Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Why Some Teams Perform Better than Others: The Secret Ingredient

Why Some Teams Perform Better than Others: The Secret Ingredient | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Culture defines any business, yet it's also one of the hardest things to manage. In this extract from her TED Book, Margaret Heffernan describes the important, often-overlooked element necessary to build an effective, efficient organization: social capital."

     
...Having a high aggregate intelligence or just one or two superstars wasn’t critical. The groups that surfaced more and better solutions shared three key qualities.
   
  • First, they gave one another roughly equal time to talk. This wasn’t monitored or regulated, but no one in these high-achieving groups dominated or was a passenger. Everyone contributed and nothing any one person said was wasted.
   
  • The second quality ...was social sensitivity: these individuals were more tuned in to one another, to subtle shifts in mood and demeanor. They scored more highly on a test called Reading the Mind in the Eyes, which is broadly considered a test for empathy. 
  • The third distinguishing feature was that the best groups included more women, perhaps because that made them more diverse, or because women tend to score more highly on tests for empathy. What this (and much more) research highlights is just how critical the role of social connectedness can be.
    
   ...In large organizations, ...A functional head will challenge a regional head and then they will reverse roles. This way, they learn the exigencies and contingencies of both positions; they start to see common themes, ways they can help and support each other, and empathy grows.
       
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Social capital, here, features the ability to let go of a singular perspective and take on the perspective of another.  Here it is the key way to expand understanding and take on a system perspective more fully. The complexities of a system become accessible in empathy and social capital investment.  Business intelligence, in this way includes metrics and so much more.  ~  Deb

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James Rigby's curator insight, March 2, 9:38 AM

A really great blog!

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Our Dangerous Obsession with "Vanity Metrics" and External Recognition

Our Dangerous Obsession with "Vanity Metrics" and External Recognition | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Our LinkedIn connections, speaking engagements, and press profiles should be seen as rewards for the value we create, not the actual process by which value is created.


If you’re too focused on these “vanity metrics,” you risk painting an all-too optimistic picture of yourself without accurately identifying, measuring, and improving the underlying drivers of your performance.

    

___________________________

     

 “Strive not be a success, but rather to be of value.” ~ Albert Einstein

    

___________________________


...Instead of measuring your progress using the yardstick of external recognition, focus on achieving your vision first, and you’ll be more visible than you can imagine.


...people who tap into their deep intrinsic motivations are much more (PDF) likely to succeed on long-term projects and hit loftier goals than those who are powered by the praise of others.

Related posts & tools by Deb:



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article lends perspective to overdoing the visibility factor in social media and in professional networks & in using speaking gigs.  What do you actually contribute via Vision and Desired Outcomes, to make a difference?  ~ D

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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 12, 2013 6:39 PM

Interesting article, and much of what it states is true however we are not so sure that it's going to change a lot of people's behavior though.  We have always beleived that character counted more than being a character, but its good to be both though....;-)

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Are Annual Performance Reviews Like the Hotel California? You Can Never Leave?

Are Annual Performance Reviews Like the Hotel California?  You Can Never Leave? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

[The] diosyncratic seasonal events [for] HR .... the annual performance appraisal:

       

  • They are time-consuming, involve too much paperwork
           
  • HR would even do better to drop them altogether and find a better performance-management tool. 
       
  • ...Management consultancy Hay Group found half of public sector workers and one-third of business leaders describe appraisals as a box-ticking exercise. 
      

A recent US poll of 2,677 people (1,800 employees, 645 HR managers, and 232 CEOs) by San Francisco-based rewards-and-recognition consulting firm Achievers revealed 98% of staff find annual performance reviews unnecessary.

    

  • Among the 2,677 respondents, a quarter were HR professionals.

    

Edward Lawler, professor of business at University of Southern California, reacted by declaring: "Performance appraisals are dead." But he also unveiled research showing 93% of companies use annual appraisals, and only 6% have considered dropping them.

   

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

     

        

       

   

     

          

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The song by the Eagles, regarding our long ties to performance reviews:  "You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave."

In this post, it's useful to read the comments, most of which are about still attempting to tweak performance management systems.


A final commenter suggests:

"...The fundamental false assumption is that performance is due to the people when research and case studies show that it is due almost wholly on the system, i.e. the way the work works.

Replacing appraisals with a different approach frees people to do what they really want, deliver better service, reduce costs and increases morale. What more do you want!"

As for who is actually doing this, I've listed links above to help.   ~  Deb 

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Is Your Ego Killing Your Workers' Performance? Power & Team Performance Research

Is Your Ego Killing Your Workers' Performance? Power & Team Performance Research | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Though strong leadership has long been thought to be the key to an organization's success, new research suggests otherwise via a new study by researchers at the University of Michigan, Harvard and Duke


Excerpts:
 

"By doing most of the talking, powerful formal leaders conveyed a sense that they were not open to others' input, and this dynamic produced a lower level of team performance, as measured by the team's ability to reach their goals in the simulation," the authors wrote.


In another experiment, participants were divided into four-person teams and were asked to carry out an exercise in which reaching the right decision on a personnel issue depended on each group's ability to share information.

Half of the designated team leaders were prepared before the experiment with the power questions, and half were not. Additionally, half the leaders were reminded that all team members had the potential to contribute to the team's success.
 

The researchers found that not one of the teams with the "powerful" leaders who had not been reminded about team contributions reached the right decision, compared with more than half of the other teams.
 

"Feelings of power produce a tendency to devalue the perspectives, opinions and contributions of others," the authors wrote. "When leaders were reminded that all team members had the potential to contribute to the team's success, these effects did not emerge."


Related posts and research findings via Deb:

    
     

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Power easily disrupts team performance..  This research helps clarify the ongoing reminders of affects of hierarchy in corporate environments  ~ Deb

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Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It! | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Looking for high performance in your organization?  Then take a good look at teams vs. groups.  Research findings about how work teams appear to be gaining in strength, and the communication patterns that help it happen.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is my own new blog posts on high performance team research.  It includes a handout on the differences between teams and groups or psuedo-teams, as well as research from several sources that help define what makes a real team as well as a high performance or "dream" team.  ~  Deb 

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Brain Science: A Multitasking Video Game Makes Old Brains Act Younger

Brain Science:  A Multitasking Video Game Makes Old Brains Act Younger | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

by Matt Richtel


"Brain scientists have discovered that swerving around cars while simultaneously picking out road signs in a video game can improve the short-term memory and long-term focus of older adults. Some people as old as 80, the researchers say, begin to show neurological patterns of people in their 20s.

______________________

Some people as old as 80...begin to show neurological patterns of people in their 20s.

______________________

 


"Cognitive scientists say the findings, to be published Thursday in the scientific journal Nature, are a significant development in understanding how to strengthen older brains. That is because the improvements in brain performance did not come just within the game but were shown outside the game in other cognitive tasks.


"Further supporting the findings, the researchers were able to measure and show changes in brain wave activity, suggesting that this research could help understand what neurological mechanisms should and could be tinkered with to improve memory and attention."


Via Jim Lerman
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Useful and surprising findings on a good place for multi-tasking.  ~ Deb

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AnnC's curator insight, September 7, 2013 1:31 PM

Playing some videogames may help keep our brains young.

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Research team systemic learning

"...one early response chastised us for being 'too ambitious'...Why is it that corporate entities can have ambitious plans but researchers are expected to think in isolated minutiae? "


Excerpted from the blog post:


Why not start with an open system rather than adding openness on as an afterthought once systems are already established?


To address the need for openness of platforms, algorithms and ensure that the learning process remains a key focus, a group of us have proposed the development of an open learning analytics architecture/platform.


We’ve posted our (beta) vision online: Open Learning Analytics: an integrated & modularized platform (.pdf). 


We are interested in hearing from, and partnering with, others – researchers, educators, universities, schools, startups, and corporate partners (learning and development departments).


We have submitted several grant applications and have a few more that will be submitted in the next six months (one early response chastised us for being “too ambitious”. I solidly reject that assertion. Why is it that corporate entities can have ambitious plans but researchers are expected to think in isolated minutiae?


Researchers need to think in systems and platforms in order to have an impact).

 

Source:  Envisioning a system-wide learning analytics platform ~ George Siemens December 8, 2011 Shanghai, China


Related posts from Deb:



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Leadership research by the famed Warren Bennis established that many "Great Groups" in history are staffed by younger people who tend to be more innovative and less constrained criticism of what can't be done.  

This  Open Learning wiki and this SlideShare seem to "solidly reject" such constraints.   


Kudos to them and us for reading about and paying attention to these Agile Learning concepts and working to make an impact in data-driven learning - making it real.  ~  Deb 

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Pay For Performance: Innovation Killer?

Pay For Performance:  Innovation Killer? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Talent Management magazine, The Business of Talent Management


Pay for performance is effective for employees in operational roles, such as a painter painting houses or a salesman hitting quotas. But when it comes to employees responsible for finding creative solutions to problems, the model is ineffective, said Gustavo Manso, co-author of a 2012 study published in the July issue of Management Science.


...a straight pay-for-performance model does not have a tolerance for early failure, a component essential to innovation, said Manso, an associate professor of finance at the University of California at Berkeley.


Innovation is a “trial and error process,” Manso said. “You have to try things that you don’t know if they’re going to work.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I scooped this originally to "Innovations & Institutions:  Will it Blend?" and am sharing it here due to the Pay and Performance theme. ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:08 PM

There are also cultural components to tolerance for failure.  


Also, performance and pay are linked in many, though not all performance systems.  It is how they are linked, (soft link, dotted line, one factor among others, or direct links / primary factor) that sends a message that affects extrinsic and instrinsic  (Alfie Kohn, cited), and churn (stay or go) in organizations. ~  D

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Multitasking Makes Managers Less Thoughtful and Students - Multi-media Messes

Multitasking Makes Managers Less Thoughtful and Students - Multi-media Messes | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Chronic multitaskers have a harder time with everything.

Research on electronic devices at meetings from Stanford from Clifford Nass's Communication Between Humans and Interactive Media Lab clearly indicate that those who engage in media multitasking are unable to ignore irrelevant information and have difficulty identifying which information is important.


Even watching that stream of type crawl across your television screen during the evening news makes you less likely to retain information from either the program or the crawl. 


Source:  Harvard Business Review 


From another source, The Week:

In a recent TED Talk, Nass explains how college students "triple and quadruple-book media." He says, "When they're writing a paper, they're also listening to music, using Facebook, watching YouTube, texting etc."
     

To see what impact this has on their brains, Nass tasked 262 college students with completing three experiments that examined different aspects of multitasking: Switching quickly from one task to another, filtering out irrelevant information, and using what is called "working memory," an aspect of short-term memory that allows you to hold multiple pieces of information in your mind.
     

The results? Chronic multitaskers have a harder time with everything: Telling what information is relevant, managing working memory, and ignoring irrelevant information. 

         

Source:   Theweek.com/article/index/250739/chronic-multitasking-makes-us-worse-at-everything

Related posts & tools by Deb:


            

         

 


Photo by EraPhernalia Vintage Flickr 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Multitasking is increasingly being shown, in research, to be ineffective and inefficient.  It's time to remove it as a boilerplate addition to job descriptions.  It dates the  job description and the organization using it.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 2014 11:09 PM

It's time to remove "must be able to multi-task" from 2014 job descriptions.

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Time Off, Development & Training is Less Important ~ It's about Whole Life at Work

Time Off, Development & Training is Less Important  ~ It's about Whole Life at Work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"A study shows that work-life balance might not have much to do with employee engagement."

     

U.S. employees, despite their relatively poor work-life balance, are more emotionally invested and focused on creating value. Does that mean U.S. employees don't value work-life balance? Hardly.

According to a recent Glassdoor survey,

      

  • 72 percent of American employers feel that vacation, sick time, and holidays are extremely important to their job happiness, 
   
  • behind only health care (76 percent), which admittedly, is mostly a U.S. issue.
    
  • Only 27 percent of workers felt that development and training was an important workplace issue.


...What does this all mean? Probably that time off isn't truly as valuable to our happiness as we think it is, and ...meaningful work is more valuable.


______________________

time off isn't truly as valuable to our happiness as we think it is....meaningful work is more valuable.
 ______________________


Look for ways to say yes, give feedback, and encourage employees to contribute in meaningful ways. Don't manage by rules alone. Do these things, and you'll find you have an engaged workforce that does much better than most of those in the U.S.



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Meaningful work also means happiness at work.  In trying times, work is a lifeline to many.   That is why joblessness creates tremendous turmoil.  

Also Scooped to The Art and Science of Motivation.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 18, 2013 12:31 PM

Meaningful work translates to happiness in other definitions. That is why this is listed on a Motivation curation stream.  


Do you agree that meaningful work is #1 and that development and training is of lower value?   ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:55 PM

Are you investing in the right benefits for what really matters to your employees?  Meaningful work = happiness by other definitions. 


If meaningful work is #1 and development and training is of lower value, what are the implications for the talent in your organization?


From The Science and Art of Motivation news.  ~  Deb

Sharrock's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:14 PM

This kind of information has implications for knowledge work environments, including school classrooms. Staying engaged and motivated are two issues important in classrooms as well as in the training of staff.

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Why Are We Managers So Poor at Feedback? It’s Like Trying to Explain How to Use a Towel to a Fish

Why Are We Managers So Poor at Feedback?  It’s Like Trying to Explain How to Use a Towel to a Fish | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Is the manager’s most important job to give feedback to employees? ....Study after study point to managers who are poor at giving feedback as the major reason why performance appraisals fail.


Excerpts:

"...most managers are so poor at it which means the feedback is infrequent, poorly timed, of poor quality, or all three."

Sibson Consulting reports that HR professionals are frustrated because managers don’t give constructive feedback and 58% of HR professionals give their number one feedback tool, the annual performance review, a C grade or below. 


Study after study point to managers who are poor at giving feedback as the major reason why performance appraisals fail.


...[The] ..four big reasons (barriers) why feedback is poorly done now:


  • …what managers call feedback is not feedback at all. It is criticism. Feedback is data from a process that is used for learning.
    
  • Second, current HR polices require managers to give the feedback. Why not give employees the ability and autonomy to collect their own data? ... Why not provide autonomy and trust to employees instead?
    
  • Third, the work environment most often discourages open and honest feedback. …How can managers give feedback to something they can’t see?
    
  • Fourth, most managers intuitively know….Attempting to provide feedback on the behaviors of employees without studying the entire system (the context) is like trying to explain how to use a towel to a fish.
   
Related posts by Deb:
      
Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

       

From Chaos to Creative Performance Development in a VUCA World (One that is Volatile, Uncertain, Chaotic and Ambiguous) - Slideshare

        


photo:  by deepwarren Flickr cc 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This helpful article points to the systemic source of problems in performance appraisals and feedback.  It also implies that data and business intelligence have a bigger role that managers could help happen.  

Getting data in the hands of those who could best use it for, direct, untainted, well-timed feedback relieves managers of a burdensome, low-value task and empowers them to direct data tools to where they can do the most good.  ~  Deb

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A History of Performance Appraisals, Letting Go - REVELN

"...provides a context for performance appraisals, ratings and reviews as very old ideas compared to organizational leadership pioneers and what's next.  Can we change our behaviorist-rooted habits?"


Performance management, defined in the 1970s, is rooted in scientific management. It is possible to acknowledge history, realize its impact on our business systems, and let go to embrace new strategies.


See the full blog post here:

    

A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture


Related posts also by Deb:

   

     

      

 



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This presentation is additional context for my MISHRM 2013 presentation on "From Chaos to Creative: Performance Development in a VUCA World" in Grand Rapids, Michigan, October 8th, 2013 | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM   ~  Deb

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from New Work, New Livelihood, Careers
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3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Leadership today has evolved greatly.  Our systems for supporting high performance and leadership in teams and in entire organizations has not kept up with the times."


See the article, SlideShare and videos here.

Excerpts:

At a recent workshop with JVS in Southfield Michigan, I shared some of the research and practical organization experience I’ve collected on high performance teams.
 


As we hear of findings and new development from “big data” AND “small data” (highly personalized, tracked), it is also good to explore how access to performance data can inform leadership at all levels and encourage team achievement and speed, especially when old practices that slow and interfere with performance are removed.


Also keep in mind the differences between true teams vs. psuedo-teams  and groups.  Many project and task groups are assembled as teams to accomplish a charge or purpose.    Sometimes these groups or teams: 

  • produce an innovation or breakthrough success for their organizations,
  • are formed based on a favorite interest or pet project idea of an executive that, in hindsight, provides limited value to their organization.    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Besides research, this article includes my  interview findings of what stops performance dead in its tracks, including fresh insights from an interview of a millennial, a 25 year old, describing her work experience after graduating from college in 2010.    ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:39 PM

This is one of my own posts featuring research on emotional space in high performance teams as well as the positivity / negativity ratios in such teams.   What do you think?  ~  Deb

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6 Game Findings: High Performance Teams > Leadership & Decision Making

6 Game Findings: High Performance Teams > Leadership & Decision Making | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"6 critical differences between top performers and the rest in the areas of leadership and decision-making."


Finding 1: Top Performers avoided the "Presumption of change" trap.

Evidence for Finding 1: Even though the game starts with each team inheriting a business from the previous executive team 95% of the participants showed no curiosity regarding how successful the previous leadership team had been and why!


...almost all new leaders focus on what they need to change but not what they need to preserve.


What to change is only part of the challenge and for whatever reason (ego, identity, peer pressure ...) showing a lack of respect for the previous team's achievements seems to be a good predictor of sub-optimal performance.


Finding 2: Top Performers suspended assumptions, thoroughly reviewed all available instructions/background research and actively sought out any available expert input.
 

Evidence for Finding 2: Senior teams or functional experts generally did worse in the game than expected and junior teams/non-functional experts generally did better than expected.


As people become more experienced and competent they often become more fixed on their "Golden Rules" ("this always works" or "never do this"). [These] can also close people down to a fresh examination of the facts available to them.

In many cases the evidence which was available would have directly challenged these golden rules if it had been properly and objectively evaluated.


Read the full post  for more.


Related posts by Deb:

      


   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is an insightful list of provocative high performance team insights, different than the usual laundry list of "strong leadership," "stable teams," and, of course, a certain measure of "trust."  ~  D

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Djebar Hammouche's curator insight, September 4, 2013 12:06 PM
6 Findings: High performance team Leadership and Decision Making
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High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio

High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
It's the secret to high-performing teams -- and strong marriages.


The research, conducted by academic Emily Heaphy and consultant Marcial Losada, examined the effectiveness of 60 strategic-business-unit leadership teams at a large information-processing company.



________________________

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams,..
.was the ratio of positive comments to negative comments...nearly six positive comments for every negative one.

________________________


"Effectiveness" was measured according to financial performance, customer satisfaction ratings, and 360-degree feedback ratings of the team members.

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams, Heaphy and Losada found, was the ratio of positive comments

  • ("I agree with that," for instance, or "That's a terrific idea") 

to negative comments 

  • ("I don't agree with you" "We shouldn't even consider doing that") that the participants made to one another. 
The average ratio for the highest-performing teams was 5.6 (that is, nearly six positive comments for every negative one).

The medium-performance teams averaged 1.9 (almost twice as many positive comments than negative ones.)

_________________________

..Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.
_________________________

But the average for the low-performing teams, at 0.36 to 1, was almost three negative comments for every positive one.

...Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.

Perhaps that's why we have found with the vast majority of the leaders in our database, who have no outstanding weaknesses, that positive feedback is what motivates them to continue improvement. In fact, for those in our database who started above average already (but are still below the 80th percentile), positive feedback works like negative feedback did for the bottom group.

Focusing on their strengths enabled 62% of this group to improve a full 24 percentage points (to move from the 55th to the 79th percentile). 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

First scooped to the Art and Science of Motivation, it also belongs in the Performance category.  Enjoy! ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 1, 2013 8:18 PM

This refers to some classic research from M. Losada & Heaphy on connectivity in high performance teams.  This research about positive and critiquing feedback ratios (and the volume of the positive feedback) seems right on target from the 1998 studies.  ~  Deb

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Top Challenges Facing Organizations over the Next Decade - SHRM perspective

Top Challenges Facing Organizations over the Next Decade - SHRM perspective | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Is there REALLY a talent shortage?

Yes...a very controversial topic...some say we do, others wonder how we could have a shortage with such high unemployment.

....About the same number of qualified candidates apply for the job... mixed in with 20 applications or 200 applications....with only 1 or 2 of them fully qualifying.


Top trends?

According to the SHRM survey. With 483 HR executives reporting, here are what they say (just a few of the results)...


________________________

...to the employee, the supervisor IS the organization...

________________________


1.  Retaining and rewarding the best employees
... they show up, very excited to begin their new endeavor, disappointed to find that the pay raises are inadequate, employee morale is low, gossip is high, integrity is questionable, workload is greater than expected, and overall a work environment that is not employee-friendly.

... It may not be an organizational issue...it may be isolated to the supervisor. ...to the employee, the supervisor IS the organization...and if that is what they experience, that is what they will use as the basis to find new employment and to tell other people about their experience with your organization.

2.  Developing the next generation of corporate leaders
...We often wait to train employees until they are in the management position...which sets us behind as the new employees typically don't have the tools they need to be successful from the start.


....By providing a development plan a couple years out, we can train up and coming managers the right way. ...more than simply creating a succession matrix... identify individuals who can fill those future roles.

3.  Creating a corporate culture that attracts the best employees to the organization


4.  Remaining competitive in the talent marketplace



___________________

....it is EASIER to develop current talent than to find new talent. 

___________________



5.  Finding employees with the increasingly specialized skills we need
...a steady decline in STEM students (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) and STEM related positions. We are also lacking in other skills that typically set us apart in the United States...such as problem solving, leadership, decision making, competitiveness, etc.


....it is EASIER to develop current talent than to find new talent. This goes back to ...finding the core talent that already exists in the organization and developing it further for additional roles. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Is it about coming in with the skills needed (the talent shortage?) our about hiring for capability and capacity?  

It's good to see what SHRM provides from trend surveying and put it in perspective with other data, including hiring, succession management (not just a matrix), motivation science (not as evident here), pay and culture.  ~  D

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