Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from New Work, New Livelihood, Careers
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3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Leadership today has evolved greatly.  Our systems for supporting high performance and leadership in teams and in entire organizations has not kept up with the times."


See the article, SlideShare and videos here.

Excerpts:

At a recent workshop with JVS in Southfield Michigan, I shared some of the research and practical organization experience I’ve collected on high performance teams.
 


As we hear of findings and new development from “big data” AND “small data” (highly personalized, tracked), it is also good to explore how access to performance data can inform leadership at all levels and encourage team achievement and speed, especially when old practices that slow and interfere with performance are removed.


Also keep in mind the differences between true teams vs. psuedo-teams  and groups.  Many project and task groups are assembled as teams to accomplish a charge or purpose.    Sometimes these groups or teams: 

  • produce an innovation or breakthrough success for their organizations,
  • are formed based on a favorite interest or pet project idea of an executive that, in hindsight, provides limited value to their organization.    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Besides research, this article includes my  interview findings of what stops performance dead in its tracks, including fresh insights from an interview of a millennial, a 25 year old, describing her work experience after graduating from college in 2010.    ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:39 PM

This is one of my own posts featuring research on emotional space in high performance teams as well as the positivity / negativity ratios in such teams.   What do you think?  ~  Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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What Can Swarms Teach Us About Teams and High Performance?

What Can Swarms Teach Us About Teams and High Performance? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Do you want your organization to behave in a more collaborative way? For better results, try taking some cues from nature."


The notion of “swarming” to assemble a cross-functional or cross-departmental team, could be considered a key factor in an organization’s ability to develop and thrive.


Gartner described a work swarm as a “flurry of collective activity” to deal with non-routine workplace problems or opportunities. Without this option, organizations can fall short in their quest to respond to stressors (or opportunities) in quickly changing internal and external environments.


....Building a pipeline of talent is imperative with swarming – but this should be developed in a manner that is meaningful. Mapping the skills and strengths of potential team players within relevant industries, becomes a critical goal.


Furthermore, teaming applications (like Jostle), can also help document the evolving skill sets of potential contributors.


Related posts by Deb:


    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you want to jump start an exploration of swarming, look at large group methods  that are swarm friendly, including Open Space Technology - photos here.


Also, this article reminds me of the Membership, Control, Goal simple model that helps create movement & synergy in a team.


I'm encouraged by organizations looking seriously into swarming support and creating more  permeable boundaries around formerly rigid roles.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 22, 2013 10:23 AM

Agile Learning include teams including flexible, adaptable conditions, vs. more rigid hierarchies, that allow teams to develop.  ~  D

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:07 AM

A post that gathered interest  right away on the Talent and Performance Development curation stream.  Note the key aspect, "non-routine" workplace problems or opportunities. "


Don't we all have these?  Are we ready to respond to non-standard events, "anti-fragile?"


From  Talent and Performance Development, which also features recent articles on performance metrics and management (reinvention.)

~  Deb 

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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6 Game Findings: High Performance Teams > Leadership & Decision Making

6 Game Findings: High Performance Teams > Leadership & Decision Making | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"6 critical differences between top performers and the rest in the areas of leadership and decision-making."


Finding 1: Top Performers avoided the "Presumption of change" trap.

Evidence for Finding 1: Even though the game starts with each team inheriting a business from the previous executive team 95% of the participants showed no curiosity regarding how successful the previous leadership team had been and why!


...almost all new leaders focus on what they need to change but not what they need to preserve.


What to change is only part of the challenge and for whatever reason (ego, identity, peer pressure ...) showing a lack of respect for the previous team's achievements seems to be a good predictor of sub-optimal performance.


Finding 2: Top Performers suspended assumptions, thoroughly reviewed all available instructions/background research and actively sought out any available expert input.
 

Evidence for Finding 2: Senior teams or functional experts generally did worse in the game than expected and junior teams/non-functional experts generally did better than expected.


As people become more experienced and competent they often become more fixed on their "Golden Rules" ("this always works" or "never do this"). [These] can also close people down to a fresh examination of the facts available to them.

In many cases the evidence which was available would have directly challenged these golden rules if it had been properly and objectively evaluated.


Read the full post  for more.


Related posts by Deb:

      


   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is an insightful list of provocative high performance team insights, different than the usual laundry list of "strong leadership," "stable teams," and, of course, a certain measure of "trust."  ~  D

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Djebar Hammouche's curator insight, September 4, 2013 12:06 PM
6 Findings: High performance team Leadership and Decision Making
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Science and Art of Motivation
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High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio

High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
It's the secret to high-performing teams -- and strong marriages.


The research, conducted by academic Emily Heaphy and consultant Marcial Losada, examined the effectiveness of 60 strategic-business-unit leadership teams at a large information-processing company.



________________________

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams,..
.was the ratio of positive comments to negative comments...nearly six positive comments for every negative one.

________________________


"Effectiveness" was measured according to financial performance, customer satisfaction ratings, and 360-degree feedback ratings of the team members.

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams, Heaphy and Losada found, was the ratio of positive comments

  • ("I agree with that," for instance, or "That's a terrific idea") 

to negative comments 

  • ("I don't agree with you" "We shouldn't even consider doing that") that the participants made to one another. 
The average ratio for the highest-performing teams was 5.6 (that is, nearly six positive comments for every negative one).

The medium-performance teams averaged 1.9 (almost twice as many positive comments than negative ones.)

_________________________

..Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.
_________________________

But the average for the low-performing teams, at 0.36 to 1, was almost three negative comments for every positive one.

...Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.

Perhaps that's why we have found with the vast majority of the leaders in our database, who have no outstanding weaknesses, that positive feedback is what motivates them to continue improvement. In fact, for those in our database who started above average already (but are still below the 80th percentile), positive feedback works like negative feedback did for the bottom group.

Focusing on their strengths enabled 62% of this group to improve a full 24 percentage points (to move from the 55th to the 79th percentile). 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

First scooped to the Art and Science of Motivation, it also belongs in the Performance category.  Enjoy! ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 1, 2013 8:18 PM

This refers to some classic research from M. Losada & Heaphy on connectivity in high performance teams.  This research about positive and critiquing feedback ratios (and the volume of the positive feedback) seems right on target from the 1998 studies.  ~  Deb