Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Social Business Tools Are Transforming the Way We Work & Give Feedback

Social Business Tools Are Transforming the Way We Work & Give Feedback | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Social business, the use of social network platforms for workplace communication and collaboration, is new... ...Some businesses are harnessing the power of social platforms to facilitate workplace productivity.


__________________
   
Consider the transformation when co-workers replace one-to-one emails with group collaboration.
   

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... first entries include Yammer, Rypple, and NationalField in 2008. Saba released its first social networking solutions for HR in 2009, and Mango Apps, 7Geese, and Globoforce came along in 2010.


Yammer, acquired by Microsoft, originally described itself as “Facebook for business.” Rypple, bought by Salesforce.com and rebranded as Work.com, gives companies an online motivational and coaching tool. Globoforce invites supervisors and peers to encourage each other with positive feedback, including digital badges and rewards.

     

[These] tools of social business field are leading to a new level of organizational transparency.   ...Consider the transformation when co-workers replace one-to-one emails with group collaboration on a social platform. A worker in Charlotte asks a question, a colleague in London answers, a team member in Shanghai provides clarification, and many other employees are brought along for the ride. With social tools, employees pool their knowledge and get the work done.
      

Social tools also act as new platforms for performance appraisals that are relevant and positive in real time. Work.com offers the option of anonymous feedback, which the company says is easier to give and receive. Saba’s Pulse funnels social feedback into a company’s formal review process. Adobe Systems, on the other hand, has done away with traditional performance reviews and has replaced it with its own new platform, Check-In, for informal real-time responses.

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

     

    

  

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Be careful what you ask for, you just might get it.  Those staffers who've asked for more transparency from their administrators, could find themselves out in the open, ready to shine or ready to run away once social collaboration fully meets the light of day.  

I for one am very curious to learn of how Adobe Systems, using Check-in, may be making progress with reinventing performance review and dealing with the problems of individualistic feedback, as all of us work as part of a system, reference, W. Edward Deming's "Red Bead Experiment."  Stay tuned, it may be a bumpy ride, and it could be a transformation of better understanding human performance is in store.  ~  D 

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Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"We often don't sense the invisible chains of entrenched habits until poets, reformers and provocateurs start asking questions."


A century later, any leader today is well served to at least acquaint himself with Deming list to better understand what continues to plague corporate performance today.


Excerpted, four of the seven:

 

The Seven Deadly Diseases of Management


1.   Lack of constancy of purpose to plan product and service that will have a market and keep the company in business, and provide jobs.


2.  Emphasis on short-term profits: short-term thinking (just the opposite from constancy of purpose to stay in business), fed by fear of unfriendly takeover, and by push from bankers and owners for dividends.


3.   Evaluation of performance, merit rating, or annual review.


4. Mobility of management; job hopping.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

See the full post here to view a fresh new video on the roots of performance appraisal, (3rd century, really!) and clues for what to do about it today:

 Clues for What's Next in "A History Performance Appraisal."


It also features yours truly.  ~  Deb

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Kohn, Herzberg and Pay: Challenging Behaviorist Dogma

Kohn, Herzberg and Pay:  Challenging Behaviorist Dogma | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Alfie Kohn's contribution to performance management, Pay-for-Performance and performance based organizations is well said in this short paragraph featuring the classic work of Frederick Herzberg, author of, The Motivation to Work.


Excerpt:


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The jazziest, most expensive and elaborate comp system ever devised can never do anything other than ...take you only to the baseline, the zero point.
 

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Frederick Herzberg's career was devoted to proving the following revolutionary principle: just because paying people inadequately can be demotivating doesn't imply that paying people better (or more skillfully) will be motivating.


The jazziest, most expensive and elaborate comp system ever devised can never do anything other than prevent some problems.


It can take you only to the baseline, the zero point. And if you become preoccupied with the topic, it can distract you from attending to what can move an organization forward -- projects such as meeting people's needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence

From:  articles by alfie kohn


Photo:  by 401(K) 2013 Flickr


Related articles by Deb:

    


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I have been convinced about Kohn's approach through my experience of seeing what makes the difference in large, complex organizations.  

Setting the "stars" or "community" question aside, based on hire-fire values, what really creates motivation is never, ever, ever going to be first about the pay for most people in the long view.  


Unless you happen to not mind, or prefer turnover and churn in the ranks, this point of view is worth a serious look in research as well as performance and talent development decision making.  ~  D

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Let's Invert the Performance Review

Let's Invert the Performance Review | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"...even well-executed performance reviews are glaringly one-sided."


Performance reviews ...[are] ...a great opportunity to synchronize manager and employee expectations, jointly set goals, and evaluate progress toward those goals. If you're a manager and not doing these things, you might as well skip the review process -- and reconsider whether you're fit to be a manager.


But even well-executed performance reviews are glaringly one-sided. They review employee performance on terms set by their managers. Why don't we see the reverse: employees reviewing the performance of their managers?


...Invert the performance review. Make the primary focus upward rather than downward.


Reasons:

  1. It's usually harder to judge managerial performance than individual contribution. Individual contributions mostly have tangible, attributable results. In contrast, managerial performance is largely reflected in how the team perceives the manager.

  2. Managers are key reason that employees decide whether to stay at a company or quit. 

  3. Without a formal review process, it's easy for managers to not get meaningful feedback from their employees. 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I wish I had a nickel for every suggestion I've received over the years for upward performance review of managers.   It's an evergreen request only implemented, in a limited way, through multi-rater feedback.   Still, systemically, it's worth inclusion on this curation stream because


1) It's mentioned as an idea, seemingly new;


2) It's an article on LinkedIn, a large, professional network;


3) It makes the point about execution problems and 360 feedback;


4) It relates to team performance.  Managers are often connected to a team concept of all those needed to execute on a goal successfully, especially those who report to them;


5) I'm a big fan of any Dilbert comic on this topic.


Best, ~  Deb

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Innovation vs. Measurement & Systems: Leadership Is Always The Key

Innovation vs. Measurement & Systems:  Leadership Is Always The Key | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Think of “win-lose” structures in incentives.  If you can only win if someone else loses, what are the odds of your developing a working relationship grounded in trust?"

Trust:

Strong leadership can recognize “win-lose” structures or norms and work to eliminate them.  It seems obvious that leadership drives trust, not systems.


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Without ...systems ...built to allow for ...individual and group failure, risk will always be a negative organizational value. 


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DIVERSITY:      . . . of people, points of view, ideas, ethics, and beliefs.  Diversity is what drives and powers iteration, constant challenge, testing, playing, and randomness. Strong leadership will drive (or diminish) diversity much more profoundly than will the most deeply embedded systems.  


RISK:     Risk tolerance and the attractiveness of rapid iteration are the hallmarks of innovative organizations.  Without operational systems that are built to allow for and to contextualize individual and group failure, risk will always be a negative organizational value.


...Should you be thinking a little more about how you encourage and foster strong leadership, and a little less about your systems of measurement and evaluation.?  You might be surprised by where this reflection will take you.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is also shared here via Performance and Talent Development because of the theme of leadership above performance systems, and leadership to build an innovation, adaptive culture that trumps traditional measurement practices. ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 5, 2013 8:20 PM

The venture capitalist who wrote this post has a view I share on putting measurement and evaluation within the right context, including a certain tolerance for enough risk-taking to help organizations be adaptive and "anti-fragile." ~  Deb

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Talent Development: Do We Need HR Departments?

Talent Development:  Do We Need HR Departments? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

If HR doesn’t deliver some unique benefits then outsourcing it makes a lot of business sense.


Other companies, however, have invested in the ‘people function’. They realize that they need people who ensure that the company finds, recruits, retains and develops its people. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author's provocative article has stimulated 1000+ comments in just a few days.  How HR is viewed is also a reflection or microcosm of the clarity and integrated condition of the company's mission, vision, performance approach and culture of valuing (or not valuing) people.

From the commentary on this piece, 'before we talk about all the strategic HR staff, no one will listen or care unless you pay them right."   I find this to be true in my own work with performance management over the years.

Good structure, fair compensation, and HR not overstepping its bounds providing performance management "advice" is important.  


~ Deb

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A New Approach - Changing the Annual Performance Review

A New Approach - Changing the Annual Performance Review | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Tired of the traditional annual performance review? Try this fresh approach focusing on delivering goals and great conversations." 


Excerpted key conversation points:

 

  1. The 3-5 Core Deliverables of the Role—...the bigger impact areas that the role makes on the department or business. For smaller companies...revenues, costs, customer satisfaction, or operational performance.
  2. The 3-5 Biggest Achievements—what ...made a difference, measurable.
  3. The 3-5 Personal Characteristics You Most Appreciate— elements of how someone performs that makes their work better...sense of humor, efficiency, cost-consciousness, loyalty, and directness are all examples of characteristics I have used in assessing this category.
  4. The 3-5 Goals for the the Company or Department—...a chance to discuss contributions that the person can make....support [or] direct role...connect the dots.
  5. The 3-5 Biggest Challenges Anticipated for the Next Period—Great brainstorming discussions....a great strategy and planning opportunity.


...You can conduct this conversation after an assignment, prior to a promotion or change in role, or even quarterly. However you decide to use it, I suggest you write it out first, then discuss it with your team members.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The disclaimer with this post shows the integrated nature of traditional appraisal systems:   "Some organizations are very particular about their review system, particularly when it is linked to compensation. ...HR ...may be reluctant to try a new ...process. ....discussion with them beforehand about which process works best for your business."


In my own experience with many different departmental review systems, I noticed the most interest, engagement and utility of a performance review came when compensation was delinked or reduced to a "soft" - dotted line - link.   ~  Deb

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The Pros And Cons Of Forced Rankings: A Manager's Perspective

The Pros And Cons Of Forced Rankings: A Manager's Perspective | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

...on Forbes.com there's been a spirited dialogue around the controversial management technique known as "stacking," or forced ranking. Here's one manager's reasoned, hands-on perspective."


An article in Vanity Fair by Kurt Eichenwald (“Microsoft’s Downfall: Inside The Executive E-mails and Cannibalistic Culture That Felled A Tech Giant”) triggered recent discussion.  Forbes subsequently featured posts including

 



These...touched a chord in the business community...generat[ing]  ...close to 400,000 readers and well over 300 reader comments. 


As a manager with MassMutual Financial Group (a well respected Fortune 500 company), I did see some benefits to forced ranking, though in the end I felt these benefits were outweighed by the managerial problems it caused. 


  • The system did force managers to have hard conversations with employees that they might otherwise have avoided.   ... In a forced ranking system, managers – and employees – have no place to hide.  It literally forces performance issues to be addressed; for an organization that wants to tighten or formalize its management processes, I believe the system can have benefits.

  • it caused employee morale problems.  While the system I managed in was intended to help promote closer linkage between job performance and bonus payouts –...it often felt like the cure was worth than the disease.   As a manager, the discussions I had over many years about the fairness of bonus payouts were not nearly as problematic as those I routinely came to have over end-of-year rankings.  






Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This perspective is similar to my own experience in the trenches working with managers and HR / OD clients updating or implementing their performance systems.  

The pros and cons are aptly described.  The size of an organization and it's cultural state determine what a forced ranking system will do, ultimately, to performance overall.  


A comment by Dick Grote, a performance management consultant and well-known author on the topic,  (pro-forced ranking with appropriate conditions) is this:  


  • "Forced ranking, used well, has the power to be the most beneficial management procedure an organization can adopt—for the company and its employees alike."


Forced Ranking or "Vitality Curve" systems may have power for a performance "clean-out."  However, what is the lasting nature of that power?  Is is enough to make a forced ranking system worth the Return on Investment (ROI) with the focus being only individuals?

Another point of view from a comment on this excerpted blog post is that,


  • "Team-oriented organizations provide more flexibility, consistency, and growth than organizations based on individual performance."


~ D

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Instead of Performance Appraisal, Encourage Self-Appraisals & Accountability

Instead of Performance Appraisal, Encourage Self-Appraisals & Accountability | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
For performance management to truly be effective accountability must be present...in the form of ...self-accountability driven by authentic, accurate self-assessment.

[How to] promote adaptive, constructive behavior and performance with the goal...for the employee to recognize his role

The manage ...can reinforce the employee's efforts by offering incremental reinforcement as incremental gains are made.

Self-assessment factors to explore:

Communication contributions 
  • What messages do I send?
  • How do I offer them?
  • What communication skills do I employ?
  • To what extent do I seek and offer feedback during communications?

Perceptual lens 

  • To what extent do my motives, values, interests, attitudes, past experiences, current expectations, etc. color or affect my behavior?
  • How can I gain insights about these factors to behave differently?

Role expectations 

  • What aspects of my role (e.g., tasks, responsibilities, boundaries, parameters, etc.) influence my behavior? What can I do manage these role expectations so that my behavior is more constructive?

Work area norms 

  • What beliefs or assumptions exist within my work area or team that impact the way I behave?
  • What latitude do I have, as an individual, in ways that reflect my unique perspective?

Organizational culture 

  • In what kind of organizational setting do I work? 
  • What does the organization (and its leaders) say about the vision, mission, and values we are to uphold and pursue? 
  • How does my behavior compare with these espoused elements?

Ultimately, both managers and employees need to realize the simple fact that people differ in the way they perceive the world.
Photo:   Photo, credit to Konrad Glogowski, Flickr.com CC
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

When you are in it, you can't see it.  Teaching and reinforcing self-assessment can help us grow out of that big blind spot.  

The research photo, credit to Konrad Glogowski on Flickr, provides self-assessment guidance transferable to self-assessment and self-appraisal in performance setting.  


Use such an approach at the beginning of any review cycle.  


Provide easy-to-use supporting tools for data gathering and review.  ~ D

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