Talent and Performance Development
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Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Amazon’s Social Rift: Ongoing Rank and Yank and Work / Life Non-Balance, NYT Video

Amazon’s Social Rift: Ongoing Rank and Yank and Work / Life Non-Balance, NYT Video | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
The recent New York Times article about Amazon inspired an unprecedented online conversation about workplace stress.


This video features highlights of the thousands of comments posted on the web.


_____________________________
   
...[Amazon seeks]  to manage out a certain percentage of its work force annually. The number varies from year to year.


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From another New York Time article dated August 17th, 2015, is error about Amazon's performance culture:


An article by Amazon engineer, Nick Ciubotariu, was circulated by Amazon’s public relations department after The Times article was published. Mr. Ciubotariu describes strengths of the workplace, including focus on customers and innovation. He also wrote that “no one” was encouraged to “toil long and late,” and dismissed the concerns expressed by many women at the company, which does not include any women on its top leadership team.

    

His points contradicted the accounts of many former and current colleagues, and some of his assertions were incorrect, including a statement that the company does not cull employees on an annual basis. An Amazon spokesman previously confirmed that the company sought to manage out a certain percentage of its work force annually. The number varies from year to year.

 


Related culture & performance posts by Deb:

      

   
   
   



Photo credit:  Soumit Nandi Flickr Creative Commons

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This brief 30 second video (click on the title or photo or link) is definitely worth a look on what a very large, 21st century profit and high growth minded company with a competitive culture looks like.  Amazon also features a traditional, 20th century, performance "rank and yank" evaluation system. It is more euphemistically called the Vitality Curve, or as stated above, managing out a certain percentage of its work force annually.  

Rank and yank can be a welcome temporary purge to a company that struggling.  Organizations that are stuck in the past, burdened with lower performance staff, or other low performance ills have had some success with the "Vitality Curve. Yet for the company to use it consistently, rather than temporarily speaks volumes on what is important and not important at Amazon.  ~ Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 19, 2015 6:08 PM

This brief 30 second video is definitely worth a look on what a very large, 21st century profit and high growth minded company with a competitive culture looks like.  Amazon also features a traditional, 20th century, performance "rank and yank" evaluation system. It is more euphemistically called the Vitality Curve, or as stated above, managing out a certain percentage of its work force annually.  

While "rank and yank" can be a welcome temporary purge to a company that is stuck, burdened with lower performance staff, and so forth, to use it consistently, rather than temporarily speaks volumes on what is important and not important at Amazon.  


Also posted in Talent and Performance Development.  ~ Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools & Why?) Change, Lean, 6 Sigma & more

Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools & Why?) Change, Lean, 6 Sigma & more | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

  • "What problem are we trying to solve?” 

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This helpful review highlights the framework that helps good and great performance happen with individuals, teams and in companies:  Choosing the best tools (and I'd add the best processes / change flow) at the right time to deliver right results.  

I bought the book and am reading it with great interest, as it is one of the few newer books that systemically look at  performance infrastructure.


This new book on the performance and talent management front seems to get it right including it's ambitious scope of trendy tools.   I'm reading it now and will share if it does or doesn't deliver.  ~  D

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 2, 2013 1:07 PM

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 9:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 8:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!