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Could we plan our cities using Twitter? | The Guardian

Could we plan our cities using Twitter? | The Guardian | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it

Last year, the Urban Attitudes Lab was founded, dedicated to studying how “big data” can inform city planning and policy. Its director, Justin Hollander, and his team have been analysing Twitter for key words and sentiments about civic issues, in order to learn more about what people think about their cities, and how policy can respond.

“A lot of what I’m trying to uncover is, where are people happy? What makes them happy? This has the potential to revolutionise how local governments in particular plan for the future,” Hollander says in Next City. Whereas census data is produced every 10 years, tweets are produced every second – meaning they are a vital way of gathering up-to-date information on our cities. ....


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Apps don’t make a city smart - The Boston Globe

Apps don’t make a city smart - The Boston Globe | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it

Our current smart-city techno fetish rides roughshod across the public realm. It encourages the belief that there’s always “an app for that” — that we can address deep-seated, structural urban problems through business-led technological innovation and somehow sidestep the messiness of inclusive politics.


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To be truly smart, cities of the future should focus on developing democratic, participatory visions that harness smart technology to a shared agenda. Let’s create a genuinely shared urban commons and an inclusive public realm — not a place where quick adoption of smart technologies just reinforces the dominant-yet-dumb approaches of competition, enclosure, and division.


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A startup from Google's secretive moonshot lab is changing the way we build cities

A startup from Google's secretive moonshot lab is changing the way we build cities | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
In 2011, a handful of software engineers and architects working at Google X, the software giant's secretive "moonshot" lab, decided to figure out how t

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Will technology not only make our cities smarter, but more equal too?

Will technology not only make our cities smarter, but more equal too? | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
How technology is leading New York to become a smarter and more equitable city.

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1931: bienvenidos a la smart city

1931: bienvenidos a la smart city | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
@manufernandez - Understanding cities and urban policies, urban innovation, sustainable and human cities

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Nordic Cities Beyond Digital Disruption

Nordic Cities Beyond Digital Disruption | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
The stories of places like Songdo in South Korea or Masdar city in Abu Dhabi fit the classic Smart City mold: technologically highly advanced, newly built cities, planned in a top- down manner by leading architects and technology companies. This, however, is not the reality in which most of us urban-dwellers live: In 30 years’ time, the majority of urban dwellers will still live in neighbourhoods built in the 20th century. Yet the Smart City approach is the paradigm of urban development in the 2010s. Nordic Cities Beyond Digital Disruption…

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32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World

32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
Our world is a complex network of people, places and things. Here are 32 maps will teach you something new about our interconnected planet.

Via Seth Dixon
macellomedeiros's insight:

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

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StacyOstrom's curator insight, April 4, 9:18 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, April 4, 9:28 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

Lynne Stone's curator insight, August 30, 8:08 PM
Everything posted by Seth Dixon really contributes to our understanding to the world.
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One of these seven US cities will receive $50 million to rethink urban transport | The Verge

One of these seven US cities will receive $50 million to rethink urban transport | The Verge | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it

An aging population and increased urbanization are set to dramatically change America's transport needs, and the government wants to do something about it. In 2015, the Department of Transportation unveiled its Smart City challenge, a competition for mid-sized cities to their rethink urban transportation using technology like autonomous cars and smart street lights. This weekend at South by Southwest, the department announced the challenge's finalists, one of which will eventually receive a $40 million grant from the government and an additional $10 million in private funding. ...


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17 ways the Internet of Things can go horribly wrong

17 ways the Internet of Things can go horribly wrong | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
If the Internet is built into everything you own, none of it will be truly safe from hackers. - Page 10

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PhD. La smart city como imaginario socio-tecnológico

PhD. La smart city como imaginario socio-tecnológico | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
Tesis. La smart city como imaginario socio-tecnológico

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What's Yours Is Mine

What's Yours Is Mine | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
In What's Yours Is Mine, Tom Slee argues the "new" sharing economy is funded and steered by very old-school venture capitalists.

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The automated city: do we still need humans to run public services?

The automated city: do we still need humans to run public services? | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
From driverless buses to an AI council worker called Amelia, municipal services are becoming increasingly automated. But what does that mean for the future of our cities – and the jobs market?
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André Lemos's curator insight, September 20, 4:38 PM
“Smart cities” offer a seductive vision of a world where everything runs as smoothly as the latest iPhone. Need a parking space? An app will tell you where one’s available, and notify you (and your friendly neighbourhood parking inspector) when your time is up. It’s the kind of technology many cities are trialling, embedding sensors in streetlights, curbs and buildings to monitor parking, traffic and air pollution – even crime.
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The Dark Side of Data-Based Transportation Planning | CityLab

The Dark Side of Data-Based Transportation Planning | CityLab | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it

The quantitative data that’s available is far too limited, and likely to lead us to the wrong conclusions.  When it comes to transportation planning, we have copious data about some things, and almost nothing about others. Plus, there’s an evident systematic bias in favor of current modes of urban transportation and travel patterns. The car-centric data we have about transportation fundamentally warps the field’s decision-making. Unless we’re careful, over-reliance on big data will only perpetuate that problem—if not make it worse.


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Early experiments show a smart city plan should start with people first

Early experiments show a smart city plan should start with people first | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
Australia's Smart Cities Plan largely conveys a limited role for people: they live, work and consume. This neglects the rich body of work calling for better human engagement in smart cities.

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People Now Spend More Internet Time on Mobile Than Desktops or Laptops

People Now Spend More Internet Time on Mobile Than Desktops or Laptops | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it

The mobile revolution has arrived."


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Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, April 18, 11:32 AM

"The shift to mobile might finally be complete.

The amount of time people spend online on desktops might have peaked in 2015, according to new data from comScore.

 

Online time spent on desktops and laptops in the U.S. fell 6% year-over-year in March 2016, which indicates that desktop is finally truly giving way to mobile." . . .

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Only Smart Citizens can enable true Smart Cities

Only Smart Citizens can enable true Smart Cities | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
The logic of the city is based on chaos and diversity. Smart cities should have a bottom-up nature, initiated by the smart citizens.

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Smart cities : la carte des villes intelligentes en France

Smart cities : la carte des villes intelligentes en France | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
19 communes, métropoles et communautés d'agglomération françaises développent des services intelligents. Et les plus grandes sont loin d'être les seules à s'activer.

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Atlantis RH's curator insight, April 6, 3:19 AM

8 des 19 smart cities françaises ont moins de 250 000 habitants, soit près de la moitié d'entre elles.

 

Dans le détail, 68% des smart cities tricolores, soit 13 d'entre elles, se sont lancées dans l'open data, c'est-à-dire l'ouverture des données, sur les transports en commun disponibles en temps réel par exemple, aux entrepreneurs voire même aux citoyens.

 
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Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing

Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
Connecting Expertise to Government

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Miguel Acero's curator insight, March 17, 6:12 PM
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Technology & democracy: is there any hope?

Technology & democracy: is there any hope? | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
The presence of world famous publicist and Internet sceptic, Evgeny Morozov, was just one of the reasons why the Theatrum Anatonicum was filled to the brim last week. The European project D-Cent, Decentralised Citizens ENgagement Technologies, provided the audience with inspiring perspectives on the use of technology for societal and democratic goals. The event was truly at the core of Waag Society’s topics and beliefs.

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Television Engineer vs. Broadcast IT Engineer!

Television Engineer vs. Broadcast IT Engineer! | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
Much has changed in the Broadcast Arena. Analog to Digital, SD to HD, HD to 4k, 4k to 3d to VOD.  When I entered this industry the expected skills for a Television Engineer were : Soldering Lift 50

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Online whiteboard & online collaboration tool | RealtimeBoard

Online whiteboard & online collaboration tool | RealtimeBoard | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it

RealtimeBoard is an online collaboration software created as a team collaboration and online brainstorming tool. It's super easy to use & free!


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City Networks

City Networks | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
En la época digital, en ese mundo que se vive más de modo virtual que real, la ciudad se ha convertido en un espacio...

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El viejo sueño de la ciencia de las ciudades

El viejo sueño de la ciencia de las ciudades | Syntropic Cities | Scoop.it
@manufernandez - Understanding cities and urban policies, urban innovation, sustainable and human cities

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Manu Fernandez's curator insight, November 11, 2015 11:37 AM

“Despite the many-fold increases in computer speed and storage capacity ... there are some researchers who are convinced that it has been the hardware limitations that have obstructed progress and that advances in modeling are now possible because of larger computer capacity. There is no basis for this belief; bigger computers simply permit bigger mistakes.” (Lee, 1973)