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Systems Theory
theoretical aspects of (social) systems theory
Curated by Ben van Lier
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Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Cyborgs_Transhumanism
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Can #robots be trusted to know right from wrong? | #algorithms #morality

Can #robots be trusted to know right from wrong? | #algorithms #morality | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
HAL 9000 (credit: Warner Bros.) Is it possible to develop moral autonomous robots with a sense for right, wrong, and the consequences of

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luiy's curator insight, May 13, 2014 12:50 PM

Is it possible to develop “moral” autonomous robots with a sense for right, wrong, and the consequences of both?

 

Researchers from Tufts University, Brown University, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute think so, and are teaming with the U.S. Navy to explore technology that would pave the way to do exactly that.

“Moral competence can be roughly thought about as the ability to learn, reason with, act upon, and talk about the laws and societal conventions on which humans tend to agree,” says principal investigator Matthias Scheutz, professor of computer science at Tufts School of Engineering and director of the Human-Robot Interaction Laboratory (HRI Lab) at Tufts.

 

“The question is whether machines — or any other artificial system, for that matter — can emulate and exercise these abilities.”

But since there’s no universal agreement on the morality of laws and societal conventions, this raises some interesting questions. Was HAL 9000 (HAL = (Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic computer) moral? Who defines morality?

 
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Cyborgs_Transhumanism
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#Robots with "soul" | #posthumanism

What kind of robots does an animator / jazz musician / roboticist make? Playful, reactive, curious ones. Guy Hoffman shows demo film of his family of unusual robots -- including two musical bots that like to jam with humans.

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Claude Emond's curator insight, January 19, 2014 10:46 AM

Real robots enjoying music and interacting with the public. Very cool. Shape of things to come in posthumanity :)

Claude Emond's comment, January 19, 2014 5:40 PM
Bienvenu, Luis
luiy's comment, January 19, 2014 5:41 PM
Thanks Claude,
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Cyborgs_Transhumanism
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Baxter and the Second Machine Age — A revolution in mental power | #work #robots #change

Baxter and the Second Machine Age — A revolution in mental power | #work #robots #change | Systems Theory | Scoop.it
The following is adapted from The Second Machine Age by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, out now in hardcover.

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Claude Emond's curator insight, February 7, 2014 4:46 PM

«Computers and other digital advances are doing for mental power what the steam engine and its descendants did for muscle power.»

luiy's curator insight, February 8, 2014 7:08 PM

Baxter is instantly recognizable as a humanoid robot. It has two burly, jointed arms with claw-like grips for hands; a torso; and a head with an LCD face that swivels to ‘look at’ the nearest person. It doesn’t have legs, though; Rethink sidestepped the enormous challenges of automatic locomotion by putting Baxter on wheels and having it rely on people to get from place to place. The company’s analyses suggest that it can still do lots of useful work without the ability to move under his own power.