Flawed Performance Management and Hospital Consultants Don't Mix > Insights to Change | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"...improvements envisaged by the Department were achieved but that’s because its objectives were absurdly unambitious."  


Does this sound like a hobbled performance management system to you?  From "An open blog enabling commentators from across secondary care to share their opinions."


Excerpts:


“A new contract which increased consultants’ pay by between 24% and 28% failed to halt a continuing decline in productivity. Many of the improvements envisaged by the Department were achieved but that’s because its objectives were absurdly unambitious.


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The use and quality of annual appraisals in trusts are patchy.

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“The contract allows consultants to refuse to work during evenings and weekends. As a result, hospitals struggle to provide the appropriate level of consultant-led care for patients. Some trusts even pay up to £200 an hour for additional work which is done at weekends.


“The use and quality of annual appraisals in trusts are patchy. Seventeen per cent of consultants have not had an appraisal in the last year. It is also startling to hear that nearly half of trusts do not assess whether consultants have met the objectives in their job plans.


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..half of trusts do not assess whether consultants have met the objectives in their job plans.

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“Pay progression for consultants is linked to years in the job rather than how well they are performing. And Clinical Excellence Awards, costing £500 million a year and aimed at rewarding consultants whose performance is over and above what is normally expected, are held by 60% of consultants.


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...This nonsense highlights how badly consultants’ performance is being managed.

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“This nonsense highlights how badly consultants’ performance is being managed. A proper culture of performance management for consultants and other NHS staff must be implemented if we are to avoid incidents of poor performance.


“Despite the increased pay, there is still a shortage of consultants in some parts of the country, in hospitals in deprived areas and in specialities such as geriatric medicine. This makes some trusts reliant on locum consultants, who provide less continuity of care for patients as well as being more expensive for the NHS.


Excerpts:  By Mike Broad - 3rd July 2013


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