Systems in our Selves
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A philosopher’s 350-year-old trick to get people to change their minds is now backed up by psychologists

A philosopher’s 350-year-old trick to get people to change their minds is now backed up by psychologists | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
The 17th century philosopher Blaise Pascal is perhaps best known for Pascal’s Wager which, in the first formal use of decision theory, argued that believing in God is the most pragmatic decision. But it seems the French thinker also had a knack for psychology. As Brain Pickings points out, Pascal set out the most effectiv
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The specialist–generalist continuum

The specialist–generalist continuum | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
The Greek poet Archilochus observed that the hedgehog knows one big thing but that the fox is curious about many things. His anthropomorphic distinction between specialism and generalism appealed to the Renaissance scholar Erasmus who included the idea in his Adages. Isaiah Berlin popularised the concept further as he assessed the writings of Tolstoy and…

Via Josie Gibson
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How Your Job Shapes Your Identity

How Your Job Shapes Your Identity | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
When we meet new people, we’re tempted to ask: 'what do you do?' We’re picking up on the idea that our identity is very linked to our daily tasks. But the way the question is answered tends to lock on to the practical externals of our jobs. So a dental hygienist will explain how they k
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Six ways being tired can damage your life

Six ways being tired can damage your life | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it

Scientists are finding that lack of sleep affects people in profound ways unimaginable just a decade ago.

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Afraid Of Being 'Found Out?' How To Overcome Impostor Syndrome

Afraid Of Being 'Found Out?' How To Overcome Impostor Syndrome | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
Impostor Syndrome is the domain of the high-achiever. Those who often fear being "found out" have a tendency to attribute their success to external factors – like luck or a helping hand. Unsurprisingly, women tend to do this more often than men who are are more likely to attribute their successes to a combination of internal factors, such as grit, talent, brains and sheer hard work.

Via Josie Gibson
Jason Leong's insight:

"High achievers tend to focus more on what they haven’t done versus what they have.   Take Dr. Margaret Chan, Chief of the World HealthOrganization, for example.  She once said: ”There are an awful lot of people out there who think I’m an expert. How do these people believe all this about me? I’m so much aware of all the things I don’t know.”"

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The Island of Knowledge: How to Live with Mystery in a Culture Obsessed with Certainty and Definitive Answers

The Island of Knowledge: How to Live with Mystery in a Culture Obsessed with Certainty and Definitive Answers | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it

Because much of Nature remains hidden from us, our view of the world is based only on the fraction of reality that we can measure and analyze. Science, as our narrative describing what we see and what we conjecture exists in the natural world, is thus necessarily limited, telling only part of the story.

 

We strive toward knowledge, always more knowledge, but must understand that we are, and will remain, surrounded by mystery. It is the flirting with this mystery, the urge to go beyond the boundaries of the known, that feeds our creative impulse, that makes us want to know more.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Jason Leong's insight:

"Gleiser admonishes against the limiting notion that we only have two options — staunch scientism, with its blind faith in science’s ability to permanently solve the mysteries of the unknown, and religious obscurantism, with its superstitious avoidance of inconvenient facts. Instead, he offers a third approach “based on how an understanding of the way we probe reality can be a source of endless inspiration without the need for setting final goals or promises of eternal truths.” In an assertion that invokes Sagan’s famous case for the vital balance between skepticism and openness, Gleiser writes:


'This unsettled existence is the very blood of science. Science needs to fail to move forward. Theories need to break down; their limits need to be exposed. As tools probe deeper into Nature, they expose the cracks of old theories and allow new ones to emerge. However, we should not be fooled into believing that this process has an end.'"

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, February 2, 2015 9:09 AM

A curated story by Maria Popova from Brain Pickings of astrophysicist and philosopher Marcelo Gleiser's book: The Island of Knowledge: The Limits of Science and the Search for Meaning.

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What Maslow’s Hierarchy Won’t Tell You About Motivation

What Maslow’s Hierarchy Won’t Tell You About Motivation | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it

Despite the popularity of Maslow’s Hierarchy, there is not much recent data to support it. Contemporary science — specifically Dr. Edward Deci, hundreds of Self-Determination Theory researchers, and thousands of studies — instead points to three universal psychological needs. If you really want to advantage of this new science – rather than focusing on a pyramid of needs – you should focus on: autonomy, relatedness, and competence.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Jason Leong's insight:

"Despite the popularity of Maslow’s Hierarchy, there is not much recent data to support it. Contemporary science [...] instead points to three universal psychological needs. If you really want to [take] advantage of this new science – rather than focusing on a pyramid of needs – you should focus on: autonomy, relatedness, and competence."

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Lauran Star's curator insight, November 28, 2014 4:06 PM

Understanding what motivates you brings greater success!

 

Sue Gaardboe's curator insight, November 28, 2014 4:55 PM

This struck such a cord with me.  I can pin point the moment when I recognised that my life was my responsibility, and can see the energy that flowed from that realisation and how it's influenced every decision and action in my life. We introduce the idea to our students in a general way, (Why is it your Mum's fault that you left your homework at home?Isn't it your responsibility?) but certainly don't help them to appreciate it deeply in their lives.

Steven Verjans's curator insight, April 15, 10:04 AM
Harvard Business Review article about Maslow's hierarchy of needs, and Deci & Ryan's self-determination theory.
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The psychology of making purchases with cash and credit

The psychology of making purchases with cash and credit | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
Dr Paul Harrison takes a look at the psychology of cash, credit and debit and investigates whether your card can help you lose weight .
Jason Leong's insight:

"Mode of payment had a significant effect on participants identified as ‘tightwads’, who were likely to spend 56 per cent more on impulse products when they used a card than when they used cash. The researchers’ conclusion was that cards weaken impulse control, particularly for those people who normally would be very careful with their money."

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Junior Designers vs. Senior Designers

Junior Designers vs. Senior Designers - The Year of the Looking Glass - Medium
I like words a lot. But sometimes a few sketches communicate a point more simply and memorably.
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Imagination, reality flow in opposite directions in the brain

Imagination, reality flow in opposite directions in the brain | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
As real as that daydream may seem, its path through your brain runs opposite reality. Aiming to discern discrete neural circuits, researchers have tracked electrical activity in the brains of people who alternately imagined scenes or watched videos.
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The Four Truths of the Storyteller

I’m in the business of creating compelling stories. As a filmmaker, I need to understand how stories touch audiences—why one story is an instantly appealing box office success while another fails miserably to connect. I’ve been fortunate enough to work with some of the world’s most talented storytellers—gifted directors, novelists, screenwriters, actors, and other producers—and from them I’ve gleaned insights into the alchemy of great stories. 


Via Josie Gibson
Jason Leong's insight:

Truth to the Teller; Truth to the Audience; Truth to the Moment; Truth to the Mission - a recipe for powerful storytelling.

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The Science of Why We Don’t Believe Science — Mother Jones — Medium

The Science of Why We Don’t Believe Science — Mother Jones — Medium | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
And that undercuts the standard notion that the way to persuade people is via evidence and argument. In fact, head-on attempts to persuade can sometimes trigger a backfire effect, where people not only fail to change their minds when confronted with the facts—they may hold their wrong views more tenaciously than ever.
Jason Leong's insight:

Read this... And understand that we are all biased, and that colours everything we see, read and think.

Also, confrontation is not the best way to get the point across.

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Think big, be free, have sex … 10 reasons to be an existentialist

Think big, be free, have sex … 10 reasons to be an existentialist | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
The existentialists asked the essential questions – and still have much to offer us today. So don your turtleneck and make like Sartre and De Beauvoir
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How To Make Your Stress Work In Your Favour

How To Make Your Stress Work In Your Favour | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it

Sometimes, stress can seem like a full-time job. Many of us try to avoid it or, failing that, manage or mitigate it. But, Kelly McGonigal, a lecturer at Stanford University and author of The Upside of Stress, makes the case for embracing the stress in your life.

 

"We have this story about stress that says when stress is present, there’s something wrong with me or something wrong with my life," she says. But the reality is that there’s no stress-free version of your life available to you—it’s always going to be there.

 

Often, the reason we have stress in our lives is because we’re leading rich lives and something we care about is at stake, she says. Constantly avoiding or reducing stress could mean not striving for certain goals or taking risks that could lead to great rewards, such as a new job or relationship.

 

Instead, McGonigal advocates changing our attitudes about stress and embracing it. That’s easier said than done, but following several steps can help.


Via The Learning Factor
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Ian Berry's curator insight, August 20, 2015 4:21 AM

Some great suggestions to thriving in a world of uncertainty and where it's very easy to feel overhwelmed

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 20, 2015 6:18 AM

My associate Director keeps saying that stress is good, at first I wondered how this could be, but then on thinking deeply, I wondered if there was some truth in his statement. The article stresses how stress is good, and that it is the offshoot of a rich life. Also, stress is the welcome feeling that makes you connect and share, and stress can in some ways be the tonic that does wonders. However this can be done only if we are able to tune in to our stress and try to eliminate the irritants and obstacles that aggravate a feeling of frustration. Also stress is a catalyst for building relationships in life. Stress teaches us to take the good with the bad, to tune in to feelings of anger, frustration, and fatige and learn to balance these with a feeling of elation. Stress makes us more practical in a sense that we know quite well that it is OK to experience failure some times.

Irene Mohloai's curator insight, August 22, 2015 6:51 AM

Something totally unrelated to ecommerce but is essential that we know how to manage.

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8 Reasons Why You Should Definitely Take That Lunch Break

8 Reasons Why You Should Definitely Take That Lunch Break | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
It's not easy to squeeze in a lunch break, but it's often necessary for our health and sanity. Here are eight things you can do on your break that...
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Creativity and Sensory Gating

Creativity and Sensory Gating | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
Creative people’s brains are not good at filtering out sensory information.
Jason Leong's insight:

"Our recent work provides first physiological evidence that creativity may indeed be associated with the reduced ability to filter our “irrelevant” sensory information."

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Why Certainty Matters in Business

Why Certainty Matters in Business | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it

Most people do not think much about certainty, but it governs most of what they do. “Certainty is the catalyst that turns attitudes into action,” says Zakary Tormala, a psychologist and associate professor of marketing in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. His research, with Derek D. Rucker of Northwestern University, among others, has applications for executives, pollsters, and anyone who has an interest in spurring people to action. Managers who understand certainty can better groom leaders in their organizations.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 28, 2015 3:21 AM

A psychologist explores what makes our attitudes change over time.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 29, 2015 10:42 PM

We would like to think that certainty is certain and there is a backdrop which against which much happens. Having said this, there are many uncertain things.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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What Everybody Needs

"The more personal you are willing to be and the more intimate you are willing to be about the details of your own life, the more universal
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Cancer often due to biological bad luck, Johns Hopkins University researchers say - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Cancer often due to biological bad luck, Johns Hopkins University researchers say - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
Jason Leong's insight:

"They looked at 31 cancer types and found that 22 of them [65%], including leukaemia and pancreatic, bone, testicular, ovarian and brain cancer, could be explained largely by these random mutations - essentially biological bad luck." 

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An Almost Foolproof Way to Achieve Every Goal You Set

An Almost Foolproof Way to Achieve Every Goal You Set | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
Step One: Stop focusing on the actual goal.
Jason Leong's insight:

Humans totally underestimate the amount we can achieve over time through regular effort.

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Here's Why, How, And What You Should Doodle To Boost Your Memory And Creativity

Here's Why, How, And What You Should Doodle To Boost Your Memory And Creativity | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
The author of The Doodle Revolution explains how this common time waster is really a creative launch-pad.
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Bitter coffee today? Try changing the colour of your cup

Bitter coffee today? Try changing the colour of your cup | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
In Australia, around a billion cups of coffee a year are consumed in cafés, restaurants and other outlets. Even Britain, a nation famous for its fondness for tea, has in recent years seen a dramatic rise…
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The Source of Bad Writing

The Source of Bad Writing | Systems in our Selves | Scoop.it
The 'curse of knowledge,' writes Steven Pinker, is the result of writers' assuming readers understand the subject. This causes bad writing. Good explanations start with imagining what it's like to be ignorant of a subject

Via Josie Gibson
Jason Leong's insight:

"The curse of knowledge is the single best explanation of why good people write bad prose. It simply doesn't occur to the writer that her readers don't know what she knows—that they haven't mastered the argot of her guild, can't divine the missing steps that seem too obvious to mention, have no way to visualize a scene that to her is as clear as day. And so the writer doesn't bother to explain the jargon, or spell out the logic, or supply the necessary detail."

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