Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Why Are We Managers So Poor at Feedback? It’s Like Trying to Explain How to Use a Towel to a Fish

Why Are We Managers So Poor at Feedback?  It’s Like Trying to Explain How to Use a Towel to a Fish | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Is the manager’s most important job to give feedback to employees? ....Study after study point to managers who are poor at giving feedback as the major reason why performance appraisals fail.


Excerpts:

"...most managers are so poor at it which means the feedback is infrequent, poorly timed, of poor quality, or all three."

Sibson Consulting reports that HR professionals are frustrated because managers don’t give constructive feedback and 58% of HR professionals give their number one feedback tool, the annual performance review, a C grade or below. 


Study after study point to managers who are poor at giving feedback as the major reason why performance appraisals fail.


...[The] ..four big reasons (barriers) why feedback is poorly done now:


  • …what managers call feedback is not feedback at all. It is criticism. Feedback is data from a process that is used for learning.
    
  • Second, current HR polices require managers to give the feedback. Why not give employees the ability and autonomy to collect their own data? ... Why not provide autonomy and trust to employees instead?
    
  • Third, the work environment most often discourages open and honest feedback. …How can managers give feedback to something they can’t see?
    
  • Fourth, most managers intuitively know….Attempting to provide feedback on the behaviors of employees without studying the entire system (the context) is like trying to explain how to use a towel to a fish.
   
Related posts by Deb:
      
Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

       

From Chaos to Creative Performance Development in a VUCA World (One that is Volatile, Uncertain, Chaotic and Ambiguous) - Slideshare

        


photo:  by deepwarren Flickr cc 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This helpful article points to the systemic source of problems in performance appraisals and feedback.  It also implies that data and business intelligence have a bigger role that managers could help happen.  

Getting data in the hands of those who could best use it for, direct, untainted, well-timed feedback relieves managers of a burdensome, low-value task and empowers them to direct data tools to where they can do the most good.  ~  Deb

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Classic: The Top 50 Problems With Performance Appraisals

Classic:  The Top 50 Problems With Performance Appraisals | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

 In 1996, Frederick Nickols estimated the cost at just under $2,000 per employee. ...includ[ing] manager preparation time, employee time, HR processing time, opportunity costs, and advances in technology, still puts the process cost at over $2,500 per employee per year.

Partial list of the 50 Problems cited.


Most Serious Performance Appraisal Problems


1. Don’t assess actual performance — most of the assessment that managers complete focuses on “the person,” including characterizations of their personal “traits” (i.e. commitment), knowledge (i.e. technical knowledge) or behaviors (i.e. attendance). While these factors may contribute to performance, they are not measures of actual output. If you want to assess the person, call it “person appraisal.” Performance is output quality, volume, dollar value, and responsiveness.


2. Infrequent feedback – At the very minimum, formal feedback needs to be given quarterly, like the GE process.


3. Non-data-based assessment — most assessment criteria are “fuzzy” and subjective.


4. Lack of effectiveness metrics — many accept that the goals of the process are to recognize results, provide feedback to address weaknesses, determine training needs, and to identify poor performers. Unfortunately, rarely do process owners ever measure their processes’ contribution to attaining any of these goals. Instead, the most common measure relating to performance appraisal is the percentage completed.


5.  Lack of accountability – ...One firm attempting to remove a troublesome employee found that the manager had rated the individual the highest within the department and awarded them employee of the year.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The comments on this blog post are also very helpful.  Look at Robert Bacal's contributions in particular, as well as consider the recent, "Beyond Performance Management"book that delves into the "Why" of any system including performance management.  ~  D

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