Systems for Producing Goods & Services
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As I Grew Older by Ian Abdulla

As I Grew Older by Ian Abdulla | Systems for Producing Goods & Services | Scoop.it

Ian Abdulla's family, like many others, relied on traditional skills to survive; the river sustained them, providing them with food, cash, and seasonal jobs.

 

Outcome:

SSS1.7 - Explain how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants.

Subject Matter:

1.  Interconnections between technologies, workers, users, and the environment

2.  Personal needs and wants

3.  Systems for producing goods and services.

Adam Steinhoff's insight:

 

This page provides a link to the Penguin Books website where the book, 'As I Grew Older' by Ian Abdulla, can be purchased.

 

Throughout the book, the author - Ian Abdulla - shares with readers the income-generating, service-producing systems employed by him and his family as he was growing up.  These include picking and selling grapes as the season rolled around annually, catching rats and selling the skins to make purses or handbags to buyers at Renmark in the Riverland, and setting a cross-line across the river to catch Murray Cod using yabbies as bait and selling the fish to buyers according to its weight.

 

In addition to service-producing systems, the book also touches upon systems used to produce goods; the first being the system of killing sheep in the sheds.  The author, as a young boy, would buy the sheep heads, take them home and skin them with a razor blade so that the heads could be put in the oven or boiled on the stove for eating.  Furthermore, after consuming the meat of the sheep head, the boys would play Cowboys and Indians using the leftover jawbone as a toy gun; a cheap way of producing another good.  Other systems used to produce goods, which are described in the book, are those of hunting as a family for swan eggs and testing the eggs to see if they would float - those that sank were edible.

 

I would use this resource in class as a reading lesson by having the students gather around to listen to the story and look at the descriptive illustrations.  I would then ask students to describe what they saw happening in the pictures.  Focusing on the pictures is supported by Harrison (2011, p. 191) who states that teachers should ask students what the distinguishing features of Aboriginal art are as a way of learning more about Indigenous art, and Indigenous culture in general.

 

Moreover, I would assign one of the service or good-producing systems used by the Indigenous people, mentioned in the book, to groups of students and have them draw pictures showing the steps of the system.  I would then hang the pictures around the room, and as a group, the students could describe to the class what is happening in the system.

 

References:

Harrison, N. (2011). Teaching And Learning In Aboriginal Education (2nd ed.). Melbourne, Victoria, Australia: Oxford University Press.

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Pak Yono's Paddy Field: Growing Rice in Indonesia

Pak Yono's Rice Paddy - Growing Rice in Indonesia, the book, views rice as a system, a cycle that is very much part of the daily lives of so many Indonesian people, and people all around the world.

 

Outcome:

SSS1.7 - Explain how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants.

Subject Matter:

1.  Interconnections between technologies, workers, users and the environment.

2.  Personal needs and wants.

3.  Systems for producing goods and services.

4.  Technology used for producing goods and services.

5.  Resources used by families and where they come from.

 

Link to e-book:

http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/resources/pak_yono_2013.pdf

Adam Steinhoff's insight:

 

This page contains a hyperlink to the e-book Pak Yono’s Paddy Field – Growing Rice in Indonesia as well as a PDF file, designed to accompany the book, titled ‘Teacher’s Background Information’.  The purpose of this page is to provide HSIE teachers with ideas on how to use 'Teacher's Background Information', a useful resource to accompany the teaching of Pak Yono’s Paddy Field – Growing Rice in Indonesia in their addressing of outcome SSS1.7.

 

In terms of teaching activities, I would use Pak Yono’s Paddy Field – Growing Rice in Indonesia as a whole-class reading exercise.  However, this process could be enhanced through the use of the accompanying booklet, ‘Teacher’s Background Information’.  The glossary section on the first page of this booklet could be used to pre-teach some vocabulary which, if not taught, may interfere with comprehension of the story.  I would pre-teach vocabulary by using pictures which relate to each word and asking the students to match the pictures with the words.

 

In addition to the glossary section, the major benefit of using this booklet as a teaching resource is that it lists possible questions for each page of the book, Pak Yono’s Paddy Field – Growing Rice in Indonesia, which I would ask students as they read along.  For the purpose of this page, teachers could choose questions which specifically relate to systems for producing goods and services.  Some possible examples include “Why does Pak Yono grow rice?”  What technology is used to assist the rice growing process?”  Page 2 – “What do you think the animal is doing?”  Page 6 – “Who helps Pak Yono in the rice field?” (Gore, 2003, p. 2).  Further examples include, page 29-31 – “List the different methods used for threshing the rice.”  “What are the plastic sheets on the ground used for?” (Gore, 2003, p. 4).

 

References:

Gore, J. (2003, August). Pak Yono's Paddy Field - Growing Rice in Indonesia: Teachers' Background Information. Booklet, 1-8. (J. Gore, Compiler) NSW, Australia: NSW Asia Access Program.

 

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Milk - From Cow to Shop

Milk - From Cow to Shop | Systems for Producing Goods & Services | Scoop.it

 

 

Adam Steinhoff's insight:

 

This site provides an informative video clip about the system behind getting milk from the cow to the supermarket refrigerator.

 

After getting some ideas from students about where they think milk comes from, I would show the students the video clip, once in full, and the second time stopping it at certain points along the way to show the steps being discussed in the clip.  During my stopping of the video, I would use the sentences in the chart (Steps Involved in Producing Milk) above.  Using information and communications technology (ICT) in the classroom is supported by Johnson & Gilbert (2014, p. 157) who claim that governments and the community alike are convinced that ICT offers great potential to enhance learning, and ensure learning is authentic to the needs of contemporary society.

 

After viewing the video clip, I would use the above chart as a template for a number of different activities.  Firstly, I would remove the 1st and 3rd columns and cut out the steps involved in the system of milk production.  Then, the steps could be stuck on the board in a jumbled fashion.  Then, I would call on individual students to come up and place a step somewhere in the chain, thus ordering the steps one by one into the correct sequence.  The steps could then be removed from the board and students, working in groups of 4, would be given the steps to put in order.  As a final comprehension check, I would give each student a step in the system of milk production and delivery and they would have to stand in a line (in the correct sequence of steps) with their classmates.  If I had a class of more than 10 students, I would create two groups of students, thus forming two lines.  This activity could be repeated numerous times by asking the students to swap the ‘step’ they were given with another student.

 

To draw a link between the system of milk production and delivery with other systems in society, I could also hold a short discussion eliciting ideas from students about other products that are produced using a system (e.g. bread, wheat, beer, cars, etc.)

 

Regarding possible assessment activities, I may do so by manipulating the numbers and letters columns of the table above so that students have to match the letters with the correct numbers so that 1 is the first step and 10 is the last step.  I may also add pictures next to the steps to better address the needs of all learners.

 

A numeracy component could be added to the lesson by asking students to listen out for 1) the number of litres of milk that the driver measures in the vat (3,275 litres) and 2) the number of litres of milk produced by a cow in a day (20 litres).

 

References: 

Johnson, N. F., & Gilbert, R. (2014). Using Information And Communication Technologies. In R. Gilbert, B. Hoepper, R. Gilbert, & B. Hoepper (Eds.), Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, geography, economics, and citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th ed., pp. 156-174). Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Goods and Services - Interactive Activities

Goods and Services - Interactive Activities | Systems for Producing Goods & Services | Scoop.it

This website is a fun, interactive way for students to begin learning about the differences between goods and services as well as needs and wants in relation to the following HSIE outcome:

SSS1.7 - Explain how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants.

Subject Matter:

1.  Personal needs and wants

2.  Systems for producing goods and services.

 

Needs & Wants: http://www.mcwdn.org/ECONOMICS/NeedWant.html

 

Adam Steinhoff's insight:

 

This site provides a platform for students to interact with the interface with the aim of expanding their knowledge relating to goods and services.  This website would be particularly effective as a resource in the early stages of my teaching outcome SSS1.7 - How people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants – as it clearly shows the differences between goods and services as well as needs and wants.

 

This lesson would be ideally performed using a Smartboard or Interactive White Board (IWB).  However, it could also be done with each student working individually or in pairs at a computer.  There are five interactive activities relevant to outcome SSS1.7.  The first - (1) -  can be found by clicking on the hyperlink ‘interactive activity’.  In this exercise, students are required to drag each service/product over the correct person/occupation.  The second and third activities - (2) and (3) - are drag and drop exercises whereby students are required to drag objects into the correct columns; either the goods or services column.  The next activity  - (4) - is an interactive quiz requiring students to answer multiple choice questions.  I would use this activity as a competition between two teams of students.  The final activity - (5) - is another drag and drop exercise whereby students drag the image on the left onto the image that they think it matches with on the right.

 

I would pre-teach the concept of goods and services and use these interactive exercises as a means of individual, pair, or whole-class practice.  Alternatively, I could divide the class into two teams and perform the activity as a competition.  Using this approach, I would call out a profession and the first student to raise their hand could come up to drag the good over the matching profession.  The interactive quiz (4) listed above could also be done as a competition whereby I would read out the question and ask students to raise their hand to guess the answer.  I would award points to teams who got the correct answer.

 

Finally, there is also a hyperlink above to a webpage showing a simple representation of the differences between needs and wants.  I would use this site to accompany early teaching relating to outcome SSS1.7.

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Snail Mail - How our Mail is Delivered

Snail Mail - How our Mail is Delivered | Systems for Producing Goods & Services | Scoop.it

Although means of communication have changed dramatically over the past few decades, the system of mail delivery still plays a crucial role in modern-day society.

 

Outcome:

SSS1.7 - Explain how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants.

Subject Matter:

1.  Interconnections between technologies, workers, users and the environment.

2.  Systems for producing goods and services.

Adam Steinhoff's insight:

 

This site could be used by stage 1 HSIE students to increase their awareness of service-providing systems within society.  The site contains an informative video clip about Australia Post outlining how mail is delivered around the country.

 

I would use the video clip, Snail Mail, to draw a link between mail - something which is part of students’ daily life – and the system responsible for the provision of mail.  Prior to viewing Snail Mail, I would ask students how many letters they think can be sorted every hour (35,000).  This touches briefly upon numeracy, specifically number sense.  I would then ask students to listen out for the answer and any other bits of information they hear.  After checking the students’ understanding of the video clip by questioning students, I would show students a simplistic flow chart of pictures outlining the sequence of steps shown in the video clip.  I would then ask students to create a similar piece of work on a piece of butcher’s paper with coloured pencils or crayons, in groups.

 

Extending the use of this video clip further, I would ask students to individually make a hand-made card for their parents, teaching them the process of completing an envelope with address details and a stamp.  Finally, I would take the class on a small excursion to the local post office or letter box to post their letters.  Students could then tell me when they received the letter, giving them an idea of how long it takes to receive a local letter.  Incorporating an authentic element to the HSIE curriculum is important and is supported by Tudball & Gordon (2014, p. 310) who claim that providing opportunities for students to authentically engage in community activities is desireable.

 

References:

Tudball, L., & Gordon, K. (2014). Teaching For Active And Informed Citizenship. In R. Gilbert, B. Hoepper, R. Gilbert, & B. Hoepper (Eds.), Teaching Humanities And Social Sciences: History, geography, economics and citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th ed., pp. 297-320). Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

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