Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe)
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Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe)
This magazine is about how coaching in involved in basically all aspects of sports and how hard it is to be a coach and the decisions they have to make.
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Just what’s wrong with doping? - The Boston Globe

Just what’s wrong with doping? - The Boston Globe | Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe) | Scoop.it
Sure, everyone agrees that drugs in sports are a problem. But when it comes to why, things break down.
Aaron Rowe's insight:
To dope or not to dope?
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NBA suspends Hornets’ Taylor for 24 games

NBA suspends Hornets’ Taylor for 24 games | Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe) | Scoop.it
http://hd-movie.us/nba-suspends-hornets-taylor-for-24-games/ Jeff Taylor has been suspended for 24 games. (USATSI) The NBA has suspended Jeff Taylor 24 games for domestic violence, the league announced on Wednesday. Back in October, the Charlotte Hornets forward pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor domestic violence charge stemming from an incident a month earlier. Commissioner Adam Silver issued the following lengthy statement on the matter: Domestic violence is a serious societal issue that is antithetical to any community or organization that prides itself on the values of respect for others, good moral character, and common decency. These values are central to the NBA, and domestic violence is an issue that is commanding our full attention. I have the responsibility to safeguard the best interests of the league and all of its constituents. ln addition to its profound impact on victims, domestic violence committed by any member of the NBA family causes damage to the league and undermines the public’s confidence in it. It is against this backdrop that I issue this opinion. ln the early morning of September 25,2014, Jeffery Taylor of the Charlotte Hornets was arrested in East Lansing, Michigan after an altercation at a local Marriott hotel with a woman with whom he was having a romantic relationship. Mr. Taylor was charged with one count of misdemeanor domestic violence assault, one count of misdemeanor assault on a hotel security officer, and one count of malicious destruction of hotel propefty. The NBA immediately commenced its own independent investigation into the incident. The NBA retained David Anders of Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen &Katz and Martha Stolley of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius to handle this matter. Both Mr. Anders and Ms. Stolley are former prosecutors, and Ms. Stolley has substantial prior experience handling domestic violence cases Over the course of several weeks, these investigators conducted numerous interviews (including separate interviews of Mr. Taylor and the woman involved in this matter) and reviewed various materials in order to determine the facts. During this period, by agreement of all parties, Mr. Taylor was on a paid leave of absence from the Hornets. Based on the NBA’s investigation, the following summary of facts is undisputed After a night of heavy drinking on September 24,2014, Mr. Taylor and the woman had an intense and high-volume argument that began in the hotel room where Mr. Taylor was staying, prompting hotel guests to call Marriott security. The argument escalated and resulted in Mr. Taylor shoving the woman in a violent manner into the hotel hallway so that she fell to the ground and struck her head on the opposite door, slapping her arm, and punching a hole in a wall near his hotel room. She had marks on her upper arm and a bump on her head but declined medical treatment. Shortly thereafter, when Mr. Taylor was arrested by East Lansing police officers, he was belligerent and uncooperative. On October 29,2014, Mr. Taylor pleaded guilty to misdemeanor domestic violence assault and malicious destruction of hotel property; the remaining assault charge with respect to the security officer was dismissed. Mr. Taylor was sentenced to 18 months of probation. As part of his probation, Mr. Taylor must complete 26 weeks in a domestic violence intervention program. Mr. Taylor also must enter an outpatient alcoholtreatment program and perform alcohol sensor tests daily for 60 days, after which he will be subject to random testing by the Probation Department. Finally, Mr. Taylor must perform 80 hours of community service. lf Mr. Taylor successfully meets these and other conditions of his probation, his domestic violence assault charge will be dismissed. ln the course of the NBA’s review of this matter, I received guidance from a group of domestic violence experts: Ted Bunch, Co-Founder of A Call To Men; Linda Fairstein, former Chief of the Sex Crimes Prosecution Unit of the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office; and Kalimah Johnson, Founder of SASHA Center, a Detroit-based healing and awareness center focusing on sexual assault. I also involved an internal group that focuses on education and counseling of players, including Kathy Behrens, the NBA’s Executive Vice President for Social Responsibility & Player Programs; Greg Taylor, the NBA’s Senior Vice President of Player Development; and Chrysa Chin, the NBA’s Vice President for Player Development; as well as Eric Hutcherson, the NBA’s Senior Vice President of Human Resources. Based on all the facts and circumstances of this matter, I hereby suspend Mr. Taylor without pay for a period of 24 regular season games. Because Mr. Taylor has been on paid leave from the Hornets since the starl of the regular season and has therefore already missed 1 1 games as of the date of this decision, he will be required to miss an additional 13 games, but will suffer a financial penalty equal to 24 games. This suspension is necessary to protect the interests of the NBA and the public’s confidence in it. Mr. Taylor’s conduct violates applicable law and, in my opinion, does not conform to standards of morality and is prejudicial and detrimental to the NBA. While the suspension is significantly longer than prior suspensions for incidents of domestic violence by NBA players, it is appropriate in light of Mr. Taylor’s conduct, the need to deter similar conduct going fonruard, and the evolving social consensus — with which we fully concur – that professional sports leagues like the NBA must respond to such incidents in a more rigorous way. Because education and training is just as important as the imposition of discipline, Mr. Taylor must also satisfactorily complete the terms of his sentence, including the domestic violence intervention program, alcohol counseling, and community service (which we recommend be directed toward efforts to help victims of domestic violence). ln addition, he will be required to attend individual counseling sessions with a counselor jointly selected by the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. lf Mr. Taylor fails to comply with any of these conditions, I reserve the right to revisit this matter. The NBA is committed to vigilance with respect to domestic violence. We will continue to work closely with the Players Association to provide education, awareness training, and appropriate resources to NBA players and their families. We recognize our responsibility to do all that we can to prevent this destructive and unacceptable conduct from happening in the future. This severity of punishment shows that Silver is taking the issue seriously. It is a strong statement from the league. Taylor suited up for 26 games last year in Charlotte before tearing his Achilles. He averaged 8.0 points, 2.3 rebounds and 0.8 assists per game. This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
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Market-driven morality

Market-driven morality | Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe) | Scoop.it

Eradicating corruption has become increasingly important to stakeholders in sport, from governing bodies and federations through to event-owners, clubs and teams. Organisations such as the International Olympic Committee have seriously sought to tackle financial corruption. The World Anti-Doping Agency and others have made great strides in confronting the use of drugs. Yet corruption remains, despite their actions. As a result, a new solution to the problem is emerging: market-driven morality.

Sponsors and other commercial partners, sometimes dissatisfied with the progress made by sports’ governors, are using their financial power and sporting influence to bring about faster change. Corrupt sport can have a serious impact on the companies and brands that are associated with it. There are growing concerns that a corrupt sport’s tarnished image could be transferred to a partner or sponsor—and that consumers might boycott a sponsor’s products.


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Ethical Issues in Sports Medicine


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Angel Eyes's curator insight, July 10, 2014 8:29 AM

It's interesting to see that ethics & morals do not just involve the sports side, but that it also plays an impact on the Sports Medicine side as well.

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4 Ethical Issues in Sports that Professionals Need to Know

4 Ethical Issues in Sports that Professionals Need to Know | Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe) | Scoop.it
Read this article from Shorter University for information about ethical issues in sport management and Shorter's online sports management degree!

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Good read!
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Lee Westwood proud of golf's ethics and moral values after Elliott Saltman is handed a three-month ban

Lee Westwood proud of golf's ethics and moral values after Elliott Saltman is handed a three-month ban | Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe) | Scoop.it
There is something comforting about truths delivered in the flat vowels of the
northern justice system.
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A gentleman's game?

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Some NFL Team Owners Want Ray Rice To Get A Second Chance


NFL training camps are well underway, but for the first time since 2007, Ray Rice hasn't been invited to one. Since being cut by the Baltimore Ravens in September 2014 for his brutal domestic violence incident against his wife, Janay, no NFL team has publicly expressed interest in signing the troubled former Pro Bowler.


That is, until this week, when two NFL owners went on record stating they hoped to see Ray Rice get a second chance in the league.


Before their preseason opener on Thursday night, Cleveland Browns owner Jim Haslem spoke to ESPN reporter Bob Holtzman on Rice, saying "I'd like to see him get another shot."



Browns owner Jimmy Haslem on Ray Rice "I'd like to see him get another shot". Tells me they want to see what team's young RBs can do first.

— bob holtzman (@BobHoltzmanESPN) August 13, 2015


Because football matters more than morality, the Browns, who are coincidentally in need of a running back who actually wants the starting job, have discussed signing Rice. Browns head coach Mike Pettine told Sports Illustrated on Tuesday that, "We've talked about it, but I don't think we're there at this point."


The team's running backs coach Wilbert Montgomery, who was Rice's position coach in Baltimore, has been openly critical of the running backs he has in camp, leading some outlets to presume that Montgomery is pushing for Rice's signing.


The Browns haven't been the only team with Rice on their mind this week. Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, the man who released Rice in September and whose organization reportedly told Janay to apologize for getting hit, was (of course) bullish on his future NFL opportunities.


"I think enough people are coming around a year later and saying he deserves a second chance," Bisciotti told Sirius XM NFL Radio. "We at the Ravens wholeheartedly agree ... I hope like hell he gets that opportunity."


For his part, Rice remains optimistic that an NFL team will reach out with an offer.


"I have to set my hope and faith and everything else that I'm doing in my life, I'm just really hopeful for a second chance," he told ESPN's Jemele Hill earlier this month.



But while some NFL coaches, owners, players and fans may be ready for Ray Rice to get another shot, domestic violence experts aren't.


“Sometimes it takes years for a batterer to change their behavior," Ruth M. Glenn, executive director of National Coalition Against Domestic Violence told The Huffington Post in July.


"And from what we witnessed in that particular incident, I’m just not convinced that what we have is a healthy person," she added.


Houston Texans owner Bob McNair is one NFL owner whose recent comments on Rice weren't a public endorsement of Rice's desire to return to the field. Texans star running back Arian Foster is sidelined for several weeks due to injury, which has opened the door for speculation about the Texans' interest in Rice.


McNair, however, swatted that talk down on Thursday, telling ESPN, "I think I'd want to talk with our players, and I don't know that that's something that they would like."


"We want people that fit in our locker room," he continued. "As I said, it's all about teamwork. And look, we've got four good running backs. I don't know that he's as good as any of the four we've got. I don't see anybody else trying to sign him, so I think that's a pretty good indication of where he stands."



Also on HuffPost:


-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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Good Youth Sports Coaches Teach, Model and Demand Sportsmanship, Fairness and Respectful Behavior

Good Youth Sports Coaches Teach, Model and Demand Sportsmanship, Fairness and Respectful Behavior | Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe) | Scoop.it
Good youth sports coaches teach, model, and demand respectful behavior, fairness and sportsmanship by athletes.

 

As a society we would not find it acceptable if teachers encouraged their students to cheat on tests. Youth sports should be no different. Existing programs to teach athletes moral ethics and to help coaches to teach moral ethics should be expanded and instituted in every community to teach decision-making, sportsmanship, competitive integrity, inspiring through leadership, justice and competitive responsibility.

Good coaches are alert to the possibility of bullying and proactively seek ways to reduce it. Similarly, a good coach teaches and models respect for the opposing team and game officials.

 

Coaches should be able to accept bad calls by umpires, refs and other sports officials (remember, most of them are volunteers, too)and mistakes by players without a public display of emotion or of dissatisfaction 


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MaryGrace Balaban's curator insight, January 14, 2014 9:07 PM

This makes me grateful for the outstanding coaches I have known. To all coaches, from up-and-coming aspirants to seasoned veterans, may this serve as a guideline for how you lead your youngsters. 

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Lance Armstrong: Case of a Moral Dilemma | The Sports Doc Chalk Talk

Lance Armstrong: Case of a Moral Dilemma | The Sports Doc Chalk Talk | Morals and Ethics in Sport: How hard is it to coach? (Aaron Rowe) | Scoop.it
Does Lance Armstrong's great efforts in cancer awareness offset his decade worth of cheating? This is not only a moral dilemma for Lance, but also his fans.

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Questionable?
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Angel Eyes's curator insight, July 10, 2014 9:00 AM

Should the good deeds be over shadowed by the bad?