Systems Theory
Follow
Find
4.2K views | +11 today
Systems Theory
theoretical aspects of (social) systems theory
Curated by Ben van Lier
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

Google DeepMind acquisition researchers working on a Neural Turing Machine

Google DeepMind acquisition researchers working on a Neural Turing Machine | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Officials with Google have revealed that researchers working on a start-up recently purchased by the tech giant are working on building what they call a Neural Turing Machine—an artificial intelligence based computer system that seeks to fulfill the idea of a Turing Machine. Teams with the project ...

Via Spaceweaver
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

The Three Breakthroughs That Have Finally Unleashed AI on the World | WIRED

The Three Breakthroughs That Have Finally Unleashed AI on the World | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The AI on the horizon looks more like Amazon Web Services—cheap, reliable, industrial-grade digital smartness running behind everything, and almost invisible except when it blinks off. This is a big deal, and now it's here.

Via Spaceweaver
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

You’re powered by quantum mechanics. No, really…

You’re powered by quantum mechanics. No, really… | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Biologists have long been wary of applying quantum theory to their own field. But, as Jim Al-Khalili and Johnjoe McFadden reveal, it might explain much natural phenomena
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

Tech: Ignoring an increasingly complex world is not an option - Financial Director

Tech: Ignoring an increasingly complex world is not an option - Financial Director | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Making things simple has been a hallmark of our past, but it won’t do for the future

Via Spaceweaver
more...
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

This Sociological Theory Explains Why Wall Street Is Rigged for Crisis

This Sociological Theory Explains Why Wall Street Is Rigged for Crisis | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
In giant, complex systems like global financial markets, terrible accidents are inevitable. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Complex Systems in Social Theory

Complex Systems in Social Theory | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Systems are theory. They are distinguished by observers, scientific or intellectual; and talked about with other observers. They describe a complexity, consisting of a highly integrated differentia...
Ben van Lier's insight:

Article by Dirk Baecker

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

UK must learn military drone laws and ethics, says report (Wired UK)

UK must learn military drone laws and ethics, says report (Wired UK) | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A report into the use of drones in the UK has concluded that the technology can deliver "significant benefits" to the country's national security policy and economy over the next few decades
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

More research needed to address synthetic biology security concerns

More research needed to address synthetic biology security concerns | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A new paper examines security risks and policy questions related to the growing field of synthetic biology. While the author doesn't think the field is ripe for exploitation by terrorists, it does highlight significant gaps in our understanding of the nuts and bolts of lab work in synthetic biology ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Powerful quantum computers move a step closer to reality

Powerful quantum computers move a step closer to reality | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A research team from Australia has pushed quantum computers closer to fruition, but a former NSA director warns that the technology could break encryption. By Alex Hern
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Dr. Derek Cabrera’s Plenary for 58th Meeting of the International Society for the Systems Sciences at the School of Business at George Washington University, Washington DC | MetaMap - Cabrera Resea...

Dr. Derek Cabrera’s Plenary for 58th Meeting of the International Society for the Systems Sciences at the School of Business at George Washington University, Washington DC | MetaMap - Cabrera Resea... | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
+iT: Bridge theory and practice with #DSRP: distinguish, systematize, relate ideas from different perspectives
http://t.co/X8EQjNKK3F
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Vegetables: How Cyborg Plants Can Monitor Our World | WIRED

The Internet of Vegetables: How Cyborg Plants Can Monitor Our World | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
In the not too distant future, we could see a race of cyborg plants that tell us when they need more water, what chemicals they've been exposed to, and what parasites are eating at their roots. These half-organic, half-electronic creations may even tell us how much pollution is in the air. And yes, they'll plug into the network.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Discovery of new subatomic particle, type of meson, to 'transform' understanding of fundamental force of nature

Discovery of new subatomic particle, type of meson, to 'transform' understanding of fundamental force of nature | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The discovery of a new particle will "transform our understanding" of the fundamental force of nature that binds the nuclei of atoms, researchers argue. The discovery of the new particle will help provide greater understanding of the strong interaction, the fundamental force of nature found within the protons of an atom's nucleus.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Safety Worries May Slow Integration of Robots into Human Workforce | MIT Technology Review

Safety Worries May Slow Integration of Robots into Human Workforce | MIT Technology Review | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Standards bodies are wrestling with the impact of accidental robot strikes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

John J. Reilly Center // John J. Reilly Center // University of Notre Dame

John J. Reilly Center // John J. Reilly Center // University of Notre Dame | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The Reilly Center at the University of Notre Dame explores conceptual, ethical, and policy issues where science and technology intersect with society from different disciplinary perspectives. Our purpose is to promote the advancement of science and technology for the common good. We accomplish this through education, research, and outreach in a Catholic context.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

See me here, see me there: A quantum world arising from many ordinary ones

See me here, see me there: A quantum world arising from many ordinary ones | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

The bizarre behavior of the quantum world — with objects existing in two places simultaneously and light behaving as either waves or particles — could result from interactions between many 'parallel' everyday worlds, a new theory suggests.


“It is a fundamental shift from previous quantum interpretations,” says Howard Wiseman, a theoretical quantum physicist at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, who together with his colleagues describes the idea in Physical Review X1.


Theorists have tried to explain quantum behavior through various mathematical frameworks. One of the older interpretations envisages the classical world as stemming from the existence of many simultaneous quantum ones. But that ‘many worlds’ approach, pioneered by the US theorist Hugh Everett III in the 1950s, relies on the worlds branching out independently from one another, and not interacting at all (see 'Many worlds: See me here, see me there').


By contrast, Wiseman’s team envisages many worlds bumping into one another, calling it the 'many interacting worlds' approach. On its own, each world is ruled by classical Newtonian physics. But together, the interacting motion of these worlds gives rise to phenomena that physicists typically ascribe to the quantum world.


The authors work through the mathematics of how that interaction could produce quantum phenomena. For instance, one well-known example of quantum behaviour is when particles are able to tunnel through an energetic barrier that in a classical world they would not be able to overcome on their own. Wiseman says that, in his scenario, as two classical worlds approach an energetic barrier from either side, one of them will increase in speed while the other will bounce back. The leading world will thus pop through the seemingly insurmountable barrier, just as particles do in quantum tunneling.


But much work remains. “By no means have we answered all the questions that such a shift entails,” says Wiseman. Among other things, he and his collaborators have yet to overcome challenges such as explaining how their many-interacting-worlds theory could explain quantum entanglement, a phenomenon in which particles separated by a distance are still linked in terms of their properties.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Carlos Garcia Pando's comment, October 31, 2014 5:25 AM
I think entanglement is a consequence of two simple universes perfectly matching in one particle. What we see is not two entangled particles but one particle that belongs to two very close universes. Close in a different sense, not spatial proximity as we know it, but close enough to share at least one particle in all its observable attributes but space position.
Kirsty Foster's curator insight, October 31, 2014 9:24 AM

kirsty

Vloasis's curator insight, October 31, 2014 2:56 PM

Much to ponder.

Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

‘FRENCH’ CYBERNETICS

RT @striphas: Recommended - RT@andrewiliadis: ‘FRENCH’ CYBERNETICS by Christopher Johnson http://t.co/iGCOWdB314
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

Will Your Next Best Friend Be A Robot?

Will Your Next Best Friend Be A Robot? | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Robots can already vacuum your house and drive your car. Soon, they will be your companions.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

The real cyborgs - in-depth feature about people merging with machines

The real cyborgs - in-depth feature about people merging with machines | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The real cyborgs - in-depth feature about people merging with machines. http://t.co/PLvVo1qYX5

#Robotics #Cybernetics #Transhumanism
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Closing In On Quantum Computing | WIRED

Closing In On Quantum Computing | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
“For more than two decades,” writes Valerie C. Coffey (@StellarEdit), “one of the holy grails of physics has been to build a quantum computer that can process certain types of large-scale, very difficult problems exponentially faster than classical computers. Physicists are making progress toward this goal every day, but nearly every part of a quantum…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Quantum computer buyers' guide: Apps - tech - 20 October 2014 - New Scientist

Quantum computer buyers' guide: Apps - tech - 20 October 2014 - New Scientist | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
What will you be able to run on your quantum computer? Here's our pick of the best apps in the pipeline
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

'Cyber' is everywhere, but what does the prefix mean and where did it come from? - 10News

'Cyber' is everywhere, but what does the prefix mean and where did it come from? - 10News | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
“Cyber” — it’s more of a prefix than a word — hasn’t always been so ominous. In fact, it was quite the opposite back in the 90s when the prefix was sometimes linked up with sex to form “cybersex.”  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Weekend Read: The Imminent Decentralized Computing Revolution

Weekend Read: The Imminent Decentralized Computing Revolution | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Gary Sharma, founder of GarysGuide: A mega-trend is brewing that could make bureaucratic hierarchies, middlemen and gatekeepers everywhere obsolete including social networks, banks, stock exchanges, electronic voting systems and even governments. It’s called decentralized computing, and it could fundamentally transform the way we connect to and exchange value on the Internet. There are three technologies that will form the foundation of the decentralized computing stack -- mesh networks (decentralized networking), block chain (decentralized transactions) and autonomous agents (decentralized decision making). ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Microsoft’s Strange Quest for the Topological Qubit | MIT Technology Review

Microsoft’s Strange Quest for the Topological Qubit | MIT Technology Review | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Can an aging corporation’s adventures in fundamental physics research open a new era of unimaginably powerful computers?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Gartner Predicts Top 2015 And Beyond Trends For Technology, IT Organizations, And Consumers

Gartner Predicts Top 2015 And Beyond Trends For Technology, IT Organizations, And Consumers | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
On the occasion of its sold-out Symposium/ITxpo this week, Gartner revealed its predictions for top technology trends, the impact of technology on businesses and consumers, and the continuing evolution of the IT organization and the role of the CIO.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

Could Quantum Computing Lead To Creative Robots?

Could Quantum Computing Lead To Creative Robots? | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Quantum computing will allow for the creation of powerful computers, but also much smarter and more creative robots than conventional ones. This was the conclusion arrived at by researchers, who have confirmed that quantum tools help robots learn and respond much faster to the stimuli around them.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.