Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Develop your Talent, Sponsor a Workshop during International Coaching Week in May

Develop your Talent, Sponsor a Workshop during International Coaching Week in May | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Experience timely, current workshop topics  during International Coaching Week ~  May 19-25, 2014  - sponsored by the International Coaching Federation (ICF).

Coach Café Ann Arbor is offering to selected local leaders pro-bono workshops and coaching from some of the top coaches in the Ann Arbor and South East Michigan area (Flint and Detroit included.)
 

Why? We want to create awareness of the return on investment of coaching, as well as offering to you new educational partnerships in a win-win opportunity.  


______________________
   
We must always change, renew, rejuvenate ourselves; otherwise we harden.
~ Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

______________________


Here’s the business case for professional coaching.  Of all clients who have engaged a coach,

  • 99% report satisfaction with the coaching experience,
  • 70% report improved work performance,
  • 80% report increased self confidence,
  • 68% individuals report financial return on investment,
  • 80% companies report financial return on investment.



For South East Michigan and Ann Arbor, check out our local website here featuring ICW sample workshops here.   See photos from last year here.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a great win-win talent development opportunity for your leaders, staff and faculty.  Coach, consultant biographies are also listed on the website and on the ICF Michigan website, as well as the national site for the International Coaching Federation.

Now is a good time to reach out to one of the coaches and plan some workshops and coaching demonstrations for this special May event.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2014 4:13 PM

Add freshness to your company workshops experience and coaching by local, professionals.  Contact a coach listed on the main, local website here:  http://coachcafeannarbor.weebly.com/

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Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google

Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

It’s simply harder to give difficult feedback than positive feedback or no feedback.  ...It creates tension.  However...70% of the time, it's worth it...


This interview with Karen May, vice president for people development at Google, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.


Excerpt:

    

If you’ve identified something that isn’t going well, then you’re likely to be asked, “How do I fix it?” If you don’t know the answer, you might not want to start the conversation. 


________________
    
People can do something with the feedback probably 70% of the time.

   

________________


As a coach, I was often in the position of giving people feedback they hadn’t heard before, after I interviewed a bunch of people they work with. It was always difficult for me, too.

    

....But I came to find that people are incredibly grateful. If I’m not doing well and I don’t know it or I don’t know why or I can’t put my finger on what’s not working and no one will tell me, I won’t be able to fix it.

   

...if you give me the information, the moment that the information is being transferred is painful, but then I have the opportunity to change it. I’ve come to realize that one of the most valuable things I could do for somebody is tell them exactly what nobody else had told them before.

     

Q. How often does that have a positive outcome?

    

A. People can do something with the feedback probably 70 percent of the time. And for the other 30 percent, they are either not willing to take it in, it doesn’t fit their self-image, they’re too resistant, in denial, or they don’t have the wherewithal to change it.

...the reality is that most change happens in small increments. So if you’re watching to see if someone’s changing, you have to watch for the incremental change. It’s not a straight line


Related posts by Deb:
     

A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture


Selecting a Coach: Connect, Clarify and Commit & 10 Questions to Ask Your Prospective Coach

      

The Pervasive Talent Myths Meet FLOW, Using Your Strengths

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is insightful from several perspectives:  that of helping people work through their blind spots, serving as a coach and NOT expecting to "fix it" as the key to the feedback.   There are alternative approaches to consider for feedback as well  (Escape from the Red Zone.)  

Ultimately, high performance and development requires an informed view of how to deal with feedback.   ~  Deb

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Sustaining Leadership Development: 7 Disciplines that Make it Work

Sustaining Leadership Development:  7 Disciplines that Make it Work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"What matters most is the impact of the leader's actions on others—not just the actions themselves or the rationale behind them." 

In the recent book,  Leadership Sustainability, (Pub. March 2013), authors Dave Ulrich and Norm Smallwood have defined seven leadership practices that instill sustainability:


Simplicity. Focus on what matters most. Tells stories with impact...

Time. Employees see what leaders do more than listen to what they say...

Accountability. Take personal responsibility for doing what you say you will do and hold others accountable as well. 

Resources. Get coaching and institutional support to become a better leader. 

Tracking. Measure what's important and not what's easy. Tie to consequences. 

Melioration. Master the principles of learning: to experiment frequently, to reflect always, to become resilient, to face failure, to not be calloused to success, and to improvise continually. 

Emotion. "Leaders who are emotionally vulnerable and transparent will be more likely to sustain change."


Read the full book review blog post by Leadership Now:  


http://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2013/06/seven_disciplines_that_make_le.html


Related posts by Deb:

   

     
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Dave Ulrich is well known in the top consulting circles and for incorporating Positive Organization Scholarship (POS) which is well represented by what he and his co-author include in their 7 top sustainability practices.  ~  Deb

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What is your Clock for Change? Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation

What is your Clock for Change?  Coaching with the iWam, Work Attitude & Motivation | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

This excerpt features the assessment tool, the iWAM, which reveals ‘change’ patterns as motivational patterns and shows us what our ‘Clock’ for change looks like.  iWam = the Inventory for Work Attitude & Motivation

The iWAM “Clock” answers the question ..."After how many years one needs a significant change to be motivated again?"

Learning about a top-performer’s need for change allows us to plan for the time when burnout would set in so that we can prevent it and retain our top talent.


The information from the Clock also helps us make better career decisions and work-life planning.


From the iWam website:


The iWam is based on a model of cognitive thinking styles (48 parameters are measured and explained). The iWAM Management Report identifies a person's motivational and attitude preferences in the job context and predicts how this person will behave in various job types, such as administrative, customer contact or managerial tasks.

The 
iWAM Attitude Sorter predicts key motivational preferences and development areas. The questionnaire can be administered over the Internet or as a pen-and-paper test. The iWAM is currently available in more than 15 languages. Test administration takes 25 to 45 minutes.


Source: http://www.theiwam.com/the-clock


Photo by deux-chi, Flickr


Related tools & posts by Deb:

    

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The iWam is a moderate to advanced assessment instrument that is useful for looking at work attitudes and motivation.  Samples of iWam reports are here


~ Deb

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Is Your Ego Killing Your Workers' Performance? Power & Team Performance Research

Is Your Ego Killing Your Workers' Performance? Power & Team Performance Research | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Though strong leadership has long been thought to be the key to an organization's success, new research suggests otherwise via a new study by researchers at the University of Michigan, Harvard and Duke


Excerpts:
 

"By doing most of the talking, powerful formal leaders conveyed a sense that they were not open to others' input, and this dynamic produced a lower level of team performance, as measured by the team's ability to reach their goals in the simulation," the authors wrote.


In another experiment, participants were divided into four-person teams and were asked to carry out an exercise in which reaching the right decision on a personnel issue depended on each group's ability to share information.

Half of the designated team leaders were prepared before the experiment with the power questions, and half were not. Additionally, half the leaders were reminded that all team members had the potential to contribute to the team's success.
 

The researchers found that not one of the teams with the "powerful" leaders who had not been reminded about team contributions reached the right decision, compared with more than half of the other teams.
 

"Feelings of power produce a tendency to devalue the perspectives, opinions and contributions of others," the authors wrote. "When leaders were reminded that all team members had the potential to contribute to the team's success, these effects did not emerge."


Related posts and research findings via Deb:

    
     

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Power easily disrupts team performance..  This research helps clarify the ongoing reminders of affects of hierarchy in corporate environments  ~ Deb

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