Systems Theory
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AI Algorithm Identifies Humorous Pictures | MIT Technology Review

AI Algorithm Identifies Humorous Pictures | MIT Technology Review | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The latest work with AI machines is expanding the new field of computational humor.
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Systems Theory
theoretical aspects of (social) systems theory
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Inside the Epic Go Tournament Where Google’s AI Came to Life

Inside the Epic Go Tournament Where Google’s AI Came to Life | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The battle between Google's AlphaGo AI and Go champion Lee Sedol was more than just a game. It was proof that AI can think like us---and make us better.
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China chases early lead in world’s next industrial age with smart manufacturing

China chases early lead in world’s next industrial age with smart manufacturing | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
AT a plant in suburban Shanghai, machines press metal sheets into the shape of car body panels, hoods and doors. Auto parts carried by conveyor belts arrive soundlessly under giant robotic arms which
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Should the NHS share patient data with Google's DeepMind? (Wired UK)

Should the NHS share patient data with Google's DeepMind? (Wired UK) | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
It's fundamental to healthcare that the person receiving treatment agrees to receive it. But is that the case with DeepMind's access to NHS patient data?
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Practopoiesis: How cybernetics of biology can help AI

Practopoiesis: How cybernetics of biology can help AI | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Practopoiesis - a new theory on biological intelligence that can help us develop artificia
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Fanuc sets sights on army of interconnected robots - FT.com

Fanuc sets sights on army of interconnected robots - FT.com | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
With more than 400,000 of its yellow robots already reigning on the world’s factory floors, Fanuc has a new goal for the digital era: connecting the brains of industrial robots. In a rare recent tour by the Financial Times of Fanuc’s annual robotics
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How the Blockchain Can Avoid the Perils of Futurism - CoinDesk

How the Blockchain Can Avoid the Perils of Futurism - CoinDesk | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Is the blockchain community too focused on futurism? In this opinion piece one developer argues the answer is yes.
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Microsoft’s Nadella taps potential of industrial internet of things - FT.com

Microsoft’s Nadella taps potential of industrial internet of things - FT.com | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
When takes to the stage in Germany on Sunday for his first appearance at Hannover Messe, one of the main events in the manufacturing industry’s annual calendar, it will signal a significant change for Microsoft. The chief executive of the technology
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Your Simple (Yes, Simple) Guide to Quantum Entanglement

Your Simple (Yes, Simple) Guide to Quantum Entanglement | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Quantum entanglement is thought to be one of the trickiest concepts in science, but the core issues are simple.
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China Is Building a Robot Army of Model Workers

China Is Building a Robot Army of Model Workers | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Can China reboot its manufacturing industry—and the global economy—by replacing millions of workers with machines?
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The first ever photograph of light as both a particle and wave

The first ever photograph of light as both a particle and wave | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

(Phys.org)—Light behaves both as a particle and as a wave. Since the days of Einstein, scientists have been trying to directly observe both of these aspects of light at the same time.

 

Quantum mechanics tells us that light can behave simultaneously as a particle or a wave. However, there has never been an experiment able to capture both natures of light at the same time; the closest we have come is seeing either wave or particle, but always at different times. Taking a radically different experimental approach, EPFL scientists have now been able to take the first ever snapshot of light behaving both as a wave and as a particle. The breakthrough work is published in Nature Communications.

 

When UV light hits a metal surface, it causes an emission of electrons. Albert Einstein explained this "photoelectric" effect by proposing that light – thought to only be a wave – is also a stream of particles. Even though a variety of experiments have successfully observed both the particle- and wave-like behaviors of light, they have never been able to observe both at the same time.

 

A research team led by Fabrizio Carbone at EPFL has now carried out an experiment with a clever twist: using electrons to image light. The researchers have captured, for the first time ever, a single snapshot of light behaving simultaneously as both a wave and a stream of particles.

 

The experiment is set up like this: A pulse of laser light is fired at a tiny metallic nanowire. The laser adds energy to the charged particles in the nanowire, causing them to vibrate. Light travels along this tiny wire in two possible directions, like cars on a highway. When waves traveling in opposite directions meet each other they form a new wave that looks like it is standing in place. Here, this standing wave becomes the source of light for the experiment, radiating around the nanowire.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works.

China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works. | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
China is confidently promoting its vision of “Internet Sovereignty.”
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Has the age of quantum computing arrived?

Has the age of quantum computing arrived? | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
It’s a mind-bending concept with the potential to change the world, and Canadian tech company D-Wave claims to have cracked the code
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'Virtual partner' elicits emotional responses from a human partner in real-time

'Virtual partner' elicits emotional responses from a human partner in real-time | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

Can machines think? That's what renowned mathematician Alan Turing sought to understand back in the 1950s when he created an imitation game to find out if a human interrogator could tell a human from a machine based solely on conversation deprived of physical cues. The Turing test was introduced to determine a machine's ability to show intelligent behavior that is equivalent to or even indistinguishable from that of a human. Turing mainly cared about whether machines could match up to humans' intellectual capacities.

 

But there is more to being human than intellectual prowess, so researchers from the Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences (CCSBS) in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science at Florida Atlantic University set out to answer the question: "How does it 'feel' to interact behaviorally with a machine?"

 

They created the equivalent of an "emotional" Turing test, and developed a virtual partner that is able to elicit emotional responses from its human partner while the pair engages in behavioral coordination in real-time.

 

Results of the study, titled "Enhanced Emotional Responses during Social Coordination with a Virtual Partner," are recently published in the International Journal of Psychophysiology. The researchers designed the virtual partner so that its behavior is governed by mathematical models of human-to-human interactions in a way that enables humans to interact with the mathematical description of their social selves.

 

"Our study shows that humans exhibited greater emotional arousal when they thought the virtual partner was a human and not a machine, even though in all cases, it was a machine that they were interacting with," said Mengsen Zhang, lead author and a Ph.D. student in FAU's CCSBS. "Maybe we can think of intelligence in terms of coordinated motion within and between brains."

 

The virtual partner is a key part of a paradigm developed at FAU called the Human Dynamic Clamp -- a state-of-the-art human machine interface technology that allows humans to interact with a computational model that behaves very much like humans themselves. In simple experiments, the model -- on receiving input from human movement -- drives an image of a moving hand which is displayed on a video screen. To complete the reciprocal coupling, the subject sees and coordinates with the moving image as if it were a real person observed through a video circuit. This social "surrogate" can be precisely tuned and controlled -- both by the experimenter and by the input from the human subject.

 

"The behaviors that gave rise to that distinctive emotional arousal were simple finger movements, not events like facial expressions for example, known to convey emotion," said Emmanuelle Tognoli, Ph.D., co-author and associate research professor in FAU's CCSBS. "So the findings are rather startling at first."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Humans VS robots - meet the world champion who lost to Google's two-year-old computer program

Humans VS robots - meet the world champion who lost to Google's two-year-old computer program | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, 100 million people watched a Google-owned computer beat a (human) champion at Go, the world’s most complicated board game. So how did the machine triumph, and what are the implications for the struggle between man and machine?
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Scientists Talk Privately About Creating a Synthetic Human Genome

Scientists Talk Privately About Creating a Synthetic Human Genome | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The project poses ethical issues about whether humans could be created without parents.
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Systems Science Ascending

Systems Science Ascending | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
After years of development in increasingly fracturing sub-disciplines it seems that systems science as an integrated whole domain of knowledge is rising again. For those familiar with the history of systems science you will recall that in the earl

Via Bernard Ryefield
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The next AI is no AI

The next AI is no AI | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Artificial Intelligence is starting to turn invisible from the outside in -- and vice versa. The exact effects and workings of AI technologies are becoming..
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Building AI Is Hard—So Facebook Is Building AI That Builds AI

Building AI Is Hard—So Facebook Is Building AI That Builds AI | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
By forcing computers to do more of the grunt work, the world's biggest tech companies are accelerating how quickly AI enters the everyday world.
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Scientists Create a 5-atom Quantum Computer That Could Make Today's Encryption Obsolete

Scientists Create a 5-atom Quantum Computer That Could Make Today's Encryption Obsolete | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
MIT scientists have developed a 5-atom quantum computer, one that is able to render traditional encryption obsolete.
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Claude Shannon’s information theory built the foundation for the digital era

Claude Shannon’s information theory built the foundation for the digital era | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Claude Shannon, born 100 years ago, devised the mathematical representation of information that made the digital era possible.
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