Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 



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See the companion post about Holacracy, here.

           

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
        

          

      

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Harold Jarche highlights several useful models featuring two way information flow through power and authority. which helps build, if the culture allows it, adaptability into knowledge work.  


As quoted in the article, much of this work has been "routinized and standardized with the ongoing marriages of business processes and integrated enterprise information systems."  This makes for a fragile system susceptible to disruption.  

Building robust, two-way flows is essential to enable adaptability to the realities of continuous change and learning organizations ready to embrace disruption.  ~  D

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Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:46 PM

well worth the reading time.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2014 2:23 PM

I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

~  Deb

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Actions Speak Loudly: Corporate Values that Mean Nothing

Actions Speak Loudly:  Corporate Values that Mean Nothing | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"What does your company stand for? Go ahead, look around you; check out the published mission or values statement. Take a moment to read it. Now do a gut check.  ... Did you disdainfully roll your eyes?"


Here’s a thought: what if every time leaders did something counter to their company’s values, their noses grew? Like the famed puppet Pinocchio, ...when a misguided decision was flying in the face of what your company stands for?


Whimsical, yes, but wouldn’t it be effective? The offenders would be immediately called out to account for their actions.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Often truth telling, calling espoused values to consciousness when bossism and "rank and yank"  (forced distribution of performance reviews), poor management skills, and other bossisms  emerge is a risky business, especially in non-profits, known for low investments in leader and manager performance development.


Dilbert actually has done one, if not more "nose growing" comic strips dealing with the misalignment of values and management / leader actions.    

Who's courageous enough to call these out?   Does it happen in your organization?   ~  Deb

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What's Deadly about Workplace Hierarchy, Developing Performance

What's Deadly about Workplace Hierarchy, Developing Performance | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

“[Hierarchies] are not very good at mobilizing effort, at inspiring people to go above and beyond.” Gary Hamel   ...hierarchy is a relic. ...It slows communication...decision-making...input. It discriminates against new talent and advocates for the familiar. .....Fresh ideas are stifled in hierarchies.
 

Hierarchies were useful to control employees when they could be easily replaced. Today it takes more than holding a job to motivate employees. They want to unleash their strengths, apply their passions and work alongside others who do the same

In time, rigid hierarchies...controlled by personality at the top will be outdone by nimble organizations that give power to teams. This ...shift gives the competitive advantage to businesses that leverage the collective talents of their people. ...organizations cannot thrive...with outdated structures that celebrate the individual at the top of the pyramid.
    

It’s more than seeking employees’ inputs, however. Replacing hierarchy means putting employees at the table co-creating solutions with managers, if they exist, to drive business results.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Performance and talent management systems tend to exist now embedded in hierarchical systems.  Talent & performance development requires something quite diffferent, unhinged from industrial age systems, as the author implies. ~  D

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10 Ways to Change Performance Management Circa 2013 ~ Bacal

10 Ways to Change Performance Management Circa 2013 ~ Bacal | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Ten shifts that are necessary to modernize and update how we manage performance.


Excerpts:


1) Negotiating Goals and Objectives, Not Dictating


3) Individualizing Expectations Even For Employees Doing The Same Job

Each person ....bring their unique strengths to the job. So, people in the same position often do quite different things, and should be ...recognized for their unique contributions.


4) Managers Understand Employee Engagement Can Be Fostered Through Proper Management of Performance

Performance management is THE tool to help establish meaning of work, because it helps employees understand how their jobs fit into the whole.


Managers need to understand, also, that the reliance on rating forms for evaluation is a waste, and tends to squash employee engagement.


8) Recognize Employee Performance Is Not Always Under Their Control and Focus On The System

...much ...of what employees do is dictated and influenced by the environments they work in. ....discuss ALL barriers to employee performance, ...and move to remove those barriers.


9 ) Human Resource Departments Need To Enable Managers, Not Insist On Conformity

Human Resources (HR) needs to enable managers by providing them with a variety of tools, rather than dictate a one-size-fits-all system that is imposed upon managers and staff.


- See more at: http://performance-appraisals.org/Bacalsappraisalarticles/articles/tenways.htm#sthash.NdhA5cod.dpuf


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've been following Robert Bacal for more than a decade.  For those ready to begin to take initial steps to let go of outdated performance practices that have low ROI, this is a helpful site and guide.  

He is also of the ilk of behaviorists including Aubrey Daniels.

For those who want to make the big leap, Robert Bacal's approach would be more incremental change, not transformational.    For those perspectives, stay tuned.  


~  Deb

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Classic: The Top 50 Problems With Performance Appraisals

Classic:  The Top 50 Problems With Performance Appraisals | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

 In 1996, Frederick Nickols estimated the cost at just under $2,000 per employee. ...includ[ing] manager preparation time, employee time, HR processing time, opportunity costs, and advances in technology, still puts the process cost at over $2,500 per employee per year.

Partial list of the 50 Problems cited.


Most Serious Performance Appraisal Problems


1. Don’t assess actual performance — most of the assessment that managers complete focuses on “the person,” including characterizations of their personal “traits” (i.e. commitment), knowledge (i.e. technical knowledge) or behaviors (i.e. attendance). While these factors may contribute to performance, they are not measures of actual output. If you want to assess the person, call it “person appraisal.” Performance is output quality, volume, dollar value, and responsiveness.


2. Infrequent feedback – At the very minimum, formal feedback needs to be given quarterly, like the GE process.


3. Non-data-based assessment — most assessment criteria are “fuzzy” and subjective.


4. Lack of effectiveness metrics — many accept that the goals of the process are to recognize results, provide feedback to address weaknesses, determine training needs, and to identify poor performers. Unfortunately, rarely do process owners ever measure their processes’ contribution to attaining any of these goals. Instead, the most common measure relating to performance appraisal is the percentage completed.


5.  Lack of accountability – ...One firm attempting to remove a troublesome employee found that the manager had rated the individual the highest within the department and awarded them employee of the year.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The comments on this blog post are also very helpful.  Look at Robert Bacal's contributions in particular, as well as consider the recent, "Beyond Performance Management"book that delves into the "Why" of any system including performance management.  ~  D

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Top Challenges Facing Organizations over the Next Decade - SHRM perspective

Top Challenges Facing Organizations over the Next Decade - SHRM perspective | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Is there REALLY a talent shortage?

Yes...a very controversial topic...some say we do, others wonder how we could have a shortage with such high unemployment.

....About the same number of qualified candidates apply for the job... mixed in with 20 applications or 200 applications....with only 1 or 2 of them fully qualifying.


Top trends?

According to the SHRM survey. With 483 HR executives reporting, here are what they say (just a few of the results)...


________________________

...to the employee, the supervisor IS the organization...

________________________


1.  Retaining and rewarding the best employees
... they show up, very excited to begin their new endeavor, disappointed to find that the pay raises are inadequate, employee morale is low, gossip is high, integrity is questionable, workload is greater than expected, and overall a work environment that is not employee-friendly.

... It may not be an organizational issue...it may be isolated to the supervisor. ...to the employee, the supervisor IS the organization...and if that is what they experience, that is what they will use as the basis to find new employment and to tell other people about their experience with your organization.

2.  Developing the next generation of corporate leaders
...We often wait to train employees until they are in the management position...which sets us behind as the new employees typically don't have the tools they need to be successful from the start.


....By providing a development plan a couple years out, we can train up and coming managers the right way. ...more than simply creating a succession matrix... identify individuals who can fill those future roles.

3.  Creating a corporate culture that attracts the best employees to the organization


4.  Remaining competitive in the talent marketplace



___________________

....it is EASIER to develop current talent than to find new talent. 

___________________



5.  Finding employees with the increasingly specialized skills we need
...a steady decline in STEM students (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) and STEM related positions. We are also lacking in other skills that typically set us apart in the United States...such as problem solving, leadership, decision making, competitiveness, etc.


....it is EASIER to develop current talent than to find new talent. This goes back to ...finding the core talent that already exists in the organization and developing it further for additional roles. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Is it about coming in with the skills needed (the talent shortage?) our about hiring for capability and capacity?  

It's good to see what SHRM provides from trend surveying and put it in perspective with other data, including hiring, succession management (not just a matrix), motivation science (not as evident here), pay and culture.  ~  D

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TestOps Tech: Beginning a New Trend in Performance Management with Cloud Data

TestOps Tech: Beginning a New Trend in Performance Management with Cloud Data | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

DevOps and TestOps?  If you are curious or if the jargon rings a bell, here's one of the newest trends in data and measurement, relating to Performance Management on the tech side of the topic.


Excerpted:  


DevOps has attracted a lot of attention, and boasts plenty of successes already. TestOps is even newer and less well-understood--but is on course to bring its own advantages.


 in my own career, I’ve battled against silos that also isolate such other domains as Training and Support. Sometimes there are good reasons....certainly there are few organizations which put them on the same level during planning.


A tiny but growing number, though, are exploring “TestOps”, which, at its most aggressive, claims that “[t]esters are uniquely qualified to lead the way to a more nimble enterprise.


TestOps remains so small that there is no Wikipedia entry [yet.]  [And yet]...it’s a common term of art within Microsoft and a few other large industry players.


...If you’re in any field with objective success criteria, though, and especially if the cloud is the basis for at least part of your infrastructure, it’s time for you to explore how to make the most of TestOps principles.


Photo source:  What is DevOps?


Via Riaz Khan
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This post is the tech systems/macro side of performance management - similar to two perspectives on what change management really is, by definition.  Measurement criteria (objective success criteria, success factors, etc.) is the Achilles Heel of performance management success, both choice of measures and process.  Get it right, and talent and performance management can be a mighty force.  ~  D

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Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools & Why?) Change, Lean, 6 Sigma & more

Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools & Why?) Change, Lean, 6 Sigma & more | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

  • "What problem are we trying to solve?” 

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This helpful review highlights the framework that helps good and great performance happen with individuals, teams and in companies:  Choosing the best tools (and I'd add the best processes / change flow) at the right time to deliver right results.  

I bought the book and am reading it with great interest, as it is one of the few newer books that systemically look at  performance infrastructure.


This new book on the performance and talent management front seems to get it right including it's ambitious scope of trendy tools.   I'm reading it now and will share if it does or doesn't deliver.  ~  D

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:07 AM

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 4:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 3:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!
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The SILOS: Integrated Talent Management, What Is It and Why Should You Want It?

The SILOS:  Integrated Talent Management, What Is It and Why Should You Want It? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Start with three (3) well-intended but ineffective scenarios of siloed talent management.  Add in, organizations are still struggling to understand what integrated talent management is."


Elements 

  • Talent Management Processes Are Aligned to the Talent Strategy
  • Talent Management Processes Share Inputs and Outputs 
  • Competency Model as a Common Language
  • Technology Enablement for Talent Management
  • Change Management as a Foundation

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Integrated lessons being learned here:  Do-able?   Any take-aways for smaller organization looking to avoid performance and talent snafus in building their systems? ~  Deb

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Maya Mathias's curator insight, June 8, 2013 8:00 PM

If talent management is silo-ed, no wonder our workflow and throughput is too.  Organizations need to speak the same talent management language, and align their hiring/training/rewarding/firing goals with overall corporate strategy.  If a big organization like GE can do it (based on popular literature), there's no excuse for the rest of us!

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, August 5, 2013 12:18 AM
Getting the language clear (well-defined, accessible) helps a great deal, as well as seeing who is doing it well. Thanks for the comment Maya
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Hire & Fire is Different at Holacracy®-Powered Companies

Hire & Fire is Different at Holacracy®-Powered Companies | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
In a typical top-down management structure, the power to hire and fire employees is generally in the hands of managers.


With the decentralization of authority, the separation of people and role, and the dynamic evolution of those roles, [its] more like free agents going about their work with no central planning.  This then begs the question: who can decide how and when to hire or fire?


Holacracy doesn’t answer that question; it simply gives you a framework and processes for your company to figure it out. 


Brian Robertson — designed a 3-Tier Partnership App to answer a different question: “How can we account for the difference between partners deeply committed to the organization, and those for whom the commitment is lesser and more temporary?”


  • It separates “partnership commitment” from financial compensation.
    
  • It defines three tiers of partners: Standard Partner, Tenured Partner, and Core Partner. Each tier requires a higher level of commitment to the organization, and in return offers a higher level of commitment from the organization.
     
  • It was designed for a relatively small organization.
    
   

Related posts & tools by Deb:



                
       

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Social media is an artifact of a new age, choice driven, commitment oriented.  Holacracy is at the cutting edge of how this looks in adaptive organizations that thrive on flatter, open structures.   It's an open question:  Will it scale?


Comparing and contrasting holacracy used at a biggger company, Zappos, is on my companion Change Leadership Watch ScoopIt here entitled:


Zappos is going Holacratic: No Job Titles, No Managers, No Hierarchy

~  Deb 

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No More Criticism, No Advice: Emotions Drive Achievement & Performance ~ Classic

No More Criticism, No Advice:  Emotions Drive Achievement & Performance ~ Classic | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

This classic article "Escape from the Red Zone" has very current ideas.  "Peter Naylor and Claire Crittenden have a revolutionary approach in their Seven Practices listed in this article about confronting the business world's last taboo: emotion."


Excerpts:


People are motivated by either "red" emotions -- anger, fear, greed -- or "green" emotions -- genuine enthusiasm and confidence. Either ...gets results. Yet one set of emotions ...slowly destroys people; the other can actually improve people's quality of life.


__________________________


Flattery, advice, criticism, and motivation rob workers of their freedom and ignore the...emotional current ...between manager and subordinate

__________________________


...All organizations in the contemporary world manipulate emotion, warp it, force it into the red zone...   A few, and only a few, are struggling to get well.


...Their alternative model for organizational life and the politics of emotion has simple ground rules:

  • No flattery. 
  • No advice. 
  • No criticism. 
    

...No telling people how to do their jobs -- outside of a genuine training environment. Never. At all. Period.

        

__________________________

   

Recognize achievement, let the numbers speak for themselves. 
   

__________________________


...Flattery, advice, criticism, and motivation rob workers of their freedom and ignore the essential emotional current that runs through encounters between manager and subordinate," Naylor says.   Nine times out of ten, that emotional current is red: a Molotov cocktail of anger and fear, grounded in feelings of subjugation.


_______________________
 

If you do this over a period of time -- design and validation -- people will be transformed."

_______________________



..."The problem is, people don't want to be responsible. But when you give advice, who now has the responsibility? Anyone here ever heard of empowerment? If you do this over a period of time -- design and validation -- people will be transformed."

    

Excerpts from the seven (7) practices that make it work:

    


1. Don't give advice, explore emotions.   ...ask, "How do you feel about this?" Keep asking it, adding only, "Gee, that's interesting, tell me more." ...Later it's appropriate to return to problem-solving mode -- even if it's only 15 minutes later.

    


2. Don't set goals; design outcomes.   Envision a "product" for every project, something tangible.   ....Clarify...product, the actions, the benefits. Get them down on paper.


     


3: Never criticize, only validate.   Do it on paper, in tangible, solid form. Recognize achievement, let the numbers speak for themselves. 

  


Source:   "Escape from the Red Zone" featuring Peter Naylor and Claire Crittenden by writer David E. Dorsey In Fast Company magazine.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This classic article from the 1997 is worth a second look today.  The connection to brain science is very current.

I also think emotion and beliefs / the spiritual are both the last taboos in business  (belief / the spiritual via an example in  Theory U and Otto Scharmer.)   


I've also posted this piece on my Motivation curation stream.   It's relevant for anyone who has a work relationship with anyone else.

 ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, October 29, 2013 1:20 PM

This is a classic article from the 90's who time has come.  You've probably heard that all buying is emotional?   This article brings it into the heart of organizational, team and personal performance.  It's a revolutionary approach that needs a wider audience.  Hopefully, it will get one.   


I found the article because I had been searching for the "fire hydrants" story for awhile.  I remembered reading it in the 90s.  The trail led me back to find this FastTimes article.  ~  Deb

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Three Reasons Performance Management will Change in 2014 & Beyond

Three Reasons Performance Management will Change in 2014 & Beyond | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Key Change for High Performance? => An agile, social and mobile work environment."


Excerpted:

Activity lists are being replaced by composite dashboards, lengthy reports by simple performance heat maps – yes, pictures, literally replacing thousands of words.


____________________________

A shift in focus from process to outcomes. Burn the forms.

____________________________


Key Change for High Performance?


A shift in focus from process to outcomes. Burn the forms. With technology finally up to the task of producing meaningful information, managers can turn their attention to driving performance outcomes rather than being bogged down in laborious processes.


Excerpted:

  • You will set dynamic goals and adjust them in response to change;
   
  • your manager will provide just-in-time coaching wherever you are;
   
  • skills and knowledge you need will be recommended and streamed to you;
   
  • your performance journal will continuously capture and cluster feedback, ideas and suggestions from your peers and customers;
   
  • your formal annual performance review will be permanently deleted from your calendar…and
    
  • you will finally be in a position to manage your own career.

 

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full version of the Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

   
     

 

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Refresher:  There's hope that the old management activities of the past, tied to Taylor's industrial age, are finally waning, aiding letting go of the annual performance appraisal aided by useful tech tools like "heat maps."  ~  D

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Performance Review: I'll try harder! I'll try smarter! Humor

Penny is under-performing at work. Typical Penny.  "About those lunch breaks,"  I don't think it's working out,"  "You've said this before."  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The script is classic.  It is well-known to managers and HR staff who are following progressive discipline.  So it is aboiut more than a peformance review, tongue in cheek, perhaps about highing younger and younger?  (You think?)

Besides the humor, it is about evidence and pattern, the script, and emotional sidetracks.   ~  Deb

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Out of the Chaos: Talent and Performance Management Meets HCM with a Cool Tablet Tool

Out of the Chaos:  Talent and Performance Management Meets HCM with a Cool Tablet Tool | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

The biggest miss for most organizations in the previous chaos was the connection between their workforce management, payroll, or HCM systems and their recruiting, succession, development, and planning processes.


 ...the ability to physically integrate a series of talent management processes on a proprietary but open platform device is potentially (bold mine, DN) a game-changer, 


At its annual customer forum this week, Ceridian  ...threw its hat into the integrated talent management ring, and from a strong position. ...Ceridian is rolling out more strategic, less transactional modules over the next couple of years, including succession planning, compensation and rewards, and performance management.


Related posts by Deb:

    
   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Systems are developing to a higher level than just record keeping & financials.  Analytics lessons from social media, e.g. Google, Facebook and YouTube analytics, have paved a path to get good as well as in-depth (Google) information, data input tools (devices) and data feedback to people.


IS this a GOOD thing?  Welll....  It may simply be the same old, same old repackaged into a shiny app on a tablet.  Success Factors is the partnership with Ceridian on the tool. 

The video on Ceridian's website features their payroll & timekeeping functions mainly.  It's pretty spiffy, for that. ~  D

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Four Major Flaws of Force Ranking - i4cp

Four Major Flaws of Force Ranking  - i4cp | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Forced Ranking or "The Vitality Curve" -  This isn't comparing apples to apples; it's like comparing apples to bacon.

The chart above are the results from a recent i4cp study on performance rankings, published in  Performance Management Playbook: Managing Critical Performance Challenges, showing a sharp decline in both forced rating and forced ranking since 2009.  

  • Two-thirds of companies that did utilize these practices abandoning them - from 49% in 2009 to 14% in 2011.
  
i4cp's list of shortcomings of force ranking includes:
 

Companies unwittingly give a huge boost to the competition.

..when Microsoft jettisons their presumed lower-performing employees, they are providing the competition with fresh talent

   

The bottom 10% isn't always the bottom 10%.

An employee who is in the bottom 10% in a high-performing department might rank much higher when compared to employees in a different department that has lower overall performance. Why should that employee be let go when he or she outperforms those in other fucntions? This isn't comparing apples to apples; it's like comparing apples to bacon.

   

Forced ranking can be an engagement and innovation killer.
    
Related posts by Deb:

     

   




Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Dick Grote is still touting forced rankings (in a modified way, but still rank & remove) in his articles and books on performance appraisal and performance management.  

The i4cp consulting group offers reasons why it's not working in 2012.  ~  D

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Performance Management ~ Change the Focus, The Hooper-Bacal Method

Performance Management ~ Change the Focus, The Hooper-Bacal Method | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

It doesn’t rely on ratings...  Some annual documentation — some kind of formal performance review process [is a formality.)  That is one of Robert Bacal's suggested changes on what to de-emphasize in performance management.


In the Hooper-Bacal Method, this was a formality, never surprising the employee or the manager. The “forms” were so insignificant in the process that I can’t even recall what they were — certainly not those awful rating forms.


The meetings were, once again, short, sometimes as little as fifteen minutes, and while the mere phrase “performance review” created some anxiety, for the most part, once employees “got” that it wasn’t a case of being shocked by bad news, the annual review became a much more comfortable process.


Photo:  Billso on Flickr.com CC


- See more at: http://work911.com/wp/?p=10551#sthash.LNgEhYtZ.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Eliminating the traditional single manager-driven ratings is one big step in the right direction.

I used Robert Bacal's approach (putting the emphasis in through the year data collection, not end of year appraisal) for many years, helping business departments and organizations design a process that would work for them, including unionized environments.  


His is a useful website rich with seasoned perspective on improving or eliminating aspects of flawed appraisal practices.


~  Deb

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Replacing Performance Appraisal with Better Practices

Replacing Performance Appraisal with Better Practices | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"The annual performance appraisal [does NOT] actually increase performance. So, what should replace them?  There are three strategic resources to replace the performance appraisal system:


  1. Key Predictive Indicators for Knowledge Workers
  2. The Manager’s Letter
  3. After-Action 



_____________________
    
Better to be approximately relevant rather than precisely irrelevant.

_____________________


Knowledge work is not defined by quantity, but quality; not by its costs, but results. The traditional tools of measurement need to be replaced by judgment. And there is a difference between a measurement and a judgment: a measurement requires only a scale; a judgment requires wisdom.

   

....So many leaders worry that if they get rid of objective measures, they will introduce subjective bias into the decision-making process. So what? To get rid of bias we would have to give up emotions and discernment, which is too high a price to pay. Neurologist Antonio Damasio has studied brain-damaged patients, demonstrating that without emotion it is impossible to make decisions.

    

Admittedly, the following KPIs raise rather than answer questions, but at least they raise the right questions. Better to be approximately relevant rather than precisely irrelevant. Enlightened organizations allow their team members to decide which of the following KPIs are most important to track and develop.



Related posts by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is rich, practical post is also listed with "Innovation and Institutions"  since any organization that successfully dispenses with this deeply flawed practice is innovating indeed.  


So many leaders are reluctant to take this step under the guise of wanting to believe the metrics tied to appraisal are fully valid.  It's doubtful they are if subjective managers are making the call.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 15, 2013 3:42 PM

This is a wonderfully rich post on how to set forth good alternatives to this dreaded and deeply flawed practice.  It features how to get on the right path with "practical suggestion(s) to hold people accountable for their future contribution..."  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 16, 2013 9:41 AM
From a Google+ post discussion with Vince: I think most metrics involving human beings are rife with subjectivity under the guise of objective measurement.

In my experience working with organizations designing their perf. mgmt. processes, there was a year that a business had minimal salary to distribute for the yearly program. They decided to do across the board increases with adjustments (those paid under a certain amount had a bigger increase.) They also, that year, completely severed the performance appraisal and salary link. Result: The performance review conversations completely changed. For the first time, staffers asked for additional time to complete the year end discussion, using it to really build understanding and plan for the year ahead (feed forward concept.)

If there was one business practice that would do much better, "resting in pieces," it would be performance "management." 
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Fractured Technology: Undermining Trust & Ownership?

Fractured Technology: Undermining Trust & Ownership? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Despite a substantial ...research showing that giving employees more autonomy and control leads to productivity growth, the UK in the last decade has been moving in the opposite direction."

 

Oxford professor Duncan Gallie and his colleagues found strong evidence of declining ‘task discretion’ and a significant reduction in autonomy in UK jobs.

 

Similarly, researchers Michael White and Stephen Hill suggest that while employees may have more freedom to decide how they deliver their targets, employers operate more rigorous regimes of accountability through sophisticated performance management systems and extensive surveillance.

 

Both studies show some workers have less control in their jobs than a decade ago, and that the use of IT in the workplace is one of the key areas for the erosion of autonomy. 


Via Fabrice De Zanet, donhornsby
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Is this big data gone bad?  Don't be that organization.  

In the book, "The Charge," successful entrepreneur Brendon Burchard comments, "the team and project-based work dynamic causes many of us to act in ways that actually impair our ability to learn."  

This stream will be about searching out ways to instill positive, systemic practice that support talent development to the fullest.  ~  Deb

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 10, 2013 7:17 AM

(From the article): So technology pulls in two directions – sometimes reducing autonomy, sometimes stimulating creativity. Perhaps in workplaces where there is already a climate of distrust or cynicism, technology will be met with distrust, if the apparent liberty of ‘always-on technology’ leads to the tyranny of ‘always-on work’.

Laurence Dubuc's curator insight, May 10, 2013 8:49 AM

IT in the workplace: the autonomy of the worker seems to be challenged by heavier surveillance mecanisms, such as Big Data, 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 10, 2013 6:43 PM

We have choices, including deciding where you choose to focus your job search or entrepreneurial - intraprenuerial work, such as to include or NOT include a company that uses Big Data this way.  ~  Deb