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Systems Theory
theoretical aspects of (social) systems theory
Curated by Ben van Lier
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The Future of Artificial Intelligence

The Future of Artificial Intelligence | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

Robots are here to stay. They will be smarter, more versatile, more autonomous, and more like us in many ways. We humans will need to adapt to keep up.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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luiy's curator insight, March 25, 2013 5:36 PM
New technologies, new moralities

Religious and other organizations will define and attempt to regulate the ways in which human treat humanoid robots, since they will be considered quasi-human, sentient creatures that must be treated with respect and not abused. Thus, the changing legal and social framework will deal with the proper use of robots by humans as well as the proper behavior of robots toward humans, and new sets of “post-Asimov” laws will emerge.

 

Finally, a few concluding thoughts. The rapid increase in the number and sophistication of autonomous systems, including humanoid robots, lead to dramatic changes in society. Robots will assume an increasing share of human work and responsibility, thus creating a major social problem with unemployment and the relations of humans and robots. I believe that new frameworks for these interactions will emerge within the next 25 to 50 years. If they do not, there may be neo-Luddite rebellions, in which humans will attempt to destroy large numbers of robots. Those of us who design, program, and implement robots have a major responsibility to assist in the creation and implementation of patterns of behavior and legal systems to ensure that robots and humans co-evolve and co-exist for the benefit of society.

 

Robots are here to stay. They will be smarter, more versatile, more autonomous, and more like us in many ways. We humans will need to adapt to this coming world.

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The Robotics Revolution

Whether it is a report about the latest drone strike into Pakistan or an awesome web video of a cute robot dancing in the latest style, it seems like robots are taking over the world, figuratively if not yet literally. But within their growing appearance in the news is perhaps something bigger, a story that is reshaping the overall history of war and politics, and even humanity.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Martin Talks
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'Moral' Robots: the Future of War or Dystopian Fiction?

'Moral' Robots: the Future of War or Dystopian Fiction? | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

The dawn of the 21st century has been called the decade of the drone. Unmanned aerial vehicles, remotely operated by pilots in the United States, rain Hellfire missiles on suspected insurgents in South Asia and the Middle East.

Now a small group of scholars is grappling with what some believe could be the next generation of weaponry: lethal autonomous robots. At the center of the debate is Ronald C. Arkin, a Georgia Tech professor who has hypothesized lethal weapons systems that are ethically superior to human soldiers on the battlefield. A professor of robotics and ethics, he has devised algorithms for an "ethical governor" that he says could one day guide an aerial drone or ground robot to either shoot or hold its fire in accordance with internationally agreed-upon rules of war.


Via Martin Talks, Szabolcs Kósa, Artur Coelho
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Beyond Asimov: the struggle to develop a legal framework for robots

Beyond Asimov: the struggle to develop a legal framework for robots | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

"Robots are no longer science fiction, as they have left the factory and are arriving in our homes," says Salvini from the BioRobotics Institute at the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna (SSSA) in Pisa, Italy. And Asimov's Three Laws simply aren't sufficient.
As part of the unique EU-backed €1.5 million RoboLaw Project, Salvini is managing a team of roboticists, lawyers and philosophers (yes, philosophers) from a consortium of European universities, who are working hard to come up with proposals for the laws and regulations necessary to manage emerging robotics technologies in Europe in time to present them to European Commission a year from now. The consortium comprises the University of Tilburg (the Netherlands), the Humboldt University of Berlin, the University of Reading and the SSSA.


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Sophie Martin's curator insight, March 19, 2013 5:19 AM

 

What laws, how to define them about such unconceivable object …heu…thing…euh person? Well some note :
"I can't define a robot, but I know one when I see one"(Joseph Engelberger, one of the fathers of robotics)
The list, says Salvini, takes into account autonomous robots, including neurobiotics -- robots controlled via a brain-computer interface -- and service robots that operate in the home, cities and other public roles.
"These are exactly the kind of problems that roboticists will struggle with, as while they need to test their robots outside of the laboratory they are not always good at dealing with the social and legal environment."
After all, there are some schools of thought see robots as autonomous individuals with the same or comparable rights as those of humans. "Or how do you actually describe a robot? You can address it like an animal or pet, but if your dog attacks someone then you are liable."
‘A key issue is the lack of public awareness and debate about these issues. "So many people see our research as 'science fiction work', although we are working mainly on problems society is facing right now," explains Beck, adding that it's necessary to inform society about the existing research -- often taking place behind closed doors -- and potential applications.”
"After all, lawyers cannot answer questions for society." Society has first to decide which robots it wants to accept, which risks it wants to take, who should be responsible for damages caused by robots, she warns.”
Ect ….ect …
hughrlk...
Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Man and Machine
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The Robotics Revolution

Whether it is a report about the latest drone strike into Pakistan or an awesome web video of a cute robot dancing in the latest style, it seems like robots are taking over the world, figuratively if not yet literally. But within their growing appearance in the news is perhaps something bigger, a story that is reshaping the overall history of war and politics, and even humanity.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Martin Talks
more...
No comment yet.