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Synthetic Biology Market Analyzed

Synthetic Biology Market Analyzed | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
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ADMIN in FEATURED, MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES, TECHNOLOGY 

"Recent advances allowing for the better understanding of the ways in which living DNA creates the materials of life have opened remarkable new possibilities in materials science and chemical engineering. According to physicist Freeman Dyson, “The ability to design and create new forms of life marks a turning point in the history of our species and our planet.”

 These advances also mark an economic turning point, creating a market vision of synthetic biology life forms and life processes tailored to produce specific substances. The desired yield of such substances as biofuels can be measured in millions of tons, whereas pharmaceuticals can be measured in grams or milligrams. The door that is opening is likely to affect important markets for decades. Intense research and development continues to be both privately and publicly funded, but the work has emphatically moved out of the laboratory and into the marketplace. Major corporations are putting new intellectual properties to work in new factories in the U.S. and abroad. The players on this new field include new companies that come directly out of university research riding large holdings of intellectual property and established multinational giants that have the networks necessary to distribute and market the new materials. Between these two ends of the spectrum, companies are emerging that can intermediately supply the substances and services that bridge the gaps. The result is intricate patterns of interconnection between layers of the new supply chains. Acquisitions up and down these supply chains are frequent, as capital is freely available due to the obvious potential. This document examines 10 of the top companies in the field and discusses their positions in these complex patterns of supply and demand, as well as their investments and alliances. The chosen companies have effectively positioned themselves to connect the ends of the chain from the specialized tools and materials end or acquired the ability to make the most effective use of these tools and materials. This Research selected 10 companies that deserve recognition as leaders in the industry. Some are large established multinationals that have embraced the new technology. Others are startup pioneers that grow directly out of the research and development process. They are: Life TechnologiesDNA2.0OrigeneSynthetic GenomicsDuPontPfizerNovozymesAmrys BiotechnologiesScarab GenomicsBritish PetroleumAny top 10 list has subjective elements, and thus five other companies are profiled in less detail....."


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Synthetic biology meets bioprinting: enabling technologies for humans on Mars (and Earth)

"Human exploration off planet is severely limited by the cost of launching materials into space and by re-supply. Thus materials brought from Earth must be light, stable and reliable at destination. Using traditional approaches, a lunar or Mars base would require either transporting a hefty store of metals or heavy manufacturing equipment and construction materials for in situ extraction; both would severely limit any other mission objectives. Long-term human space presence requires periodic replenishment, adding a massive cost overhead. Even robotic missions often sacrifice science goals for heavy radiation and thermal protection. Biology has the potential to solve these problems because life can replicate and repair itself, and perform a wide variety of chemical reactions including making food, fuel and materials. Synthetic biology enhances and expands life's evolved repertoire. Using organisms as feedstock, additive manufacturing through bioprinting will make possible the dream of producing bespoke tools, food, smart fabrics and even replacement organs on demand. This new approach and the resulting novel products will enable human exploration and settlement on Mars, while providing new manufacturing approaches for life on Earth."

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Tools and Applications in Synthetic Biology

Advances in synthetic biology have enabled the engineering of cells with genetic circuits in order to program cells with new biological behavior, dynamic gene expression, and logic control. This cellular engineering progression offers an array of living sensors that can discriminate between cell states, produce a regulated dose of therapeutic biomolecules, and function in various delivery platforms. In this review, we highlight and summarize the tools and applications in bacterial and mammalian synthetic biology. The examples detailed in this review provide insight to further understand genetic circuits, how they are used to program cells with novel functions, and current methods to reliably interface this technology in vivo; thus paving the way for the design of promising novel therapeutic applications.
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New biorecognition molecules in biosensors for the detection of toxins

Biological and synthetic recognition elements are at the heart of the majority of modern bioreceptor assays. Traditionally, enzymes and antibodies have been integrated in the biosensor designs as a popular choice for the detection of toxin molecules. But since 1970s, alternative biological and synthetic binders have been emerged as a promising alternative to conventional biorecognition elements in detection systems for laboratory and field-based applications. Recent research has witnessed immense interest in the use of recombinant enzymatic methodologies and nanozymes to circumvent the drawbacks associated with natural enzymes. In the area of antibody production, technologies based on the modification of in vivo synthesized materials and in vitro approaches with development of “display “systems have been introduced in the recent years. Subsequently, molecularly-imprinted polymers and Peptide nucleic acid (PNAs) were developed as an attractive receptor with applications in the area of sample preparation and detection systems. In this article, we discuss all alternatives to conventional biomolecules employed in the detection of various toxin molecules We review recent developments in modified enzymes, nanozymes, nanobodies, aptamers, peptides, protein scaffolds and DNazymes. With the advent of nanostructures and new interface materials, these recognition elements will be major players in future biosensor development.
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From the Community: GeneMods August Newsreel | PLOS Synthetic Biology Community

From the Community: GeneMods August Newsreel | PLOS Synthetic Biology Community | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Synbio community news:

Steven Burgess steps down as managing editor at the PLOS SynBio Community. His parting review is typically excellent.
Great piece on Oxitec’s sterile mosquitos, and the human challenge of testing them in Key West.
NIH reconsiders its moratorium on human-animal chimera research.
A PBS article on using CRISPR in grapes turns into a remarkably comprehensive overview of the opportunities and challenges in editing agricultural plants.
Is NgAgo’s gene editing reproducible? Jury’s still out, but preliminary evidence isn’t good.
DARPA launches an Engineered Living Materials initiative, with the goal of designing biomaterials that grow into the shape of whatever structure/component. Open for proposals through September!
Interesting warning about over-hyping technology: a piece on embryonic stem cells and the challenges of treating disease with them.
If you’re in New York and want to build stuff with bio, you can now take a crash course in making custom biomaterials, put on by New York’s Genspace DIYbio lab.
If you find yourself in Cambridge, check out Cafe Synthetique, the local synbio salon. Sounds like a GeneMods sister organization!
Cool profile in STAT of David Baker and co.’s plans to solve problems in the world (mostly diseases, in this piece) with computationally designed proteins.
Highlights from the 2016 BioDesign Challenge (from last month, but good enough to post anyway).
Industry news:

Engineered Cas9 with lower off-target effects goes commercial: high-fidelity Cas9 variant from Joung lab licensed to Editas.
Total cost of CRISPR patent fight exceeds $20 million and counting.
DOD gives Ginkgo $2 million to develop probiotic vaccine for traveler’s diarrhea.
Books and Longreads

I just discovered BioCoder, a quarterly newsletter about synthetic biology from technology media company O’Reilly Media, and I’m really enjoying it.
Carl Zimmer gets his genome sequenced and analyzed by some of the best researchers in the field. A Game of Genomes chronicles his adventure. A must-read.
Ed Yong’s fantastic book about the microbes that precede, surround, live on, and comprise us, I Contain Multitudes, came out. I cannot recommend enough that you get your hands (or ears, it’s on Audible!) on this book.
Now, onto the research papers!

Protein engineering:

Easily and quickly sensing the presence of small molecules is one of the rate-limiting challenges in metabolic engineering. Now, Savage Lab reports rapid construction of metabolite biosensors using domain insertion profiling.
Baker Lab does it again, reporting rationally designed, two-component, 120 subunit, icosahedral protein complexes..
Electrochemical across membranes fundamentally underly pretty much all biological energy production. Fotiadis Lab has now engineered a photo-switchable, light-driven proton pump. 
Genetic circuits:

A Lu Lab collaboration programs yeast and builds a mini bioreactor to produce single doses of multiple biological therapeutics on command.
CRISPR/Gene Editing:

A Joung Lab collaboration relaxes Staphylococcus aureus Cas9’s PAM specificity, expanding the sites this smaller programmable nuclease can target. 
It’s been a bumper crop month for making molecular recordings in the genomes of cells. Science published three papers (summarized here): Church Lab reported molecular recordings produced using the actual CRISPR parts of CRISPR (as opposed to Cas9); Lu Lab used recombinases to build state machines in living cells; and a collaboration between Shendure and Schier Labs used Cas9 to record the differentiation and trace the lineage of all the cells in a zebrafish. Then, Lu Lab developed a method to continuously record the presence of Cas9 in human cells using a self-targeting guide RNA.
Metabolic Engineering

 Jewett Lab takes a step toward easier natural product mining by expressing non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and producing small-molecule peptides in a cell-free lysate system.
Building biology to understand it

A massively recoded, 57-codon E. coli? Not quite yet, but Church Lab computationally designs the genome, synthesizes the parts, and makes progress on assembling and testing them.
Venter Institute edits and interrogates bacterial ribosome genes, on a synthetic bacterial genome in yeast. GenomeWeb has a summary if you don’t have time to read the whole paper.
Review article in ACS SynBio argues that mammalian artificial chromosomes (MACs) are the way of the future.
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Principles of Systems Biology

Advances in biological engineering headline this month's Cell Systems call (Cell Systems 1, 307), alongside intriguing applications of modeling from the Elf, Goentoro, and Wolf groups. Check out our recent blogpost: http://crosstalk.cell.com/blog/a-call-for-papers-on-biological-engineering-and-synthetic-biology.
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iGEM RESEARCH ARTICLE: Development and Characterization of Fluorescent and Luminescent Biosensors for Estrogenic Activity | PLOS Collections

iGEM RESEARCH ARTICLE: Development and Characterization of Fluorescent and Luminescent Biosensors for Estrogenic Activity | PLOS Collections | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
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The first autonomous, entirely soft robot : Wyss Institute at Harvard

Powered by a chemical reaction controlled by microfluidics, the 3D-printed 'octobot' has no electronics

By Leah Burrows, SEAS Communications

(CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts) — A team of Harvard University researchers with expertise in 3D printing, mechanical engineering, and microfluidics has demonstrated the first autonomous, untethered, entirely soft robot. This small, 3D-printed robot — nicknamed the octobot — could pave the way for a new generation of completely soft, autonomous machines.
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Synthetic Biology Workshop with Columbia University's iGEM Team

Synthetic Biology Workshop with Columbia University's iGEM Team | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Eventbrite - ThinkSTEAM presents Synthetic Biology Workshop with Columbia University's iGEM Team - Saturday, October 1, 2016 at Lasker Biomedical Research Building, New York, NY. Find event and ticket information.
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Algae as vessels for (photo)synthetic biology by Konstantinos Vavitsas

Algae as vessels for (photo)synthetic biology by Konstantinos Vavitsas | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Algae (a term used to group many photosynthetic organisms into a rather heterologous mash-up) do not have a kind place in the public imagination. Take for example the following passage from Stephen King’s Pet Semetary:

“Dead fields under a November sky, scattered rose petals brown and turning up at the edges, empty pools scummed with algae, rot, decomposition, dust… “

Leaving aside their use in a horror novel as a way to set an image of decay, algae attract significant scientific attention, and are even considered cool (well, at least by some). But when I tell people I work on algal Synbio, one question that eventually comes up (or is silently implied) is why do I bother, when there are more prominent and better-developed systems? In this blog I will try to partly address this point of view, as well as provide a small perspective on the subject.

The practical benefits of algae for humans date back to the days of early photosynthesis, when they produced the oxygenic atmosphere we currently breathe. Moreover, algal forms were the ancestors of chloroplasts and land plants. Today, algae are found in almost every environment, in having various forms and ecological roles. But what is their place in synthetic biology?

In terms of algal synthetic biology and biotechnology, there are two main research domains: eukaryotic microalgae and cyanobacteria.

The model for studying eukaryotic microalgae is Chlamydomonas reinhardtii—although the use of more species is being explored. C. reinhardtii can be transformed both via nuclear and chloroplast transformation, each having different potentials (e.g. random insertion vs. homologous recombination, eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic translation and protein maturation, etc.)
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Synthetic Biology: Engineering a Chemical Switch into a Light-driven Proton Pump

Synthetic Biology: Engineering a Chemical Switch into a Light-driven Proton Pump | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Synthetic biology is an emerging and rapidly evolving engineering discipline.
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Synthetic Biology Platform for Sensing and Integrating Endogenous Transcriptional Inputs in Mammalian Cells

Synthetic Biology Platform for Sensing and Integrating Endogenous Transcriptional Inputs in Mammalian Cells | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
One of the goals of synthetic biology is to develop programmable artificial gene networks that can transduce multiple endogenous molecular cues to precisely control cell behavior. Realizing this vision requires interfacing natural molecular inputs with synthetic components that generate functional molecular outputs. Interfacing synthetic circuits with endogenous mammalian transcription factors has been particularly difficult. Here, we describe a systematic approach that enables integration and transduction of multiple mammalian transcription factor inputs by a synthetic network. The approach is facilitated by a proportional amplifier sensor based on synergistic positive autoregulation. The circuits efficiently transduce endogenous transcription factor levels into RNAi, transcriptional transactivation, and site-specific recombination. They also enable AND logic between pairs of arbitrary transcription factors. The results establish a framework for developing synthetic gene networks that interface with cellular processes through transcriptional regulators.
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Biocompute Lab

Biocompute Lab | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it

From individual cells deciding how to differentiate during development, to social insects intricately coordinating their actions when scavenging for food; the ability to perform complex computations and process information enables life.
The Biocompute Lab explores biology from this perspective, focusing on the molecular-scale mechanisms that individual cells and groups of cells use to perform such tasks. We apply tools and methods from the field of synthetic biology to create new living systems from the ground-up. By studying these artificial systems using novel techniques we are developing that exploit next-generation sequencing, microfluidics and computational modelling, we aim to better understand the rules governing how biological parts are best pieced together to perform useful computations. Understanding the computational architecture of cells opens new ways of reprogramming cells to tackle problems spanning the sustainable production of materials to novel therapeutics. It also provides key insights into how biology controls the complex processes and structures that sustain life.
The Biocompute Lab falls within BrisSynBio, a BBSRC/EPSRC Synthetic Biology Research Centre at the University of Bristol.
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Editorial overview: Microbial systems biology: systems biology prepares the ground for successful synthetic biology

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CRISPR Technologies for Bacterial Systems: Current Achievements and Future Directions

Throughout the decades of its history, the advances in bacteria-based bio-industries have coincided with great leaps in strain engineering technologies. Recently unveiled clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) systems are now revolutionizing biotechnology as well as biology. Diverse technologies have been derived from CRISPR/Cas systems in bacteria, yet the applications unfortunately have not been actively employed in bacteria as extensively as in eukaryotic organisms. A recent trend of engineering less explored strains in industrial microbiology-metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and other related disciplines-is demanding facile yet robust tools, and various CRISPR technologies have potential to cater to the demands. Here, we briefly review the science in CRISPR/Cas systems and the milestone inventions that enabled numerous CRISPR technologies. Next, we describe CRISPR/Cas-derived technologies for bacterial strain development, including genome editing and gene expression regulation applications. Then, other CRISPR technologies possessing great potential for industrial applications are described, including typing and tracking of bacterial strains, virome identification, vaccination of bacteria, and advanced antimicrobial approaches. For each application, we note our suggestions for additional improvements as well. In the same context, replication of CRISPR/Cas-based chromosome imaging technologies developed originally in eukaryotic systems is introduced with its potential impact on studying bacterial chromosomal dynamics. Also, the current patent status of CRISPR technologies is reviewed. Finally, we provide some insights to the future of CRISPR technologies for bacterial systems by proposing complementary techniques to be developed for the use of CRISPR technologies in even wider range of applications.
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Researchers succeed in developing a genome editing technique that does not cleave DNA

Researchers succeed in developing a genome editing technique that does not cleave DNA | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Researchers succeed in developing a genome editing technique that does not cleave DNA
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A Two-Layer Gene Circuit for Decoupling Cell Growth from Metabolite Production

We present a synthetic gene circuit for decoupling cell growth from metabolite production through autonomous regulation of enzymatic pathways by integrated modules that sense nutrient and substrate. The two-layer circuit allows Escherichia coli to selectively utilize target substrates in a mixed pool; channel metabolic resources to growth by delaying enzymatic conversion until nutrient depletion; and activate, terminate, and re-activate conversion upon substrate availability. We developed two versions of controller, both of which have glucose nutrient sensors but differ in their substrate-sensing modules. One controller is specific for hydroxycinnamic acid and the other for oleic acid. Our hydroxycinnamic acid controller lowered metabolic stress 2-fold and increased the growth rate 2-fold and productivity 5-fold, whereas our oleic acid controller lowered metabolic stress 2-fold and increased the growth rate 1.3-fold and productivity 2.4-fold. These results demonstrate the potential for engineering strategies that decouple growth and production to make bio-based production more economical and sustainable.
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What Have We Learned About Synthetic Promoter Construction? 

The molecular components of transcriptional regulation are modular. Transcription factors have domains for specific functions such as DNA binding, dimerization, and protein-protein interactions associated with transcriptional activation and repression. Similarly, promoters are modular. They consist of combinations of cis-acting elements that are the binding sites for transcription factors. It is this promoter architecture that largely determines the expression pattern of a gene. The modular nature of promoters is supported by the observation that many cis-acting elements retain their activities when they are taken out of their native promoter context and used as building blocks in synthetic promoters. We therefore have a large collection of cis-acting elements to use in building synthetic promoters and many minimal promoters upon which to build them. This review discusses what we have learned concerning how to use these building blocks to make synthetic promoters. It has become clear that we can increase the strength of a promoter by adding increasing numbers of cis-acting elements. However, it appears that there may be a sweet spot with regard to inducibility as promoters with increasing numbers of copies of an element often show increased background expression. Spacing between elements appears important because if elements are placed too close together activity is lost, presumably due to reduced transcription factor binding due to steric hindrance. In many cases, promoters that contain combinations of cis-acting elements show better expression characteristics than promoters that contain a single type of element. This may be because multiple transcription factor binding sites in the promoter places it at the end of multiple signal transduction pathways. Finally, some cis-acting elements form functional units with other elements and are inactive on their own. In such cases, the complete unit is required for function in a synthetic promoter. Taken together, we have learned much about how to construct synthetic promoters and this knowledge will be crucial in both designing promoters to drive transgenes and also as components of defined regulatory networks in synthetic biology.
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Hacking microbes

Hacking microbes | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Biology is the world’s greatest manufacturing platform, according to MIT spinout Ginkgo Bioworks.
The synthetic-biology startup is re-engineering yeast to act as tiny organic “factories” that produce chemicals for the flavor, fragrance, and food industries, with aims of making products more quickly, cheaply, and efficiently than traditional methods.
“We see biology as a transformative technology,” says Ginkgo co-founder Reshma Shetty PhD ’08, who co-invented the technology at MIT. “It is the most powerful and sophisticated manufacturing platform on the planet, able to self-assemble incredible structures at a scale that is far out of reach of the most cutting-edge human technology.”
Similar to how beer is brewed — where yeast eats sugars and creates alcohol and flavors through fermentation — Ginkgo’s “hacked” yeast eats fatty acids and produces desired chemicals that recreate certain scents and flavors during fermentation. Those chemicals can then be extracted and used in a number of different products.
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Growing plants on Mars?

Growing plants on Mars? | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
https://youtu.be/Mja2rBVEBn4 This video from Leiden University in the Netherlands says about itself: A Garden on Mars 22 August 2016 We are the Leiden iGEM 2016 team.
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Biofabrication: The New Revolution in Material Design 

Biofabrication: The New Revolution in Material Design  | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Biofabrication: The New Revolution in Material Design
https://t.co/9FMsdhTc7u https://t.co/AdYcDJxMlE
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Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication

PLoS One. 2016 Apr 6;11(4):e0152774. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0152774. eCollection 2016. Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
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ALEXANDRA DAISY GINSBERG

ALEXANDRA DAISY GINSBERG | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
A fascinating, visual look at the limits/potential of synthetic biology in nature https://t.co/C1e7JA9ITt great meeting u @alexandradaisy
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