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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Science and Art of Motivation
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No More Criticism, No Advice: Emotions Drive Achievement & Performance ~ Classic

No More Criticism, No Advice:  Emotions Drive Achievement & Performance ~ Classic | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

This classic article "Escape from the Red Zone" has very current ideas.  "Peter Naylor and Claire Crittenden have a revolutionary approach in their Seven Practices listed in this article about confronting the business world's last taboo: emotion."


Excerpts:


People are motivated by either "red" emotions -- anger, fear, greed -- or "green" emotions -- genuine enthusiasm and confidence. Either ...gets results. Yet one set of emotions ...slowly destroys people; the other can actually improve people's quality of life.


__________________________


Flattery, advice, criticism, and motivation rob workers of their freedom and ignore the...emotional current ...between manager and subordinate

__________________________


...All organizations in the contemporary world manipulate emotion, warp it, force it into the red zone...   A few, and only a few, are struggling to get well.


...Their alternative model for organizational life and the politics of emotion has simple ground rules:

  • No flattery. 
  • No advice. 
  • No criticism. 
    

...No telling people how to do their jobs -- outside of a genuine training environment. Never. At all. Period.

        

__________________________

   

Recognize achievement, let the numbers speak for themselves. 
   

__________________________


...Flattery, advice, criticism, and motivation rob workers of their freedom and ignore the essential emotional current that runs through encounters between manager and subordinate," Naylor says.   Nine times out of ten, that emotional current is red: a Molotov cocktail of anger and fear, grounded in feelings of subjugation.


_______________________
 

If you do this over a period of time -- design and validation -- people will be transformed."

_______________________



..."The problem is, people don't want to be responsible. But when you give advice, who now has the responsibility? Anyone here ever heard of empowerment? If you do this over a period of time -- design and validation -- people will be transformed."

    

Excerpts from the seven (7) practices that make it work:

    


1. Don't give advice, explore emotions.   ...ask, "How do you feel about this?" Keep asking it, adding only, "Gee, that's interesting, tell me more." ...Later it's appropriate to return to problem-solving mode -- even if it's only 15 minutes later.

    


2. Don't set goals; design outcomes.   Envision a "product" for every project, something tangible.   ....Clarify...product, the actions, the benefits. Get them down on paper.


     


3: Never criticize, only validate.   Do it on paper, in tangible, solid form. Recognize achievement, let the numbers speak for themselves. 

  


Source:   "Escape from the Red Zone" featuring Peter Naylor and Claire Crittenden by writer David E. Dorsey In Fast Company magazine.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This classic article from the 1997 is worth a second look today.  The connection to brain science is very current.

I also think emotion and beliefs / the spiritual are both the last taboos in business  (belief / the spiritual via an example in  Theory U and Otto Scharmer.)   


I've also posted this piece on my Motivation curation stream.   It's relevant for anyone who has a work relationship with anyone else.

 ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, October 29, 2013 1:20 PM

This is a classic article from the 90's who time has come.  You've probably heard that all buying is emotional?   This article brings it into the heart of organizational, team and personal performance.  It's a revolutionary approach that needs a wider audience.  Hopefully, it will get one.   


I found the article because I had been searching for the "fire hydrants" story for awhile.  I remembered reading it in the 90s.  The trail led me back to find this FastTimes article.  ~  Deb

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Science and Art of Motivation
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High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio

High Performance Teams (and Marriages): The Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
It's the secret to high-performing teams -- and strong marriages.


The research, conducted by academic Emily Heaphy and consultant Marcial Losada, examined the effectiveness of 60 strategic-business-unit leadership teams at a large information-processing company.



________________________

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams,..
.was the ratio of positive comments to negative comments...nearly six positive comments for every negative one.

________________________


"Effectiveness" was measured according to financial performance, customer satisfaction ratings, and 360-degree feedback ratings of the team members.

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams, Heaphy and Losada found, was the ratio of positive comments

  • ("I agree with that," for instance, or "That's a terrific idea") 

to negative comments 

  • ("I don't agree with you" "We shouldn't even consider doing that") that the participants made to one another. 
The average ratio for the highest-performing teams was 5.6 (that is, nearly six positive comments for every negative one).

The medium-performance teams averaged 1.9 (almost twice as many positive comments than negative ones.)

_________________________

..Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.
_________________________

But the average for the low-performing teams, at 0.36 to 1, was almost three negative comments for every positive one.

...Only positive feedback can motivate people to continue doing what they're doing well, and do it with more vigor, determination, and creativity.

Perhaps that's why we have found with the vast majority of the leaders in our database, who have no outstanding weaknesses, that positive feedback is what motivates them to continue improvement. In fact, for those in our database who started above average already (but are still below the 80th percentile), positive feedback works like negative feedback did for the bottom group.

Focusing on their strengths enabled 62% of this group to improve a full 24 percentage points (to move from the 55th to the 79th percentile). 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

First scooped to the Art and Science of Motivation, it also belongs in the Performance category.  Enjoy! ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 1, 2013 8:18 PM

This refers to some classic research from M. Losada & Heaphy on connectivity in high performance teams.  This research about positive and critiquing feedback ratios (and the volume of the positive feedback) seems right on target from the 1998 studies.  ~  Deb