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I, Quantum Robot - Scientific American (blog)

I, Quantum Robot - Scientific American (blog) | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Scientific American (blog)
I, Quantum Robot
Scientific American (blog)
Artificial Intelligence is the ability of a computer system to operate in a manner similar to human intelligence.

Via Alejandro J. Alvarez S., luiy
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Alejandro J. Alvarez S.'s curator insight, March 18, 2013 5:50 PM

Very interesting, I enjoyed reading it.

luiy's curator insight, March 19, 2013 6:13 AM

The quantum robot is the idea of combining quantum theory with robot technology. In other words, it is a practical use of the combination of quantum computing and robot technology. Quantum computing involves using quantum systems and quantum states to do computations.

 

A robot is an automated machine that is capable of doing a set of complex tasks. In some applications of robots, the programming used to run the robots may be based on artificial intelligence. Artificial Intelligence is the ability of a computer system to operate in a manner similar to human intelligence. Think of artificial intelligence as if you were training a machine to act like a human. Essentially, quantum robots are complex quantum systems.They are mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with their environments. Several programs would be involved in the operation of the robot. These programs would be quantum searching algorithms and quantum reinforcement learning algorithms.

 

Quantum reinforcement learning is based on superposition of the quantum state and quantum parallelism. A quantum state is a system that is a set of quantum numbers. The four basic quantum numbers represent the energy level, angular momentum, spin, and magnetization. In the superposition of quantum states, the idea is to get one state to look like another.

 

Let’s say I have two dogs. One dog knows how to fetch a bone (energy level), sit up (angular momentum), give a high five (spin), and shake hands (magnetization). Now, let’s apply the superposition of quantum states. Since one dog has been trained and given the commands, the other dog must learn to mimic or copy what the first dog did. Each time a command is achieved, reinforcement is given. The reinforcement for the dog would be a bone (or no bone if the command is not achieved).

 

In quantum reinforcement learning, it is slightly different. The idea would be similar to an “If-Then” statement. An example would be if the quantum state has a certain energy level, then the angular momentum is certain value. This idea of “If-Then” statements in the quantum world leads to an idea which can be a topic of its own; Quantum Logic.

Systems Theory
theoretical aspects of (social) systems theory
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Cyber-physical systems, complexity and emergence

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 New weblog published. The subject of the weblog is this time: Cyber-Physical Systems, Complexity and Emergence

 

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Fear artificial stupidity, not artificial intelligence - New Scientist

Fear artificial stupidity, not artificial intelligence - New Scientist | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Stephen Hawking thinks computers may surpass human intelligence and take over the world. We won't ever be silicon slaves, insists an AI expert
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The Dark Corners of Our DNA Hold Clues about Disease

The Dark Corners of Our DNA Hold Clues about Disease | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A “deep-learning” algorithm shines a light on mutations in once obscure areas of the genome
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The truth about smart cities: 'In the end, they will destroy democracy' - The Guardian

The truth about smart cities: 'In the end, they will destroy democracy' - The Guardian | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The smart city is, to many urban thinkers, just a buzzphrase that has outlived its usefulness: ‘the wrong idea pitched in the wrong way to the wrong people’.
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Enthusiasts and Skeptics Debate Artificial Intelligence

Enthusiasts and Skeptics Debate Artificial Intelligence | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Kurt Andersen wonders: If the Singularity is near, will it bring about global techno-Nirvana or civilizational ruin?
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The Three Breakthroughs That Have Finally Unleashed AI on the World | WIRED

The Three Breakthroughs That Have Finally Unleashed AI on the World | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The AI on the horizon looks more like Amazon Web Services—cheap, reliable, industrial-grade digital smartness running behind everything, and almost invisible except when it blinks off. This is a big deal, and now it's here.
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Quantum Teleportation Reaches Farthest Distance Yet

Quantum Teleportation Reaches Farthest Distance Yet | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Physicists have teleported a light particle 15 miles (25 kilometers), making it the farthest quantum teleportation yet.

 

Advances in quantum teleportation could lead to better Internet and communication security, and get scientists closer to developing quantum computers. About five years ago, researchers could only teleport quantum information, such as which direction a particle is spinning, across a few meters. Now, they can beam that information across several miles.

 

Physicists can't instantly transport matter, but they can instantly transport information through quantum teleportation. This works thanks to a bizarre quantum mechanics property called entanglement. Quantum entanglement happens when two subatomic particles stay connected no matter how far apart they are. When one particle is disturbed, it instantly affects the entangled partner. It's impossible to tell the state of either particle until one is directly measured, but measuring one particle instantly determines the state of its partner.

 

In the new, record-breaking experiment, researchers from the University of Geneva, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the National Institute of Standards and Technology used a superfast laser to pump out photons. Every once in a while, two photons would become entangled. Once the researchers had an entangled pair, they sent one down the optical fiber and stored the other in a crystal at the end of the cable. Then, the researchers shot a third particle of light at the photon traveling down the cable. When the two collided, they obliterated each other.

 

Quantum information has already been transferred dozens of miles, but this is the farthest it's been transported using an optical fiber, and then recorded and stored at the other end. Other quantum teleportation experiments that beamed photons farther used lasers instead of optical fibers to send the information. But unlike the laser method, the optical-fiber method could eventually be used to develop technology like quantum computers that are capable of extremely fast computing, or quantum cryptography that could make secure communication possible.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Keith Wayne Brown's curator insight, December 10, 1:48 PM

the future information

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Cognitive technologies: Demystifying artificial intelligence

Cognitive technologies: Demystifying artificial intelligence | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Thanks to improving technical performance and billions of dollars of investments in commercialization, cognitive technologies are poised to have a growing…
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Demis Hassabis, Founder of DeepMind Technologies and Artificial Intelligence Wunderkind at Google, Wants Machines to Think Like Us

Demis Hassabis, Founder of DeepMind Technologies and Artificial Intelligence Wunderkind at Google, Wants Machines to Think Like Us | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The man behind a startup acquired by Google for $628 million plans to build a revolutionary new artificial intelligence.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Man vs. Machine: Will Computers Soon Become More Intelligent Than Us?

Man vs. Machine: Will Computers Soon Become More Intelligent Than Us? | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

Computers might soon become more intelligent than us. Some of the best brains in Silicon Valley are now trying to work out what happens next.


Nate Soares, a former Google engineer, is weighing up the chances of success for the project he is working on. He puts them at only about 5 per cent. But the odds he is calculating aren’t for some new smartphone app. Instead, Soares is talking about something much more arresting: whether programmers like him will be able to save mankind from extinction at the hands of its own most powerful creation.


The object of concern – both for him and the Machine Intelligence Research Institute (Miri), whose offices these are – is artificial intelligence (AI). Super-smart machines with malicious intent are a staple of science fiction, from the soft-spoken Hal 9000 to the scarily violent Skynet. But the AI that people like Soares believe is coming mankind’s way, very probably before the end of this century, would be much worse.


Besides Soares, there are probably only four computer scientists in the world currently working on how to programme the super-smart machines of the not-too-distant future to make sure AI remains “friendly”, says Luke Muehlhauser, Miri’s director. It isn’t unusual to hear people express big thoughts about the future in Silicon Valley these days – though most of the technology visions are much more benign. It sometimes sounds as if every entrepreneur, however trivial the start-up, has taken a leaf from Google’s mission statement and is out to “make the world a better place”.


Warnings have lately grown louder. Astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, writing earlier this year, said that AI would be “the biggest event in human history”. But he added: “Unfortunately, it might also be the last.”


Elon Musk – whose successes with electric cars (through Tesla Motors) and private space flight (SpaceX) have elevated him to almost superhero status in Silicon Valley – has also spoken up. Several weeks ago, he advised his nearly 1.2 million Twitter followers to read Superintelligence, a book about the dangers of AI, which has made him think the technology is “potentially more dangerous than nukes”. Mankind, as Musk sees it, might be like a computer program whose usefulness ends once it has started up a more complex piece of software. “Hope we’re not just the biological boot loader for digital superintelligence,” he tweeted. “Unfortunately, that is increasingly probable.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Evolution of Robotics

The Evolution of Robotics | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
How has robotics evolved? This interactive timeline shows the remarkable expansion in robotics applications since the 1950s—from the factory floor to the home.
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First digital animal will be perfect copy of real worm - tech - 26 November 2014 - New Scientist

First digital animal will be perfect copy of real worm - tech - 26 November 2014 - New Scientist | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Next year the world's first digital animal will be born inside a computer. Could its descendants be conscious?
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Emergence: A unifying theme for 21st century science

Emergence: A unifying theme for 21st century science | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

When electrons or atoms or individuals or societies interact with one another or their environment, the collective behavior of the whole is different from that of its parts. We call this resulting behavior emergent. Emergence thus refers to collective phenomena or behaviors in complex adaptive systems that are not present in their individual parts.


By David Pines, Co-Founder in Residence, Santa Fe Institute

https://medium.com/sfi-30-foundations-frontiers/emergence-a-unifying-theme-for-21st-century-science-4324ac0f951e


Via Complexity Digest
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Fibonacci quasiparticles could form basis of future topological quantum computers (TQC)

Fibonacci quasiparticles could form basis of future topological quantum computers (TQC) | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Topological quantum computing (TQC) is a newer type of quantum computing that uses "braids" of particle tracks, rather than actual particles such as ions and electrons, as the qubits to implement computations. Using braids has one important advantage: it makes TQCs practically immune to the small perturbations in the environment that cause decoherence in particle-based qubits and often lead to high error rates.

 

Ever since TQC was first proposed in 1997, experimentally realizing the appropriate braids has been extremely difficult. For one thing, the braids are formed not by the trajectories of ordinary particles, but by the trajectories of exotic quasiparticles (particle-like excitations) called anyons. Also, movements of the anyons must be non-Abelian, a property similar to the non-commutative property in which changing the order of the anyons' movements changes their final tracks. In most proposals of TQC so far, the non-Abelian statistics of the anyons has not been powerful enough, even in theory, for universal TQC.


Now in a new study published in Physical Review Letters, physicists Abolhassan Vaezi at Cornell University and Maissam Barkeshli at Microsoft's research lab Station Q have theoretically shown that anyons tunneling in a double-layer system can transition to an exotic non-Abelian state that contains "Fibonacci" anyons that are powerful enough for universal TQC.


"Our work suggests that some existing experimental setups are rich enough to yield a phase capable of performing 'universal' TQC, i.e., all of the required logical gates for the performance of a quantum computer can be made through the braiding of anyons only," Vaezi told Phys.org. "Since braiding is a topological operation and does not perturb the low-energy physics, the resulting quantum computer is fault-tolerant."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Internet of Things and the Connected Person - Wired

The Internet of Things and the Connected Person - Wired | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
One of the interesting things about the Internet of Things (IoT): It’s not really about the things. The IoT is a developing technological marvel.
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AI Recognizes Cats the Same Way Physicists Calculate the Cosmos | WIRED

AI Recognizes Cats the Same Way Physicists Calculate the Cosmos | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
New research suggests physicists, computers and brains employ the same procedure to tease out important features from among other irrelevant bits of data.
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Can Life Be Mimicked in Silicon? | MIT Technology Review

A microfluidic cell copies some basic functions of life.
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Innotribe/SWIFT: Can Banks Master Disruptive Innovation? - Forbes

Innotribe/SWIFT: Can Banks Master Disruptive Innovation? - Forbes | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A whirlwind of innovation activity is under way in FinTech, but risks remain high
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Why we must not stall technological progress, despite its threat to humanity

Why we must not stall technological progress, despite its threat to humanity | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Anil Seth: Stephen Hawking is right to say AI poses a risk to our species, and we must heed such warnings. But we must also progress
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Artificial intelligence: how clever do we want our machines to be?

Artificial intelligence: how clever do we want our machines to be? | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The theory of artificial intelligence is already fact in some areas of life, yet as its importance grows, how do we ensure we control it rather than vice versa, asks Alex Hern
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What’s Missing from the Industrial Internet of Things Conversation? Software | WIRED

What’s Missing from the Industrial Internet of Things Conversation? Software | WIRED | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
These days, you can hardly have a technology conversation without talking about the Internet of Things (IoT). And when that conversation shifts its focus to the industrial sector, including energy, Oil & Gas, Power & Utilities, and petrochemicals, among others, the discussion changes to what is being called the “Industrial Internet of Things” (IIoT). So…
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On “How We Became Post-Human” - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

On “How We Became Post-Human” - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Hayles has written a complex and erudite book on the hidden premises and visible consequences of the information age.
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LHCb observes two new baryon particles | CERN

LHCb observes two new baryon particles | CERN | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Today the collaboration for the LHCb experiment at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider announced the discovery of two new particles in the baryon family. The particles, known as the Xi_b'- and Xi_b*-, were predicted to exist by the quark model but had never been seen before. A related particle, the Xi_b*0, was found by the CMS experiment at CERN in 2012. The LHCb collaboration submitted a paper reporting the finding to Physical Review Letters.
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