outperforms those in other fucntions? This isn't comparing apples to apples; it's like comparing apples to bacon.

   

Forced ranking can be an engagement and innovation killer.
    
Related posts by Deb:

     

   




Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Dick Grote is still touting forced rankings (in a modified way, but still rank & remove) in his articles and books on performance appraisal and performance management.  

The i4cp consulting group offers reasons why it's not working in 2012.  ~  D

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Peer Performance Reviews - Reviewed

Peer Performance Reviews - Reviewed | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Some companies are doing away with traditional top-down, manager-led performance reviews and relying on the rank-and-file for employee evaluations.


The system provides more valuable information about each worker's performance than a review by just one person would, Mr. Garrity says. That's particularly true at Hearsay Social, because it has very few formal managers, most employees work across multiple teams, and leadership changes from project to project.


___________________

"We are decentralizing as much decision making as we can, so we also need to decentralize reviews..." 

___________________


"We are decentralizing as much decision making as we can, so we also need to decentralize reviews," says Steve Garrity, the chief technology officer.  at Hearsay Social Inc., a San Francisco-based social-media software company with some 90 employees.


But the process, which the firm plans to do twice a year, is also time-consuming and complicated, he says, and it may not work as the employee count grows. 


___________________


...crowdsourced feedback may not provide better data....feedback may gravitate toward positive and negative extremes...

___________________



...Crowdsourced evaluations go a step beyond traditional 360-degree reviews, which are generally more structured and often involve lengthy surveys.   


___________________


 "...Another potential downside is "rating fatigue" and lower quality information..."

___________________


But critics argue that crowdsourced feedback may not provide better data. Like online restaurant or product reviews, feedback may gravitate toward positive and negative extremes, says Tracy Maylett, chief executive of DecisionWise.   ...Another potential downside is "rating fatigue" and lower quality information, he adds.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Assessing the "why" of these processes are key.  For example, the goals of peer review may fit the type of work that happens in  team oriented cultures of a certain size.  360 feedback is also best for newer to mid-level managers, open to development.  ~  D

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David Hain's curator insight, July 16, 2013 4:11 AM

Fascinating experiment - hope it works!

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Performance Management ~ Change the Focus, The Hooper-Bacal Method

Performance Management ~ Change the Focus, The Hooper-Bacal Method | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

It doesn’t rely on ratings...  Some annual documentation — some kind of formal performance review process [is a formality.)  That is one of Robert Bacal's suggested changes on what to de-emphasize in performance management.


In the Hooper-Bacal Method, this was a formality, never surprising the employee or the manager. The “forms” were so insignificant in the process that I can’t even recall what they were — certainly not those awful rating forms.


The meetings were, once again, short, sometimes as little as fifteen minutes, and while the mere phrase “performance review” created some anxiety, for the most part, once employees “got” that it wasn’t a case of being shocked by bad news, the annual review became a much more comfortable process.


Photo:  Billso on Flickr.com CC


- See more at: http://work911.com/wp/?p=10551#sthash.LNgEhYtZ.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Eliminating the traditional single manager-driven ratings is one big step in the right direction.

I used Robert Bacal's approach (putting the emphasis in through the year data collection, not end of year appraisal) for many years, helping business departments and organizations design a process that would work for them, including unionized environments.  


His is a useful website rich with seasoned perspective on improving or eliminating aspects of flawed appraisal practices.


~  Deb

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Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools & Why?) Change, Lean, 6 Sigma & more

Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools & Why?) Change, Lean, 6 Sigma & more | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

  • "What problem are we trying to solve?” 

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This helpful review highlights the framework that helps good and great performance happen with individuals, teams and in companies:  Choosing the best tools (and I'd add the best processes / change flow) at the right time to deliver right results.  

I bought the book and am reading it with great interest, as it is one of the few newer books that systemically look at  performance infrastructure.


This new book on the performance and talent management front seems to get it right including it's ambitious scope of trendy tools.   I'm reading it now and will share if it does or doesn't deliver.  ~  D

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:07 AM

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 4:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 3:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!
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Replacing Performance Appraisal with Better Practices

Replacing Performance Appraisal with Better Practices | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"The annual performance appraisal [does NOT] actually increase performance. So, what should replace them?  There are three strategic resources to replace the performance appraisal system:


  1. Key Predictive Indicators for Knowledge Workers
  2. The Manager’s Letter
  3. After-Action 



_____________________
    
Better to be approximately relevant rather than precisely irrelevant.

_____________________


Knowledge work is not defined by quantity, but quality; not by its costs, but results. The traditional tools of measurement need to be replaced by judgment. And there is a difference between a measurement and a judgment: a measurement requires only a scale; a judgment requires wisdom.

   

....So many leaders worry that if they get rid of objective measures, they will introduce subjective bias into the decision-making process. So what? To get rid of bias we would have to give up emotions and discernment, which is too high a price to pay. Neurologist Antonio Damasio has studied brain-damaged patients, demonstrating that without emotion it is impossible to make decisions.

    

Admittedly, the following KPIs raise rather than answer questions, but at least they raise the right questions. Better to be approximately relevant rather than precisely irrelevant. Enlightened organizations allow their team members to decide which of the following KPIs are most important to track and develop.



Related posts by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is rich, practical post is also listed with "Innovation and Institutions"  since any organization that successfully dispenses with this deeply flawed practice is innovating indeed.  


So many leaders are reluctant to take this step under the guise of wanting to believe the metrics tied to appraisal are fully valid.  It's doubtful they are if subjective managers are making the call.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 15, 2013 3:42 PM

This is a wonderfully rich post on how to set forth good alternatives to this dreaded and deeply flawed practice.  It features how to get on the right path with "practical suggestion(s) to hold people accountable for their future contribution..."  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 16, 2013 9:41 AM
From a Google+ post discussion with Vince: I think most metrics involving human beings are rife with subjectivity under the guise of objective measurement.

In my experience working with organizations designing their perf. mgmt. processes, there was a year that a business had minimal salary to distribute for the yearly program. They decided to do across the board increases with adjustments (those paid under a certain amount had a bigger increase.) They also, that year, completely severed the performance appraisal and salary link. Result: The performance review conversations completely changed. For the first time, staffers asked for additional time to complete the year end discussion, using it to really build understanding and plan for the year ahead (feed forward concept.)

If there was one business practice that would do much better, "resting in pieces," it would be performance "management."