Talent and Performance Development
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Talent and Performance Development
Making sense of performance and talent development systems to create & sustain high performance in organizations. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation, social media and careers, SUBSCRIBE to Reveln.com/Tools/
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Ditching performance reviews for annual conversations that really work

Ditching performance reviews for annual conversations that really work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Reimagining performance in organizations results in astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.  "There are alternatives, and it might be easier than you think."  This scoop summarizes how it works, from HopeLab. 

   

Excerpted:

     
"Like Adobe, we have also dismantled the traditional performance review and replaced it with ...the Annual Conversation... It's intended to inspire ...generative conversation about performance ...at a deeper level than might occur in regular supervision meetings throughout the year, " says Chris Marcell Murchison, Vice President Staff Development & Culture at HopeLab

 

________________
   
As a result, some staff, including managers, make astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.”

________________
   
   
  

Results   “Our staff look forward to their Annual Conversations and the impact on our culture has been profound. Employees report that they feel seen, heard, appreciated, and supported. As a result, some staff, including managers, make astounding leaps in focus, growth and productivity.”

    

How it works:

   

Questions We've created questions to help guide Annual Conversations. …We crowdsource questions from the entire organization and employees can add any questions they like to the basic list.


Examples include, 

"What are you working on when you feel the most purposeful? 

Why is this activity meaningful to you?" 

"What would you attempt to do in the next year if you knew you could not fail? 

    

Location Employees choose a location for the meeting.

    

Time …Typically most last anywhere from two to four hours.  …The manager and employee to decide what works best for them.

    

Non-evaluation The Annual Conversation is not an evaluation of past performance; it's a chance to reflect [and] understand… what's working and what's not, with an eye to setting future goals and enhancing growth and performance. There are no lgrades or performance rankings of any sort.

    

Merit …The Annual Conversation is not coupled to merit or incentive pay. These decisions are made separately and communicated outside the framework of the Annual Conversation.

    

Manager. There is nothing for her to prepare. [Her role is to] focus her attention on her direct report, listen, and ask questions to help deepen reflection.  

As for all Scoops, click on the photo or title to see the full article.

Related change & performance posts by Deb:

            

      

    

    
  • Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

             

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm hopeful in 2015 that more organizations will be able to make the commitment to a multiyear process of letting go of industrial age (inspection oriented, 20th century) performance practices to give practices like the Annual Conversation a try.  It's possible to jump even further away from a manager, individual employee model.  Find out more here.   ~  Deb

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Talent Development: Do We Need HR Departments?

Talent Development:  Do We Need HR Departments? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

If HR doesn’t deliver some unique benefits then outsourcing it makes a lot of business sense.


Other companies, however, have invested in the ‘people function’. They realize that they need people who ensure that the company finds, recruits, retains and develops its people. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author's provocative article has stimulated 1000+ comments in just a few days.  How HR is viewed is also a reflection or microcosm of the clarity and integrated condition of the company's mission, vision, performance approach and culture of valuing (or not valuing) people.

From the commentary on this piece, 'before we talk about all the strategic HR staff, no one will listen or care unless you pay them right."   I find this to be true in my own work with performance management over the years.

Good structure, fair compensation, and HR not overstepping its bounds providing performance management "advice" is important.  


~ Deb

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Navy SEAL Lessons For High Performance Teams

Navy SEAL Lessons For High Performance Teams | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Every person counts. And four other important rules to work by.


Excerpts:

Military culture is traditional, historically informed and fixed, whereas corporate cultures differ based on the leadership or other variables that oftentimes create challenges for employees at every level.


Military personnel have a clearly structured and transparent path to promotion, while in the world of business, there's often no defined career progression and the necessity for employees to manage their careers.


_____________________

Every SEAL knows with 100% confidence that the person behind him will be able to save his life. 

_____________________


It's clear that above all else, the Navy SEAL’s functional and effective teamwork is among one of its top strengths. SEAL insights could, and should, be applied to working teams in business.


Excerpts from the article:
 

Every person counts. 

Every SEAL knows with 100% confidence that the person behind him will be able to save his life. Corporate leaders need to be able to say the same about their management teams. Employees’ livelihoods depend on it.


SEALS train. 
When SEALs are not on combat deployment, they spend the vast majority of their time in training. In contrast, executives spend the majority of their time executing. The importance of training for new employees, or even a veteran team, is vital to the success of the business. Navy SEALs spend thousands of hours honing their skills, and so should employees in a profession.


Everyone is expendable. 
All SEALs are trained in a nearly identical manner, so no one SEAL is indispensable to the unit or the mission. The understanding during combat is that anyone can be lost at any time and the rest of the unit can carry on the mission successfully. Businesses need to ensure contingency plans are in place ...so the team can carry on without any delays.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's a different model for high performance.  From a place of tradition, it challenges corporate tradition.  Succession planning AND management are important.  Few have truly prepared for succession management.  ~  D

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Pay For Performance: Innovation Killer?

Pay For Performance:  Innovation Killer? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Talent Management magazine, The Business of Talent Management


Pay for performance is effective for employees in operational roles, such as a painter painting houses or a salesman hitting quotas. But when it comes to employees responsible for finding creative solutions to problems, the model is ineffective, said Gustavo Manso, co-author of a 2012 study published in the July issue of Management Science.


...a straight pay-for-performance model does not have a tolerance for early failure, a component essential to innovation, said Manso, an associate professor of finance at the University of California at Berkeley.


Innovation is a “trial and error process,” Manso said. “You have to try things that you don’t know if they’re going to work.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I scooped this originally to "Innovations & Institutions:  Will it Blend?" and am sharing it here due to the Pay and Performance theme. ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:08 PM

There are also cultural components to tolerance for failure.  


Also, performance and pay are linked in many, though not all performance systems.  It is how they are linked, (soft link, dotted line, one factor among others, or direct links / primary factor) that sends a message that affects extrinsic and instrinsic  (Alfie Kohn, cited), and churn (stay or go) in organizations. ~  D

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Classic, Systemic Performance Insight > Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance

Classic, Systemic Performance Insight > Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Why the best doctors are so good, and how the rest can learn to improve.  These are useful, classic lessons for all of us in better understanding performance, both individual and systemic.


Excerpts:


Gawande divides the essays into three sections — “Diligence,” “Doing Right” and “Ingenuity” — based on the components “for success in medicine or in any endeavor that involves risk and responsibility.”

Each essay focuses on a problem — the importance of hand-washing, health care delivery in India, the role of physicians in executions — that Gawande uses to anchor wide-ranging reflections.

...Gawande shows us that hand-washing turns out to be a profoundly complex and... that the moral obligations of physicians to death-row patients are not as clear as life and death, and that providing care to the poorest in the world takes a degree of ingenuity that should be categorized not simply as “better” but as downright heroic.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

         

              

      
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I highly recommend this well written collection of insightful performance stories.   

Gawande demonstrates how focusing on patients, performance and the big picture, the system, leads to improvement for people and the profession.    So much change fails, as he illustrates, without systemic intervention and peer-to-peer learning and engagement.

He uses history, story, numbers and his own experience to provide compelling insights useful to understanding systems thinking in performance.  

His early examples and accounts of of controlling infection in hospitals provides an excellent view of how difficult it is to make changes in systems, and that it also is possible, and heroic to affect change with the right approach as well as dogged determination. ~ D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 20, 2014 2:19 PM

The book isn't new, but its insights into improving performance is compelling in using case examples for how challenging it is to help  change take hold in complex, resistant to systems - even when the intent to change is strong. ~ D

Richard Platt's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:39 AM

This is also an excellent example of how to understand and create Use Cases.  


The original curator of this scoop, Deb from Revelyn Highly recommended this collection of insightful performance stories.  

Gawande demonstrates how focusing on patients, performance and the big picture, the system, leads to improvement for people and the profession.  

He uses history, story, numbers and his own experience to provide compelling insights useful to understanding systems thinking in performance.  His early examples and accounts of of controlling infection in hospitals provides an excellent view of how difficult it is to make changes in systems, and that it also is possible, and heroic to affect change with the right approach as well as dogged determination.

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Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google

Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

It’s simply harder to give difficult feedback than positive feedback or no feedback.  ...It creates tension.  However...70% of the time, it's worth it...


This interview with Karen May, vice president for people development at Google, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.


Excerpt:

    

If you’ve identified something that isn’t going well, then you’re likely to be asked, “How do I fix it?” If you don’t know the answer, you might not want to start the conversation. 


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People can do something with the feedback probably 70% of the time.

   

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As a coach, I was often in the position of giving people feedback they hadn’t heard before, after I interviewed a bunch of people they work with. It was always difficult for me, too.

    

....But I came to find that people are incredibly grateful. If I’m not doing well and I don’t know it or I don’t know why or I can’t put my finger on what’s not working and no one will tell me, I won’t be able to fix it.

   

...if you give me the information, the moment that the information is being transferred is painful, but then I have the opportunity to change it. I’ve come to realize that one of the most valuable things I could do for somebody is tell them exactly what nobody else had told them before.

     

Q. How often does that have a positive outcome?

    

A. People can do something with the feedback probably 70 percent of the time. And for the other 30 percent, they are either not willing to take it in, it doesn’t fit their self-image, they’re too resistant, in denial, or they don’t have the wherewithal to change it.

...the reality is that most change happens in small increments. So if you’re watching to see if someone’s changing, you have to watch for the incremental change. It’s not a straight line


Related posts by Deb:
     

A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture


Selecting a Coach: Connect, Clarify and Commit & 10 Questions to Ask Your Prospective Coach

      

The Pervasive Talent Myths Meet FLOW, Using Your Strengths

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is insightful from several perspectives:  that of helping people work through their blind spots, serving as a coach and NOT expecting to "fix it" as the key to the feedback.   There are alternative approaches to consider for feedback as well  (Escape from the Red Zone.)  

Ultimately, high performance and development requires an informed view of how to deal with feedback.   ~  Deb

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10 Ways to Change Performance Management Circa 2013 ~ Bacal

10 Ways to Change Performance Management Circa 2013 ~ Bacal | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Ten shifts that are necessary to modernize and update how we manage performance.


Excerpts:


1) Negotiating Goals and Objectives, Not Dictating


3) Individualizing Expectations Even For Employees Doing The Same Job

Each person ....bring their unique strengths to the job. So, people in the same position often do quite different things, and should be ...recognized for their unique contributions.


4) Managers Understand Employee Engagement Can Be Fostered Through Proper Management of Performance

Performance management is THE tool to help establish meaning of work, because it helps employees understand how their jobs fit into the whole.


Managers need to understand, also, that the reliance on rating forms for evaluation is a waste, and tends to squash employee engagement.


8) Recognize Employee Performance Is Not Always Under Their Control and Focus On The System

...much ...of what employees do is dictated and influenced by the environments they work in. ....discuss ALL barriers to employee performance, ...and move to remove those barriers.


9 ) Human Resource Departments Need To Enable Managers, Not Insist On Conformity

Human Resources (HR) needs to enable managers by providing them with a variety of tools, rather than dictate a one-size-fits-all system that is imposed upon managers and staff.


- See more at: http://performance-appraisals.org/Bacalsappraisalarticles/articles/tenways.htm#sthash.NdhA5cod.dpuf


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've been following Robert Bacal for more than a decade.  For those ready to begin to take initial steps to let go of outdated performance practices that have low ROI, this is a helpful site and guide.  

He is also of the ilk of behaviorists including Aubrey Daniels.

For those who want to make the big leap, Robert Bacal's approach would be more incremental change, not transformational.    For those perspectives, stay tuned.  


~  Deb

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Replacing Performance Appraisal with Better Practices

Replacing Performance Appraisal with Better Practices | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"The annual performance appraisal [does NOT] actually increase performance. So, what should replace them?  There are three strategic resources to replace the performance appraisal system:


  1. Key Predictive Indicators for Knowledge Workers
  2. The Manager’s Letter
  3. After-Action 



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Better to be approximately relevant rather than precisely irrelevant.

_____________________


Knowledge work is not defined by quantity, but quality; not by its costs, but results. The traditional tools of measurement need to be replaced by judgment. And there is a difference between a measurement and a judgment: a measurement requires only a scale; a judgment requires wisdom.

   

....So many leaders worry that if they get rid of objective measures, they will introduce subjective bias into the decision-making process. So what? To get rid of bias we would have to give up emotions and discernment, which is too high a price to pay. Neurologist Antonio Damasio has studied brain-damaged patients, demonstrating that without emotion it is impossible to make decisions.

    

Admittedly, the following KPIs raise rather than answer questions, but at least they raise the right questions. Better to be approximately relevant rather than precisely irrelevant. Enlightened organizations allow their team members to decide which of the following KPIs are most important to track and develop.



Related posts by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is rich, practical post is also listed with "Innovation and Institutions"  since any organization that successfully dispenses with this deeply flawed practice is innovating indeed.  


So many leaders are reluctant to take this step under the guise of wanting to believe the metrics tied to appraisal are fully valid.  It's doubtful they are if subjective managers are making the call.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 15, 2013 3:42 PM

This is a wonderfully rich post on how to set forth good alternatives to this dreaded and deeply flawed practice.  It features how to get on the right path with "practical suggestion(s) to hold people accountable for their future contribution..."  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 16, 2013 9:41 AM
From a Google+ post discussion with Vince: I think most metrics involving human beings are rife with subjectivity under the guise of objective measurement.

In my experience working with organizations designing their perf. mgmt. processes, there was a year that a business had minimal salary to distribute for the yearly program. They decided to do across the board increases with adjustments (those paid under a certain amount had a bigger increase.) They also, that year, completely severed the performance appraisal and salary link. Result: The performance review conversations completely changed. For the first time, staffers asked for additional time to complete the year end discussion, using it to really build understanding and plan for the year ahead (feed forward concept.)

If there was one business practice that would do much better, "resting in pieces," it would be performance "management."