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The Arts and the Creation of Mind - Eisner, Elliot W. - Yale University Press

The Arts and the Creation of Mind - Eisner, Elliot W. - Yale University Press | Taktueftir | Scoop.it
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2 Hands-On Games To Build Thinking Skills In Students

2 Hands-On Games To Build Thinking Skills In Students | Taktueftir | Scoop.it
2 Hands-On Games To Build Thinking Skills In Students
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New form of brain plasticity: Study shows how social isolation disrupts myelin production

New form of brain plasticity: Study shows how social isolation disrupts myelin production | Taktueftir | Scoop.it

Animals that are socially isolated for prolonged periods make less myelin in the region of the brain responsible for complex emotional and cognitive behavior, researchers at the University at Buffalo and Mt.


Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Tom Perran
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Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask?

Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask? | Taktueftir | Scoop.it

The first role of trained infotention is to recognize whether or not  multitasking, single-minded focus,  or alert but diffused attention is the most appropriate mind-tool for the task at hand. However, for those many situations in which multitasking is either necessary or preferable or both, the most important question is whether -- and to what degree -- multitasking more effectively is a learnable skill. -- Howard 

 

"Results showed that participants did much better at multitasking after training. Interestingly the benefits transferred to the untrained dual task. Brain training can thus be used to get better at multitasking!"


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Jenna Becerra's curator insight, February 20, 2013 1:52 AM

Before one can think about multitasking, it is important to take into account that it is more than just practice. One has to be metacognitive in his or her approach to learning and paying attention to what is important. Know individual tendencies, but also know that a mind can be trained. Multitasking is not always the right approach, but it is often inevitable. Training one's mind to multitask effectively will only result in efficiency.

Anne Macdonell's curator insight, May 14, 2013 8:28 AM

Can't the brain be trained in every task? Why not multitasking as well?

Audrey's comment, May 16, 2013 6:37 AM
Yes. Agree.
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The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect | Taktueftir | Scoop.it
The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

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Audrey's comment, September 9, 2013 6:01 AM
Yes.... Start young. This means pre-school education.
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What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't

What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't | Taktueftir | Scoop.it

The sort of short, simple explanations of complex brain functions that often make for good headlines rarely turn out to be true.


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Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, December 4, 2012 1:52 PM
Super article. Thank you so much for posting.
Emre Erdogan's curator insight, March 12, 2013 2:15 AM

Our brain is Mach more çöpler than we know

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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | Taktueftir | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES, Tom Perran
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WEAC's curator insight, August 7, 2015 9:55 AM

"Because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops."

Larry Heuser's curator insight, August 8, 2015 3:27 PM

Using the Internet is like jet skiing.  Skimming along the surface of the water at high speed, exposed to a broad vista, surrounded by many distractions, and only able to focus fleetingly on any one thing.

Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 2015 5:56 PM

This is true.  They seem to be absorbing ideas faster.

 

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A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic]

A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic] | Taktueftir | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES, Tom Perran
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Audrey's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:57 PM

I believe this is absolutely amazing!  This must be really great for those people whose preferred way to learn is through sound. Music is a very helpfu way to encourage learning. I have watched young children become captivated when they hear certain types of music.  At the Royal Festival Hall in London there are concerts with classical music specifically aimed at pre-school youngsters and above.  The growth in their neurons must be incredible!!!  Written by Audrey Foster for curated content at www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 8, 2013 1:03 PM

I found students enjoyed finding out what music I listen to. It did not mean they liked it, but it gave them insight that other things don't always.