Systems Theory
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Systems Theory
theoretical aspects of (social) systems theory
Curated by Ben van Lier
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Better Brain Implant

Better Brain Implant | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

A thin, flexible electrode, developed at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., is 10 times smaller than the nearest competition, looking to make long-term measurements of neural activity practical at last.
This kind of technology could eventually find use in sending signals to prosthetic limbs, overcoming inflammation larger electrodes cause that damages both the brain and the electrodes.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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luiy's curator insight, April 6, 2013 6:37 AM

A thin, flexible electrode, developed at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., is 10 times smaller than the nearest competition, looking to make long-term measurements of neural activity practical at last.

This kind of technology could eventually find use in sending signals to prosthetic limbs, overcoming inflammation larger electrodes cause that damages both the brain and the electrodes.

 

The main problem that neurons have with electrodes is that they make terrible neighbors. In addition to being enormous compared to neurons, they are stiff and tend to rub nearby cells the wrong way. The resident immune cells spot the foreigner and attack, inflaming the brain tissue and blocking communication between the electrode and the cells.

The new electrode developed by the teams of Daryl Kipke, a professor of biomedical engineering, Joerg Lahann, a professor of chemical engineering, and Nicholas Kotov, the Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka professor of engineering, is unobtrusive and even friendly in comparison. It is a thread of highly conductive carbon fiber, coated in plastic to block out signals from other neurons. The conductive gel pad at the end cozies up to soft cell membranes, and that close connection means the signals from brain cells come in much clearer.

Rescooped by Ben van Lier from Global Brain
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Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface

Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface | Systems Theory | Scoop.it

Brown’s wireless BCI, fashioned out of hermetically sealed titanium, looks a lot like a pacemaker. Inside there’s a li-ion battery, an inductive (wireless) charging loop, a chip that digitizes the signals from your brain, and an antenna for transmitting those neural spikes to a nearby computer. The BCI is connected to a small chip with 100 electrodes protruding from it, which, in this study, was embedded in the somatosensory cortex or motor cortex. These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away. The BCI’s battery takes two hours to charge via wireless inductive charging, and then has enough juice to last for six hours of use.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Tania Kowritski, The Asymptotic Leap, Spaceweaver
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Nacho Vega's curator insight, March 5, 2013 5:10 AM

Where do we go?!!!

Gust MEES's curator insight, March 5, 2013 4:17 PM

 

These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away.