Systems Theory
Follow
Find
2.6K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Ben van Lier
onto Systems Theory
Scoop.it!

Europe launches largest civilian robotics research program, worth $3.8BN

Europe launches largest civilian robotics research program, worth $3.8BN | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The SPARC partnership between the European Commission and the private sector will create many jobs and help keep Europe competitive, the Commission claims.
more...
No comment yet.
Systems Theory
theoretical aspects of (social) systems theory
Curated by Ben van Lier
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Schumpeter and the Second Machine Age

Volg de Centric-blog over The Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, Het Nieuwe Werken, interoperabiliteit en Sustainable Architecture.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Systems Theory

Systems Theory | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
By Gordon Rugg Systems theory is about what happens when individual items are connected and become a system. “Items” in this context can be anything physical and/or abstract, which gives you a pret...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Cybernetics Tradition

Jillian Packer Dena Rosko Sherry Janda Joseph Kemp Gonzaga University 2008 (Cybernetics Tradition #claudeshannon #cybernetictradition http://t.co/6DYHDSpGAa via @SlideShare)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Do quantum computers threaten global encryption systems? - BBC News

Do quantum computers threaten global encryption systems? - BBC News | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
BBC News
Do quantum computers threaten global encryption systems?
BBC News
With that secure channel created, different encryption systems that are much less susceptible to attack by quantum computers are used to protect data shuttling back and forth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Why IBM’s New Brainlike Chip May Be “Historic” | MIT Technology Review

Why IBM’s New Brainlike Chip May Be “Historic” | MIT Technology Review | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A chip that uses a million digital neurons and 256 million synapses may signal the beginning of a new era of more intelligent computers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

How the Web Became Our ‘External Brain,’ and What It Means for Our Kids | Opinion | WIRED

How the Web Became Our ‘External Brain,’ and What It Means for Our Kids | Opinion | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Search YouTube for “baby” and “iPad” and you’ll find clips featuring one-year-olds attempting to manipulate magazine pages and television screens as though they were touch-sensitive displays. These children are one step away from assuming that such technology is a natural, spontaneous part of the material world.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Keep, Delete, Modify: Synthetic Genes, Synthetic Cells, Synthetic Life

Keep, Delete, Modify: Synthetic Genes, Synthetic Cells, Synthetic Life | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Nature needed about one billion years to create the simplest single-cell organisms that swam around in the primordial soup. Now, scientists are eager to create synthetic life – but better and faster.

 

Hamilton Smith (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1978 with Werner Arber and Daniel Nathans) started his lecture at the 64th Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau with a quote from Richard Feynman (Nobel Prize in Physics 1965): Feynman had probably meant physical models, whereas Smith referred to living organisms. In his laboratory at the J. Craig Venter Institute, he tries to create synthetic cells: “I hope that if we create that, we will understand.”


Nowadays, the entire human genome has been decoded. But how a live human being develops from DNA molecules, a human being that can breath, eat, walk, study, love, receive Nobel Prizes and award them – nobody really understands yet. Even for single-cell organisms, this isn’t crystal clear. Even the simplest bacteria exhibit genes without apparent function, that are not essential for life. During evolution, a lot of ‘genetic waste’ has accumulated that might have been useful at some point, but was rendered useless by mutations. Some genetic fragments were in fact smuggled into the genome by viruses, others were created by accidental duplications of genetic segments. Numerous molecular mechanisms lead to many genetic variations – rendering evolution possible in the first place. But over time, many of these genes and segments have become useless.


Currently Smith tries to tidy up the genome of Mycoplasma mycoides, a microbe normally living in the digestive tract of ruminants. Originally Smith and his team wanted to use the genome of Mycoplasma genitalium, the bacterium with the smallest known genome – it needs only 475 genes to live. Smith estimates that about 100 of these are non-essential. But since M. mycoides has a much higher cell division rate, although its genome is twice as large, experiments with M. mycoides proved to be more effective. During this ‘minimal cell project’, the researchers switch off one gene after another and study the effects on the microbes. (And the slower the microbes grow, the longer the researchers have to wait for their results.) Smith’s final goal is “a genome that is very understandable – we are searching for the genetic kernels of life”.


Smith also assumes that all genes from the last group can be switched off without negative impacts on the microbes. Concerning the middle category, the researchers have to carefully weigh all options. When all is done, the result should be a bacterium that can still multiply rapidly, at least in laboratory conditions that offer plenty of nourishment, constant temperatures, but no competitors. The researchers’ goal is a fifty percent genome reduction in a happily thriving microbe that divides at least once in 100 minutes.


Smith likes using computer terms to describe his work. He compares the genome of any organism with its software, the rest is hardware (the cytoplasm, proteins and enzymes), controlled by said software. As soon as a cell receives a new genetic program, it starts to put this program to use. In order to test their own synthetic programs, Smith and his team replaced the bacterium’s DNA with synthetic DNA containing their basic program. To date, the old ‘hardware’ has not adopted the new program ‘update’. In computer speak, troubleshooting and maintenance are called “debugging”: Smith and his team will be busy with debugging for some time.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

Philosophical Disquisitions: Bostrom on Superintelligence (1): The Orthogonality Thesis

Philosophical Disquisitions: Bostrom on Superintelligence (1): The Orthogonality Thesis | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

William Gibson: the man who saw tomorrow

William Gibson: the man who saw tomorrow | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
William Gibson's science-fiction novel, 30 years old this month, leapt into cyberspace almost before it existed, writes Ed Cumming

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
Ben van Lier's insight:

see also my weblog http://bit.ly/1clSE26

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

The Rapid Advance of Artificial Intelligence

The Rapid Advance of Artificial Intelligence | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Scientists and engineers are creating a world in which cars drive themselves, machines recognize people and humanoid robots travel unattended.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

Microsoft Challenges Google’s Artificial Brain With ‘Project Adam’ | Enterprise | WIRED

Microsoft Challenges Google’s Artificial Brain With ‘Project Adam’ | Enterprise | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Drawing on the work of a clever cadre of academic researchers, the biggest names in tech—including Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Apple—are embracing a more powerful form of AI known as “deep learning,” using it to improve everything from speech recognition and language translation to computer vision, the ability to identify images without human help.

Via Spaceweaver
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

Inside the Artificial Brain That’s Remaking the Google Empire | Enterprise | WIRED

Inside the Artificial Brain That’s Remaking the Google Empire | Enterprise | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
It was one of the most tedious jobs on the internet. A team of Googlers would spend day after day staring at computer screens, scrutinizing tiny snippets of street photographs, asking themselves the same question over and over again: “Am I looking at an address or not?’ Click. Yes. Click. Yes. Click. No. This was…

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

Collaborative learning for robots | KurzweilAI

Collaborative learning for robots | KurzweilAI | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

Researchers from MIT’s Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems have developed an algorithm in which distributed agents — such as robots exploring a building — collect data and analyze it independently. Pairs of agents, such as robots passing each other in the hall, then exchange analyses.

In experiments involving several different data sets, the researchers’ distributed algorithm actually outperformed a standard algorithm that works on data aggregated at a single location, as described in an arXiv paper.

 


Via Spaceweaver
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

AI Systems Will Prove Useful Long Before They Become Self-Aware - Wired

AI Systems Will Prove Useful Long Before They Become Self-Aware - Wired | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Wired
AI Systems Will Prove Useful Long Before They Become Self-Aware
Wired
winning Watson supercomputer. This could be built today in theory, but it will probably be a few years before anything like it is built in practice.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

A Thousand Kilobots Self-Assemble Into Complex Shapes - IEEE Spectrum

A Thousand Kilobots Self-Assemble Into Complex Shapes - IEEE Spectrum | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
This is probably the most robots that have ever been in the same place at the same time, ever ("@kedwardbear: #Robot swarms: 1000 #kilobots self-assemble into complex shapes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

The man behind Facebook's artificial brain attempt (Wired UK)

The man behind Facebook's artificial brain attempt (Wired UK) | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Deep learning has suddenly spread across the commercial tech world, from Google to Microsoft to Baidu to Twitter, just a few years after most AI researchers openly scoffed at it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Humans Are Heading Down A Path That Will Allow Us To Supercharge The Brain

Humans Are Heading Down A Path That Will Allow Us To Supercharge The Brain | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A small jolt of electrical stimulation can boost memory and focus. What'll be possible once we can implant chips into the brain?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

IBM Unveils a ‘Brain-Like’ Chip With 4,000 Processor Cores | Enterprise | WIRED

IBM Unveils a ‘Brain-Like’ Chip With 4,000 Processor Cores | Enterprise | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The human brain is the world’s most sophisticated computer, capable of learning new things on the fly, using very little data. It can recognize objects, understand speech, respond to change. Since the early days of digital technology, scientists have worked to build computers that were more like the three-pound organ inside your head. Most efforts…
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

Robotic suit gives shipyard workers super strength - health - 04 August 2014 - New Scientist

Robotic suit gives shipyard workers super strength - health - 04 August 2014 - New Scientist | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Workers building the world's biggest ships could soon don robotic exoskeletons to lug around 100-kilogram hunks of metal as if they're nothing

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

Bostrom on Superintelligence (2): The Instrumental Convergence Thesis

Bostrom on Superintelligence (2): The Instrumental Convergence Thesis | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
This is the second post in my series on Nick Bostrom’s recent book Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies. In the previous post, I looked at Bostrom’s defence of the orthogonality thesis. This thesis claimed that pretty much any level of intelligence — when “intelligence” is understood as skill at means-end reasoning — is compatible with pretty much any (final) goal. Thus, an artificial agent could have a very high level of intelligence, and nevertheless use that intelligence to pursue very odd final goals, including goals that are inimical to the survival of human beings. In other words, there is no guarantee that high levels of intelligence among AIs will lead to a better world for us.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

3 Things You Should Know The Network Economy

3 Things You Should Know The Network Economy | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
In recent years a robust science of networks has been established, so we’ve gained important insights into how they function. It’s time we start putting the science to work in how we manage enterprises.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

What is the Difference between Posthumanism and Transhumanism?

What is the Difference between Posthumanism and Transhumanism? | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
While at conferences and doing research and writing over the past couple of years, I’ve noticed a lot of confusion about the terms “posthuman,” “transhuman,” and “posthumanism.”  A lot of people—including scholars who should know better—use these terms pretty much interchangeably and indiscriminately.  Part of the problem is that these terms are all fairly new.  So for clarity’s sake, I offer these simple thumbnail definitions of all three terms…

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

When Robots Come for Our Jobs, Will We Be Ready to Outsmart Them? | Opinion | WIRED

When Robots Come for Our Jobs, Will We Be Ready to Outsmart Them? | Opinion | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
To survive in this new environment, we human beings must foster high-level cognitive or emotional skills, and find jobs that require them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Why the Internet of Things Narrative Has to Change

Why the Internet of Things Narrative Has to Change | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
It's time to approach the idea of the Internet of Things properly and start avoiding common misconceptions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Cybernetics as Conversation

Cybernetics as Conversation | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Jeff talks about second order cybernetics and Autopoesis as ways to think
about customer interactions.  (RT @hakmem: #DevOps is #Cybernetics, but Cyberneticists do not get it. There.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben van Lier
Scoop.it!

Quantum math makes human irrationality more sensible | Science News

Quantum math makes human irrationality more sensible | Science News | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Vagaries of human decision making make sense if quantum math describes the way the brain works.
more...
No comment yet.