Systems Theory
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Systems Theory
theoretical aspects of (social) systems theory
Curated by Ben van Lier
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The Internet of Things: Wholism and Evolution

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New blogpost: The internet of things: Wholism and Evolution

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The Universe May Have Always Existed, According to New Scientific Model - The Cubic Lane

The Universe May Have Always Existed, According to New Scientific Model - The Cubic Lane | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
New Model About the Development of the Universe - By creating a new model combining at once the principles of quantum mechanics and the theory of General Relativity of Albert Einstein, two physicists have reached a confusing conclusion, the...
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Building AI to Play by Any Rules - IEEE Spectrum

Building AI to Play by Any Rules - IEEE Spectrum | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A new breed of AI could be smart enough to adapt to any set of rules in games and real life
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The Invisible Economy

Our techniques for measuring economic performance are obsolete, obscuring a complete picture of how we're faring.
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The Conscious Web: When The Internet Of Things Becomes Artificially Intelligent

The Conscious Web: When The Internet Of Things Becomes Artificially Intelligent | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Will our self-programming computers send out hostile orders to the chips we've added to our everyday objects? Or is this just another disruptive moment, similar to the harnessing of steam or the splitting of the atom?...
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If software looks like a brain and acts like a brain—will we treat it like one?

If software looks like a brain and acts like a brain—will we treat it like one? | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
How we treat brain emulations may ultimately dictate how we treat ourselves.
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The Hot Yet Little-Known Trend That’ll Supercharge AI

The Hot Yet Little-Known Trend That’ll Supercharge AI | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
When Andrew Ng trained Google’s army of computers to identify cat videos using artificial intelligence, he hit a few snags.

Via Spaceweaver
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Are We Smart Enough to Control Artificial Intelligence? | MIT Technology Review

Are We Smart Enough to Control Artificial Intelligence? | MIT Technology Review | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A true AI might ruin the world—but that assumes it’s possible at all.
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Are We Smart Enough to Control Artificial Intelligence? | MIT Technology Review

Are We Smart Enough to Control Artificial Intelligence? | MIT Technology Review | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A true AI might ruin the world—but that assumes it’s possible at all.
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BrainGate Develops a Wireless Brain-Computer Interface | MIT Technology Review

BrainGate Develops a Wireless Brain-Computer Interface | MIT Technology Review | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
A wireless transmitter could give paralyzed people a practical way to control TVs, computers, or wheelchairs with their thoughts.
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D-Wave Systems Raises C$29 Million to Build Quantum-Computing Software - Wall Street Journal (blog)

D-Wave Systems Raises C$29 Million to Build Quantum-Computing Software - Wall Street Journal (blog) | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
So far, D-Wave is the only quantum computing company with technology on the market.

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Building Robots With Better Morals Than Humans - The Atlantic

Building Robots With Better Morals Than Humans - The Atlantic | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Bill Gates says he's concerned about the decisions machines of the near future will make once they outsmart humans.
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The case against killer robots, from a guy actually working on artificial intelligence

The case against killer robots, from a guy actually working on artificial intelligence | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Andrew Ng builds artificial intelligence systems for a living.

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Facebook AI Director Yann LeCun on His Quest to Unleash Deep Learning and Make Machines Smarter - IEEE Spectrum

Facebook AI Director Yann LeCun on His Quest to Unleash Deep Learning and Make Machines Smarter - IEEE Spectrum | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The Deep Learning expert explains how convolutional nets work, why Facebook needs AI, what he dislikes about the Singularity, and more
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This swarm of 1,024 tiny robots work in sync (Wired UK)

This swarm of 1,024 tiny robots work in sync (Wired UK) | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
These mechanical shape-shifters are changing the way robots work together
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The Embarrassment of Complexity - blogs.hbr.org (blog)

The Embarrassment of Complexity - blogs.hbr.org (blog) | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

'The Embarrassment of Complexity' is what unavoidably happens as silos which have externalised more than they sustainably can try to reconnect to tackle real world issues through oversimplified interfaces which ignore non-linearity and worse.


Via John Symons, Tony Smith
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Tony Smith's curator insight, October 15, 2013 8:37 PM

Just when I was starting to enjoy my notional retirement: "This is why what I call competent rebels are needed everywhere: individuals who are able to combine professional capabilities with the fresh, challenging outlook required for progress."

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New Haptics That Can Trick Your Sense of Touch Could Be Crucial to Smartwatches and Virtual Reality | MIT Technology Review

New Haptics That Can Trick Your Sense of Touch Could Be Crucial to Smartwatches and Virtual Reality | MIT Technology Review | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Touch feedback that’s more nuanced than a simple buzz could make virtual reality more real and cars safer.
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Is AI Dangerous? That Depends… | Life, Unbounded, Scientific American Blog Network

Is AI Dangerous? That Depends… | Life, Unbounded, Scientific American Blog Network | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Somewhere in the long list of topics that are relevant to astrobiology is the question of 'intelligence'. Is human-like, technological intelligence likely to be common across ...
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Is AI Dangerous? That Depends… | Life, Unbounded, Scientific American Blog Network

Is AI Dangerous? That Depends… | Life, Unbounded, Scientific American Blog Network | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Somewhere in the long list of topics that are relevant to astrobiology is the question of 'intelligence'. Is human-like, technological intelligence likely to be common across ...
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Digital Reality | Edge.org

Digital Reality | Edge.org | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

...Today, you can send a design to a fab lab and you need ten different machines to turn the data into something. Twenty years from now, all of that will be in one machine that fits in your pocket. This is the sense in which it doesn't matter. You can do it today. How it works today isn't how it's going to work in the future but you don't need to wait twenty years for it. Anybody can make almost anything almost anywhere.              

...Finally, when I could own all these machines I got that the Renaissance was when the liberal arts emerged—liberal for liberation, humanism, the trivium and the quadrivium—and those were a path to liberation, they were the means of expression. That's the moment when art diverged from artisans. And there were the illiberal arts that were for commercial gain. ... We've been living with this notion that making stuff is an illiberal art for commercial gain and it's not part of means of expression. But, in fact, today, 3D printing, micromachining, and microcontroller programming are as expressive as painting paintings or writing sonnets but they're not means of expression from the Renaissance. We can finally fix that boundary between art and artisans.


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The Man Who Tried to Redeem the World with Logic - Issue 21: Information - Nautilus

The Man Who Tried to Redeem the World with Logic - Issue 21: Information - Nautilus | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
Walter Pitts was used to being bullied. He’d been born into a tough family in Prohibition-era Detroit, where his father, a boiler-maker,…
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How Connected Cars Have Established A New Ecosystem Powered By IoT

How Connected Cars Have Established A New Ecosystem Powered By IoT | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

Not long ago, after you bought a new vehicle, the manufacturer had very little contact with you for years until it was time to sell you another car. The Internet of Things is changing all that. The IoT-enabled “connected car” turns the vehicle itself into a hub for an entire ecosystem of connected services that offer consumers a wealth of benefits including enhanced safety and security, a richer user experience and a new suite of product offerings. From the manufacturer’s perspective, this also helps establish an ongoing customer relationship as well as incremental revenue streams over the life of the vehicle.

 


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Researchers show a machine learning network for connected devices

Researchers show a machine learning network for connected devices | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

Researchers at Ohio State University have developed a method for building a machine learning algorithm from data gathered from a variety of connected devices. There are two cool things about their model worth noting. The first is that the model is distributed and second, it can keep data private.


The researchers call their model Crowd-ML and the idea is pretty basic. Each device runs a version of a necessary app, much like one might run a version of SETI@home or other distributed computing application, and grabs samples of data to send to a central server. The server can tell when enough of the right data has been gathered to “teach” the computer and only grabs the data it needs, ensuring a relative amount of privacy.


The model uses a variant of stochastic (sub)gradient descent instead of batch processing, to grab data for machine learning, which is what makes the Crowd-ML effort different. Stochastic gradient descent is the basis for a lot of machine learning and deep learning efforts. It uses knowledge gleaned from previous computations to inform the next computations, making it iterative, as opposed to something processed all at once.


The paper goes on to describe how one can tweak the Crowd-ML model to ensure more or less privacy and process information faster or in greater amounts. It tries to achieve the happy medium between protecting privacy and gathering the right amount of data to generate a decent sample size to train the machine learning algorithm.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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NASA, Microsoft Collaboration Will Allow Scientists to 'Work on Mars'

NASA, Microsoft Collaboration Will Allow Scientists to 'Work on Mars' | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will enable scientists to work virtually on Mars using wearable technology called Microsoft HoloLens.

Developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, OnSight will give scientists a means to plan and, along with the Mars Curiosity rover, conduct science operations on the Red Planet.

"OnSight gives our rover scientists the ability to walk around and explore Mars right from their offices," said Dave Lavery, program executive for the Mars Science Laboratory mission at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "It fundamentally changes our perception of Mars, and how we understand the Mars environment surrounding the rover."

OnSight will use real rover data and extend the Curiosity mission's existing planning tools by creating a 3-D simulation of the Martian environment where scientists around the world can meet. Program scientists will be able to examine the rover's worksite from a first-person perspective, plan new activities and preview the results of their work firsthand.

"We believe OnSight will enhance the ways in which we explore Mars and share that journey of exploration with the world," said Jeff Norris, JPL's OnSight project manager.

Until now, rover operations required scientists to examine Mars imagery on a computer screen, and make inferences about what they are seeing. But images, even 3-D stereo views, lack a natural sense of depth that human vision employs to understand spatial relationships.

The OnSight system uses holographic computing to overlay visual information and rover data into the user's field of view. Holographic computing blends a view of the physical world with computer-generated imagery to create a hybrid of real and virtual.

To view this holographic realm, members of the Curiosity mission team don a Microsoft HoloLens device, which surrounds them with images from the rover's Martian field site. They then can stroll around the rocky surface or crouch down to examine rocky outcrops from different angles. The tool provides access to scientists and engineers looking to interact with Mars in a more natural, human way.

"Previously, our Mars explorers have been stuck on one side of a computer screen. This tool gives them the ability to explore the rover's surroundings much as an Earth geologist would do field work here on our planet," said Norris.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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