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Talent and Performance Development
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Giving Feedback: Remembering the Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | HBR

Giving Feedback: Remembering the Ideal Praise-to-Criticism Ratio | HBR | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

The 5 to 1 ratio, "it’s the secret to high-performing teams — and strong marriages."  It's a classic feedback guide worth revisiting to do a self-check for the performance of your own business community.

Excerpt:   

The factor that made the greatest difference between the most and least successful teams, Heaphy and Losada found, was the ratio of positive comments: “I agree with that,” or “That’s a terrific idea”

to negative comments:  “I don’t agree with you,” and “We shouldn’t even consider doing that,” that the participants made to one another. Negative comments could go as far as sarcastic or disparaging remarks. 

 
The average ratio for the highest-performing teams was 5.6, nearly six positive comments for every negative one. The medium-performance teams averaged 1.9, almost twice as many positive comments than negative ones. Low-performing teams were at 0.36 to 1, almost three negative comments for every positive one.
     
The research, conducted by academic Emily Heaphy and consultant Marcial Losada, examined the effectiveness of 60 strategic-business-unit leadership teams at a large information-processing company. “Effectiveness” was measured according to financial performance, customer satisfaction ratings, and 360-degree feedback ratings of the team members.
    
Related posts by Deb, :

 

6 Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!


3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way  (Includes M. Losada research)


Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This research is very useful for peer feedback & teams, as well as leaders.  It helps organizations improve strategic and adaptive thinking, doing, as well as becoming more resilient and "antifragile.'  ~  Deb

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Never Say Never? Ratings & Frequency Scales for Performance Feedback

Never Say Never?  Ratings & Frequency Scales for Performance Feedback | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Take a second look at the validity of ratings, especially frequency scales for Performance including multi-rater feedback.


Excerpts:


[There are] …challenges of creating reliable/valid measurement when …relying on input …from observers of his/her behavior….[specifically] the rating scale that is being used.  


_______________________

    

“Always”....doesn’t mean they do it well.   …conversely...Rarely or Never doesn’t mean they are bad at it.

    

_______________________

     

…the rating scale’s effectiveness is likely to be directly affected by the quality of rater training….often neglected beyond …basic …written instructions. 

     

In [David Bracker's] webinar, [he] shared a list of a dozen or so various rating scales that I have encountered over the years, all in a 5 point format.  

     

…The 3D Groups recent benchmark study of over 200 organizations that use 360 feedback that, by far, the 5 point scale and the Likert Agree/Disagree format are used more often than any other scale type.  

    

…this practice is a form of laziness in 360 designers who haven’t reflected long or hard enough to consider scales that work better when the target is a specific person and not some nebulous entity like an organization [as with an] engagement survey.

    

….frequency scales (typically 5 point scales…ranging from Never to Always)…continue to be widely used…[and are] conceptually flawed. People can’t do everything “Always” (or even Almost Always…)  …because they do something “always” doesn’t mean they do it well.   …conversely, because they do it Rarely or Never doesn’t mean they are bad at it. 


______________________  

    

Frequency scales are used far too frequently.  They should be used Never.

    

______________________

    


...frequency scales severely penalize supervisors who do some things infrequently but are otherwise perceived to be effective.

     

…Research by Kaiser and Kaplan (2006) (that you can access here:http://kaplandevries.com/thought-leadership/list/C44)...demonstrate that frequency scales are, by far, less satisfactory when compared to Evaluative and “Do More/Do Less” scales.


Frequency scales are used far too frequently.  They should be used Never.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

David Bracker's post helps clarify a number of issues with performance ratings.
 

I’ve found in certain settings, a simple scale with description: Do more of, Stay the Same, Do Less of” with perhaps three to five items takes a group further, especially in “tender” groups, those who may have limited trust and openness. In such groups, making the “do less of” voluntary, helps to some degree, particularly if it is seen as an honest option, with no pressure to participate in “improvement” feedback.    ~  D

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Talent Development: Do We Need HR Departments?

Talent Development:  Do We Need HR Departments? | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

If HR doesn’t deliver some unique benefits then outsourcing it makes a lot of business sense.


Other companies, however, have invested in the ‘people function’. They realize that they need people who ensure that the company finds, recruits, retains and develops its people. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author's provocative article has stimulated 1000+ comments in just a few days.  How HR is viewed is also a reflection or microcosm of the clarity and integrated condition of the company's mission, vision, performance approach and culture of valuing (or not valuing) people.

From the commentary on this piece, 'before we talk about all the strategic HR staff, no one will listen or care unless you pay them right."   I find this to be true in my own work with performance management over the years.

Good structure, fair compensation, and HR not overstepping its bounds providing performance management "advice" is important.  


~ Deb

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Actions Speak Loudly: Corporate Values that Mean Nothing

Actions Speak Loudly:  Corporate Values that Mean Nothing | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"What does your company stand for? Go ahead, look around you; check out the published mission or values statement. Take a moment to read it. Now do a gut check.  ... Did you disdainfully roll your eyes?"


Here’s a thought: what if every time leaders did something counter to their company’s values, their noses grew? Like the famed puppet Pinocchio, ...when a misguided decision was flying in the face of what your company stands for?


Whimsical, yes, but wouldn’t it be effective? The offenders would be immediately called out to account for their actions.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Often truth telling, calling espoused values to consciousness when bossism and "rank and yank"  (forced distribution of performance reviews), poor management skills, and other bossisms  emerge is a risky business, especially in non-profits, known for low investments in leader and manager performance development.


Dilbert actually has done one, if not more "nose growing" comic strips dealing with the misalignment of values and management / leader actions.    

Who's courageous enough to call these out?   Does it happen in your organization?   ~  Deb

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Time Off, Development & Training is Less Important ~ It's about Whole Life at Work

Time Off, Development & Training is Less Important  ~ It's about Whole Life at Work | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"A study shows that work-life balance might not have much to do with employee engagement."

     

U.S. employees, despite their relatively poor work-life balance, are more emotionally invested and focused on creating value. Does that mean U.S. employees don't value work-life balance? Hardly.

According to a recent Glassdoor survey,

      

  • 72 percent of American employers feel that vacation, sick time, and holidays are extremely important to their job happiness, 
   
  • behind only health care (76 percent), which admittedly, is mostly a U.S. issue.
    
  • Only 27 percent of workers felt that development and training was an important workplace issue.


...What does this all mean? Probably that time off isn't truly as valuable to our happiness as we think it is, and ...meaningful work is more valuable.


______________________

time off isn't truly as valuable to our happiness as we think it is....meaningful work is more valuable.
 ______________________


Look for ways to say yes, give feedback, and encourage employees to contribute in meaningful ways. Don't manage by rules alone. Do these things, and you'll find you have an engaged workforce that does much better than most of those in the U.S.



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Meaningful work also means happiness at work.  In trying times, work is a lifeline to many.   That is why joblessness creates tremendous turmoil.  

Also Scooped to The Art and Science of Motivation.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 18, 2013 12:31 PM

Meaningful work translates to happiness in other definitions. That is why this is listed on a Motivation curation stream.  


Do you agree that meaningful work is #1 and that development and training is of lower value?   ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:55 PM

Are you investing in the right benefits for what really matters to your employees?  Meaningful work = happiness by other definitions. 


If meaningful work is #1 and development and training is of lower value, what are the implications for the talent in your organization?


From The Science and Art of Motivation news.  ~  Deb

Sharrock's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:14 PM

This kind of information has implications for knowledge work environments, including school classrooms. Staying engaged and motivated are two issues important in classrooms as well as in the training of staff.

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Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google

Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback by Karen May of Google | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

It’s simply harder to give difficult feedback than positive feedback or no feedback.  ...It creates tension.  However...70% of the time, it's worth it...


This interview with Karen May, vice president for people development at Google, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.


Excerpt:

    

If you’ve identified something that isn’t going well, then you’re likely to be asked, “How do I fix it?” If you don’t know the answer, you might not want to start the conversation. 


________________
    
People can do something with the feedback probably 70% of the time.

   

________________


As a coach, I was often in the position of giving people feedback they hadn’t heard before, after I interviewed a bunch of people they work with. It was always difficult for me, too.

    

....But I came to find that people are incredibly grateful. If I’m not doing well and I don’t know it or I don’t know why or I can’t put my finger on what’s not working and no one will tell me, I won’t be able to fix it.

   

...if you give me the information, the moment that the information is being transferred is painful, but then I have the opportunity to change it. I’ve come to realize that one of the most valuable things I could do for somebody is tell them exactly what nobody else had told them before.

     

Q. How often does that have a positive outcome?

    

A. People can do something with the feedback probably 70 percent of the time. And for the other 30 percent, they are either not willing to take it in, it doesn’t fit their self-image, they’re too resistant, in denial, or they don’t have the wherewithal to change it.

...the reality is that most change happens in small increments. So if you’re watching to see if someone’s changing, you have to watch for the incremental change. It’s not a straight line


Related posts by Deb:
     

A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture


Selecting a Coach: Connect, Clarify and Commit & 10 Questions to Ask Your Prospective Coach

      

The Pervasive Talent Myths Meet FLOW, Using Your Strengths

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is insightful from several perspectives:  that of helping people work through their blind spots, serving as a coach and NOT expecting to "fix it" as the key to the feedback.   There are alternative approaches to consider for feedback as well  (Escape from the Red Zone.)  

Ultimately, high performance and development requires an informed view of how to deal with feedback.   ~  Deb

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Managing Without Authority

Managing Without Authority | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

You are held accountable for results, but you can’t hold your people accountable. When they don’t meet expectations, you are the one who gets in trouble.


I’ve worked in organizations where this kind of frustration got so bad that managers resorted to fistfights. You could say they used crucial altercations instead of crucial conversations in their desperation to get performance back on track.


As you can imagine, these slugfests had the opposite effect. They stimulated cycles of retaliation and revenge.


...[This] taps  into a leadership concern that is nearly universal. ...As a leader, I’m given a heck of a lot more responsibility and accountability than authority. As a result, leaders are left managing without authority.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Perhaps authority and the role of management itself is changing. This is relevant, the emotion and anger, to the Escape from the Red Zone article Scooped below, referencing  Peter Naylor and Claire Crittenden.   The title starts with "No More Criticism..."  ~  Deb

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Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"We often don't sense the invisible chains of entrenched habits until poets, reformers and provocateurs start asking questions."


A century later, any leader today is well served to at least acquaint himself with Deming list to better understand what continues to plague corporate performance today.


Excerpted, four of the seven:

 

The Seven Deadly Diseases of Management


1.   Lack of constancy of purpose to plan product and service that will have a market and keep the company in business, and provide jobs.


2.  Emphasis on short-term profits: short-term thinking (just the opposite from constancy of purpose to stay in business), fed by fear of unfriendly takeover, and by push from bankers and owners for dividends.


3.   Evaluation of performance, merit rating, or annual review.


4. Mobility of management; job hopping.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

See the full post here to view a fresh new video on the roots of performance appraisal, (3rd century, really!) and clues for what to do about it today:

 Clues for What's Next in "A History Performance Appraisal."


It also features yours truly.  ~  Deb

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Is Your Ego Killing Your Workers' Performance? Power & Team Performance Research

Is Your Ego Killing Your Workers' Performance? Power & Team Performance Research | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Though strong leadership has long been thought to be the key to an organization's success, new research suggests otherwise via a new study by researchers at the University of Michigan, Harvard and Duke


Excerpts:
 

"By doing most of the talking, powerful formal leaders conveyed a sense that they were not open to others' input, and this dynamic produced a lower level of team performance, as measured by the team's ability to reach their goals in the simulation," the authors wrote.


In another experiment, participants were divided into four-person teams and were asked to carry out an exercise in which reaching the right decision on a personnel issue depended on each group's ability to share information.

Half of the designated team leaders were prepared before the experiment with the power questions, and half were not. Additionally, half the leaders were reminded that all team members had the potential to contribute to the team's success.
 

The researchers found that not one of the teams with the "powerful" leaders who had not been reminded about team contributions reached the right decision, compared with more than half of the other teams.
 

"Feelings of power produce a tendency to devalue the perspectives, opinions and contributions of others," the authors wrote. "When leaders were reminded that all team members had the potential to contribute to the team's success, these effects did not emerge."


Related posts and research findings via Deb:

    
     

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Power easily disrupts team performance..  This research helps clarify the ongoing reminders of affects of hierarchy in corporate environments  ~ Deb

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Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It! | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Looking for high performance in your organization?  Then take a good look at teams vs. groups.  Research findings about how work teams appear to be gaining in strength, and the communication patterns that help it happen.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is my own new blog posts on high performance team research.  It includes a handout on the differences between teams and groups or psuedo-teams, as well as research from several sources that help define what makes a real team as well as a high performance or "dream" team.  ~  Deb 

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How To Deal With A Bullying Boss

How To Deal With A Bullying Boss | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Are you a victim of workplace bullying? Here's what to do.


Excerpts:

Namie says confronting the boss is “rarely effective and ill-advised.” In early 2012, WBI asked 1,598 individuals who were personally familiar with workplace bullying what strategies they adopted to get their bullying to stop, and whether those actions were effective. Here’s what they said (excerpted):


  • About 38% of bullied employees essentially did nothing. In other words, he or she let time pass, hoping matters would improve on their own. Effectiveness of doing nothing: 3.25%

____________________

“Employers are responsible for all work conditions and the assignment of workers to supervisors..."

____________________
   
  • About 70% of employees directly confronted the perpetrator. Effectiveness of confronting: 3.57%
    
  • About 34% of bullied workers tried to find an attorney to file a lawsuit.    Effectiveness of finding an attorney: 11.2%
   

“Employers are responsible for all work conditions and the assignment of workers to supervisors,” Namie says. “So, employers can stop workplace bullying if they wanted to. 


No laws yet compel action or policies, so all employer actions would be voluntary.” About 68% of executives think workplace bullying is a serious problem—but few organizations (5.5%) are doing anything about it.

 

Related posts by Deb:


     

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article has great references and on-target strategies on a persistent problem in organizations.  Attention, prevention and intervention are key categories to making a dent in boss bullying.  


Note that, only 5.5% are doing anything about bullying, though almost 70% think it is a problem.  ~  Deb

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Brain Science: A Multitasking Video Game Makes Old Brains Act Younger

Brain Science:  A Multitasking Video Game Makes Old Brains Act Younger | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

by Matt Richtel


"Brain scientists have discovered that swerving around cars while simultaneously picking out road signs in a video game can improve the short-term memory and long-term focus of older adults. Some people as old as 80, the researchers say, begin to show neurological patterns of people in their 20s.

______________________

Some people as old as 80...begin to show neurological patterns of people in their 20s.

______________________

 


"Cognitive scientists say the findings, to be published Thursday in the scientific journal Nature, are a significant development in understanding how to strengthen older brains. That is because the improvements in brain performance did not come just within the game but were shown outside the game in other cognitive tasks.


"Further supporting the findings, the researchers were able to measure and show changes in brain wave activity, suggesting that this research could help understand what neurological mechanisms should and could be tinkered with to improve memory and attention."


Via Jim Lerman
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Useful and surprising findings on a good place for multi-tasking.  ~ Deb

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AnnC's curator insight, September 7, 2013 1:31 PM

Playing some videogames may help keep our brains young.

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Navy SEAL Lessons For High Performance Teams

Navy SEAL Lessons For High Performance Teams | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
Every person counts. And four other important rules to work by.


Excerpts:

Military culture is traditional, historically informed and fixed, whereas corporate cultures differ based on the leadership or other variables that oftentimes create challenges for employees at every level.


Military personnel have a clearly structured and transparent path to promotion, while in the world of business, there's often no defined career progression and the necessity for employees to manage their careers.


_____________________

Every SEAL knows with 100% confidence that the person behind him will be able to save his life. 

_____________________


It's clear that above all else, the Navy SEAL’s functional and effective teamwork is among one of its top strengths. SEAL insights could, and should, be applied to working teams in business.


Excerpts from the article:
 

Every person counts. 

Every SEAL knows with 100% confidence that the person behind him will be able to save his life. Corporate leaders need to be able to say the same about their management teams. Employees’ livelihoods depend on it.


SEALS train. 
When SEALs are not on combat deployment, they spend the vast majority of their time in training. In contrast, executives spend the majority of their time executing. The importance of training for new employees, or even a veteran team, is vital to the success of the business. Navy SEALs spend thousands of hours honing their skills, and so should employees in a profession.


Everyone is expendable. 
All SEALs are trained in a nearly identical manner, so no one SEAL is indispensable to the unit or the mission. The understanding during combat is that anyone can be lost at any time and the rest of the unit can carry on the mission successfully. Businesses need to ensure contingency plans are in place ...so the team can carry on without any delays.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's a different model for high performance.  From a place of tradition, it challenges corporate tradition.  Succession planning AND management are important.  Few have truly prepared for succession management.  ~  D

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Championing Limited Metrics and Low Power Culture: Results, High Profits

Championing Limited Metrics and Low Power Culture:  Results, High Profits | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Svenska Handelsbanken has championed an entirely different way of doing business, and has the profits, loyalty and longevity to prove that it works.

Three years ago, stock market analysts at Sweden’s main business paper set about using data from the London School of Business to find the world’s best performing share since the start of the 20th century.

The answer? Handelsbanken. Ten pounds invested in the Swedish bank in 1900 would have been worth about £20m by 2009, a rise of 1.9m pc. General Electric could manage only an 843,000pc rise.
 

And if you think the fruits of this astonishing return were limited to an elite club at the bank, you would be wrong.

Handelsbanken has an almost religious devotion to Oktogonen, its profit-sharing scheme. ...Every employee receives an equal share of the bank’s profits as long as it makes a return on equity greater than the average of its peer group.

   

__________________
   
..branches ....scrutinise [head office] costs. If they are not happy...they make sure the head office ups their game...

     
__________________

      

The money is then used to buy Handelsbanken shares for each staff member but these can be accessed only when employees reach the age of 60. This ultra-equitable approach means the bank teller whose career is spent cashing cheques will receive the same payout from Handelsbanken on retirement as its chief executive.


Afew other differences:


- It does not pay bonuses, with the exception of a small number of staff in its investment banking arm;
 

- It has no financial plans;
 

- The bank sets no sales targets for staff;
 

- It does not set out long-term goals and has no central marketing budget;
 

- Even its largest corporate customers must still bank with it at a branch level, and it has no credit scoring system.
 

...Anders Bouvin, UK chief executive explains....branches decide the costs of the head office. They scrutinise our costs. If they are not happy with the service, they make sure the head office ups their game...[or]...go elsewhere. The branch manager is the king of the bank,” he says.


Read the full post here.   Read more about the unusual 28 year career of Anders Bouvin, here.

   

Related tools & posts by Deb:

    

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
     
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Sometimes numbers can be a trap.   This is one of two posts featuring this unique, profitable bank that has outperformed MANY competitors.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 18, 2014 7:46 PM

This is a companion article, featuring the graphic shared by Niels Pflaeging on LinkedIn who mentions that  ...."companies like Handelsbanken have ....value creation and informal structures [that] are far more well-curated and developed than in command-and-control organizations."

~  Deb 

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The New HR Organization is a Talent Machine 2014

The New HR Organization is a Talent Machine  2014 | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"HR 2014 Future Trend findings by Bersin of Deloitte Analyst based on interviews with organizations on the Future of HR."


Excerpted:


1. Talent Management Defines HR


Microsoft's recently announced they've done away with forced ranking. ...HR's role was to spearhead this change - beyond the basics (payroll, employee relations, time and attendance, compliance.)  The basics are NOT enough to be competitive.


2. Integrated Talent Management Has Shifted to Optimized Talent Management.   ... "Optimization" = how can they better compete to attract, retain, and engage their aging workforce?


3. HR Business Partner Roles Have to Change Dramatically

This item features a special performance consulting group...of five senior HR specialists (staffing, OD, learning, labor relations) working on special talent projects. They diagnosed a problem in one unit as a lack of employment brand in one of the areas they serve. They worked with the recruiting team to build a local, highly tuned employment branding program - with internships, local universities and new sourcing tools - to gain access to engineers. Within a few quarters the problem started to go away.


Could a generalist have done this without a lot of help? Unlikely.


4.  Business Thinking and Data Are Now Critical to Success

...build talent analytics and workforce planning capabilities so [HR] can prove that we're delivering impact.

Photo: gilmorec Flickr cc


Related posts by Deb:

Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It

     

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'd define the 2014 term as Talent Development.  Traditional management techniques are changing too.  Many of the bigger companies, including Microsoft as cited in this article, have been slow to change.  Mid-size  and more agile large companies have long ago dropped forced rankings, for example.


Mid-size and larger companies are also building in Business Intelligence, data access that is accessible by more than the traditional management / leadership elite.  This is also changing the nature of business.

Bersin's views capture approaches already in place in leading companies, the exact point of this curation stream.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:08 PM

I'd define the 2014 term as Talent Development.  Traditional management techniques are changing too.  Many of the bigger companies, including Microsoft as cited in this article, have been slow to change.  Mid-size  and more agile, adaptable large companies have dropped forced rankings long ago.


Mid-size and larger companies are also building in Business Intelligence, data access that is accessible by more than the traditional management / leadership elite.  This is also changing the nature of business.

Bersin's views capture approaches already in place in leading companies, the exact point of this curation stream.


From Talent and Performance Development 

http://www.scoop.it/t/talent-and-performance-development 

news.   ~  D

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The Performance Preview, an Alternative to Performance Review

The Performance Preview, an Alternative to Performance Review | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Management consultant and UCLA professor Samuel Culbert offers a solid alternatives to problematic performance review practices in his 2008 book “Get Rid of the Performance Review:” 


  • In chapters 7 and 8, I offer the alternative—the performance preview. It’s as simple and elegant as it is successful. It does all the things performance reviews are supposed to do but don’t. 
      
  • In the end you will see what many of you already know in your heart: that mainstream management is embedded in, and relies on, a culture of domination—and that the performance review is the biggest hammer management has. 
      
  • You will see how the review destroys our spirit, as well as our corporate performance. You will see how the same people who created this sorry mess have the power to undo it. And you will see that there is a way to fix it, if only we have the courage.
     

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

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  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

"If only we have the courage," is a key observation by Culbert.

Risk-aversion, low courage, and avoidance is a malaise that can affect segements of, or even entire corporate cultures.  

Key points of Dr. Culbert's frank writings include:  

  • separating compensation from performance reviews, 
  • taking a look at the role of hierarchy to include that of a boss asking  “how can I help you achieve your best?” 
  • ending low value pratices like ranking and ratings.

     ~  Deb
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Performance Management Reinvented: Five Factors for Success

White Paper:  Performance Management: Five Factors for Success By Russ Silva, EVP Enterprise Solutions, LSA Global.


Related posts by Deb:
     

Curing ONE of the Seven Deadly Diseases of Management, Performance Appraisals

       


A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture

       


Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Pros:  Correctly identifies the wide-spread corporate cultural problems of boss-ism.  


Cons:  Has a Taylor-esque (Industrial Age) management and staff flavor of thinkers and doers.    


Silva covers a lot of ground in a few pages and gets to the nuggets of talent and performance development problems in performance management.  ~  Deb

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Photo-Blog: What's Happening with HR in Michigan

Photo-Blog:  What's Happening with HR in Michigan | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

This is a link to what's been happening in Michigan with HR events and learning in 2013.   A number of the photos, especially those with the tag MISHRM  (on Flickr photo sharing) are connected to blog posts by topic.




Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a bit of an experiment - an HR photo blog.  Let me know via DebNystrom@Reveln.com if you found it helpful, or via the comments below.  ~  Deb

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Problems with Certification vs. Skills, Alternatives to be Anti-Fragile

Problems with Certification vs. Skills, Alternatives to be Anti-Fragile | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"The typical certification program is expensive and outdated."  Would you agree?

      

Tests are expensive to write and administer so they usually are expensive to take. Traditional certifications are not always available in all parts of the world shutting out people who may benefit from them the most.

    

[With Info-Technology - Drupal as an example] ...tests ....frequently cover software that is no longer particularly relevant. And, they are really a test of whether the person studied to pass the test instead of ....how well the person can apply those skills in the real world.

"A strong portfolio and contributions history tell far more than any certification ever could."

If you are hiring for the short term (a consultant or freelancer or a project on a short deadline) then Drupal skill might be a more important factor.

If you are hiring for the long term [performance investment] then other factors weigh more heavily and those are the kinds of factors which can't be measured by most certifications.
 

....certifications can be useful to the hiring decision as part of a complete evaluation.


Related post by Deb:     

Beyond Resilience: Black Swans, Anti-Fragility and Change
Photo by Northern Ireland Executive, Flickr cc
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Certification is also an element of fragility in organization system connected to this Drupal certification example and the alternative offered by "Certified to Rock."  It's useful to consider for anti-fragile options.  ~  Deb


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How to Evaluate Performance of Project Teams

How to Evaluate Performance of Project Teams | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

An HR manager offers suggestions on  evaluating project team performance including a template you can download for your use.


[Teams] want know what is working and what isn't. Team evaluations don't necessarily have to be negative. If weak areas exist, remarks made can turn those negatives into positives.


Your team's project performance should be evaluated in one of two ways:

  • Team members should evaluate themselves and each other.

  • Team members should evaluate each other and team leaders should evaluate individual team members.  [DN:  The team leader is also a part of the team evaluation.]


Photo by Ekaterina Sotova Flickr-cc


Related posts from Deb:

    

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

    

Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The downloadable form is behavioral and a good start for looking at moving away from individual performance appraisal.  What would improve it even more is simply providing data to teams members on key metrics that are central to improving results.

We still have aways to go.  ~  D

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Thinking the Unthinkable ~ Metrics does not equal Achievement

Thinking the Unthinkable ~ Metrics does not equal Achievement | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
We're at the place where things start to go crazy. The dramatic acceleration of technical change coupled with the data explosion puts us at a precipice. Everywhere I look, people are scratching their heads.


Excerpts:

HR and its processes are going to be automated in the immediate future. ...the more thoughtful parts of the business will come under the dome of digitization.


__________________

...data visualization tools .....are all averages...[which] hide as much as they disclose. For the state of the art to involve the recounting of averages is a sad commentary on how far behind our profession has fallen.

__________________

The first wave will be data visualization tools that expose the massive inefficiencies in our processes.


Take the “cost to hire” or “time to hire” statistics. To date, they’ve been presented as averages that can be disected to see departmental averages and even job specific averages.


The problem is that they are all averages. Anyone who has been following our growing statistical literacy understands that averages hide as much as they disclose. For the state of the art to involve the recounting of averages is a sad commentary on how far behind our profession has fallen.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Metrics and industrial age measurement madness.   As W. Edwards Deming said, "“But he that would run his company on visible figures alone will in time have neither company nor figures”
“Out of the Crisis” 1982 – page 121.  

What will be important is getting good decision data, great metrics, the few, the best, the proud, to those who can best use it.  ~  Deb

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A History of Performance Appraisals, Letting Go - REVELN

"...provides a context for performance appraisals, ratings and reviews as very old ideas compared to organizational leadership pioneers and what's next.  Can we change our behaviorist-rooted habits?"


Performance management, defined in the 1970s, is rooted in scientific management. It is possible to acknowledge history, realize its impact on our business systems, and let go to embrace new strategies.


See the full blog post here:

    

A History of Performance Appraisals: Letting Go to Power New Culture


Related posts also by Deb:

   

     

      

 



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This presentation is additional context for my MISHRM 2013 presentation on "From Chaos to Creative: Performance Development in a VUCA World" in Grand Rapids, Michigan, October 8th, 2013 | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM   ~  Deb

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Factors which make a performance management system successful? PMS indeed.

Factors which make a performance management system successful? PMS indeed. | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it
A successful PMS (performance management system) drives the QMS (quality management system) which in turn ensures that the best quality service is delivered to every customer every time.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes, that's my title for this ScoopIt, not the author's.  PMS, post menstrual syndrome of the industrial age, indeed.

Sorry, I'm not seeing it here.  This is a cautionary tale post about 90's era PMS (individually based, behavior & competency-based, yada yada) performance management systems - which describe all the pieces and parts, but not the Return On Investment, ROI.  


There are shades of B.F. Skinner reinforcement of dog training in sight (getting people to respond to rewards.)  For more on this, take a look at Alfie Kohn for some shock therapy via "Punished by Rewards" and then the classic, well researched work of Frederick Herzberg on Achievement.

I continue to search for solid evidence that all this structuring focused on top down, directive management (mgr. conducts appraisals) provides great results.  I am not finding it.  


Great, high performing managers seem to be the game changer for PMS (the perf. management system) working.  No surprises there.


Dressing up top down scientific management (F. W. Taylor, industrial age era) as knowledge worker era systemic systems, is a lot of work for limited results, depending, of course, on the manager.  


~  Deb

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3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

Leadership today has evolved greatly.  Our systems for supporting high performance and leadership in teams and in entire organizations has not kept up with the times."


See the article, SlideShare and videos here.

Excerpts:

At a recent workshop with JVS in Southfield Michigan, I shared some of the research and practical organization experience I’ve collected on high performance teams.
 


As we hear of findings and new development from “big data” AND “small data” (highly personalized, tracked), it is also good to explore how access to performance data can inform leadership at all levels and encourage team achievement and speed, especially when old practices that slow and interfere with performance are removed.


Also keep in mind the differences between true teams vs. psuedo-teams  and groups.  Many project and task groups are assembled as teams to accomplish a charge or purpose.    Sometimes these groups or teams: 

  • produce an innovation or breakthrough success for their organizations,
  • are formed based on a favorite interest or pet project idea of an executive that, in hindsight, provides limited value to their organization.    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Besides research, this article includes my  interview findings of what stops performance dead in its tracks, including fresh insights from an interview of a millennial, a 25 year old, describing her work experience after graduating from college in 2010.    ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:39 PM

This is one of my own posts featuring research on emotional space in high performance teams as well as the positivity / negativity ratios in such teams.   What do you think?  ~  Deb

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6 Game Findings: High Performance Teams > Leadership & Decision Making

6 Game Findings: High Performance Teams > Leadership & Decision Making | Talent and Performance Development | Scoop.it

"6 critical differences between top performers and the rest in the areas of leadership and decision-making."


Finding 1: Top Performers avoided the "Presumption of change" trap.

Evidence for Finding 1: Even though the game starts with each team inheriting a business from the previous executive team 95% of the participants showed no curiosity regarding how successful the previous leadership team had been and why!


...almost all new leaders focus on what they need to change but not what they need to preserve.


What to change is only part of the challenge and for whatever reason (ego, identity, peer pressure ...) showing a lack of respect for the previous team's achievements seems to be a good predictor of sub-optimal performance.


Finding 2: Top Performers suspended assumptions, thoroughly reviewed all available instructions/background research and actively sought out any available expert input.
 

Evidence for Finding 2: Senior teams or functional experts generally did worse in the game than expected and junior teams/non-functional experts generally did better than expected.


As people become more experienced and competent they often become more fixed on their "Golden Rules" ("this always works" or "never do this"). [These] can also close people down to a fresh examination of the facts available to them.

In many cases the evidence which was available would have directly challenged these golden rules if it had been properly and objectively evaluated.


Read the full post  for more.


Related posts by Deb:

      


   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is an insightful list of provocative high performance team insights, different than the usual laundry list of "strong leadership," "stable teams," and, of course, a certain measure of "trust."  ~  D

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Djebar Hammouche's curator insight, September 4, 2013 12:06 PM
6 Findings: High performance team Leadership and Decision Making