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What are Darwinian Evolutionists to Make of Craig Venter? - Discovery Institute

What are Darwinian Evolutionists to Make of Craig Venter? - Discovery Institute | SynBio | Scoop.it
What are Darwinian Evolutionists to Make of Craig Venter?
Discovery Institute
Recently in this space, Casey Luskin wrote about a speech Dr. Venter gave in Seattle, in which the genetic engineering pioneer spoke of DNA as digital code.
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Biology's Brave New World

Biology's Brave New World | SynBio | Scoop.it
All the key barriers to the artificial synthesis of viruses and bacteria have been overcome, spawning a dizzying array of perils and promises. But as the scientific community forges ahead, the biosecurity establishment remains behind the curve.
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Turning biologists into programmers - Penn State News

Turning biologists into programmers - Penn State News | SynBio | Scoop.it
Turning biologists into programmers Penn State News This rapidly developing field, often referred to as synthetic biology, may one day allow biological engineers to design living systems just as reliably as engineers currently design and build...
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Venter’s New Digs | The Scientist Magazine®

Venter’s New Digs | The Scientist Magazine® | SynBio | Scoop.it
Genomics pioneer Craig Venter is building a new campus for his non-profit research institute right next to his alma mater in San Diego.
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When life gives you lemons…make renewable jet fuel

When life gives you lemons…make renewable jet fuel | SynBio | Scoop.it
And when life gives University of Queensland researcher Dr Claudia Vickers lemons, that's exactly what she does. We’ve already seen examples of modification
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Frontiers | Systems approaches for synthetic biology: a pathway toward mammalian design | Frontiers in Computational Physiology and Medicine

We review methods of understanding cellular interactions through computation in order to guide the synthetic design of mammalian cells for translational applications, such as regenerative medicine and cancer therapies.
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Glowing plants spark environmental debate - The Seattle Times

Glowing plants spark environmental debate - The Seattle Times | SynBio | Scoop.it
Glowing plants spark environmental debate
The Seattle Times
The Glowing Plant Project is at the forefront of an emerging field known as synthetic biology.
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Boosting Ethanol Production 50 Percent Kevin Bullis - MIT Technology Review

Boosting Ethanol Production 50 Percent Kevin Bullis - MIT Technology Review | SynBio | Scoop.it
Boosting Ethanol Production 50 Percent Kevin Bullis
MIT Technology Review
The UCLA work is a “promising advance in biofuels technology,” says Wade Robey, chief technology officer at the ethanol producer POET.
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First UK synthetic biology trade mission sets its sights on San Francisco - The BioIndustry Association

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Engineers invent programming language to build synthetic DNA

Engineers invent programming language to build synthetic DNA | SynBio | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed a programming language for chemistry that they hope will streamline efforts to design a network that can guide the behavior of chemical-reaction mixtures in the same way that embedded electronic controllers guide cars,...
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UCLA engineers develop new metabolic pathway to more efficiently convert sugars into biofuels / UCLA Newsroom

UCLA engineers develop new metabolic pathway to more efficiently convert sugars into biofuels / UCLA Newsroom | SynBio | Scoop.it
UCLA engineers develop new metabolic pathway to more efficiently convert sugars into biofuels / UCLA Newsroom (RT @idtdna: Engineers @UCLA develop new metabolic pathway to more efficiently convert sugars into biofuels
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Unilever to Buy Oil Derived From Algae From Solazyme

Unilever to Buy Oil Derived From Algae From Solazyme | SynBio | Scoop.it
Unilever plans to buy about three million gallons of the algae-produced oil as part of its aim to double the size of its business while reducing its environmental footprint.
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Mutant Bugs Could Aid Pest Control

Mutant Bugs Could Aid Pest Control | SynBio | Scoop.it
A biotechnology company fromhas genetically engineered a new olive tree fly that could stop their natural counterparts from ravaging olive trees in Spain.
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Genetically Engineered Yeast Yields More than Bread or Beer

Genetically Engineered Yeast Yields More than Bread or Beer | SynBio | Scoop.it
Recent production proves that genetically engineered yeast could create everything from vanilla to sweet wormwood.
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Scientists to Make Breakthrough in Printable Biotechnology - Tasnim News Agency

Scientists to Make Breakthrough in Printable Biotechnology - Tasnim News Agency | SynBio | Scoop.it
Tasnim News Agency Scientists to Make Breakthrough in Printable Biotechnology Tasnim News Agency TEHRAN (Tasnim) – A group of German researchers have embarked on a project known as the Molecular Interaction Engineering (MIE), which focuses on the...
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Biology is the new software (Wired UK)

Biology is the new software (Wired UK) | SynBio | Scoop.it
Autodesk makes applications to help designers model a 3D world. But as biotech advances, it has embarked on a new mission: build tools that let us control DNA itself
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In the Future, We'll Program Cells Like Computers

In the Future, We'll Program Cells Like Computers | SynBio | Scoop.it
Researchers are developing a method to program human cells to combat HIV, cancer, Alzheimer's—even aging (In the Future, We’ll Program Cells Like Computers http://t.co/GDY5OeHxbT #synbio #computational...
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Jan van Hest: ‘Synthetic biology and chemical biology develop common ground’

Jan van Hest: ‘Synthetic biology and chemical biology develop common ground’ | SynBio | Scoop.it
Synthetic biology rapidly becomes an important branch of science in the biobased economy.
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Wildlife: The Next Big Thing in Genetic Modification? - Care2.com

Wildlife: The Next Big Thing in Genetic Modification? - Care2.com | SynBio | Scoop.it
Wildlife: The Next Big Thing in Genetic Modification?
Care2.com
Scientists have been talking about how to save species from extinction and about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for a long time.
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A healthcare innovator's guide to must-know tech terms for the next decade of medicine

A healthcare innovator's guide to must-know tech terms for the next decade of medicine | SynBio | Scoop.it

Electronic medical records. DNA sequencing. Big data. These technology trends are changing the way medicine is practiced today — but what’s coming next?

 

From artificial intelligence to natural language to processing to MEMS, here are some technologies that will change the future of healthcare.

 

Artificial intelligence/algorithm medicine

Predictive analytics tools that use data to help healthcare administrators identify high-risk patients and make efficient decisions are already in place in many hospitals. Now companies are developing decision support tools for clinicians that compare an individual patient’s data to large amounts of historical outcomes data.

 

Internet of things

This concept takes remote patient monitoring to the next level, involving multiple connected devices that can coordinate with each other through a wireless network without human intervention. Sharp, who’s in charge of clinical informatics research at Cleveland Clinic, says hospitals have just scratched the surface of this with smart infusion pumps and RFID tagging. “There’s potential for a lot of these things to talk to each other and raise alerts when something is out of whack, and potentially even detect infections,” he said.

 

MEMS

Short for micro electro mechanical systems, MEMS involves the use of miniaturized sensors, actuators and electronics that are smaller than the thickness of a human hair. Such technology has already penetrated the research market, with speedier, more precise tools for biologists and chemists. Now companies like CardioMems and MicroCHIPS are working on commercial implantable devices that can transmit data outside of the body for clinical use. However, regulation remains a big question here.

 

Wearable medical devices

We’re not just talking about the fitness bands you wear around your wrist. We’re talking flexible electronics — lightweight, portable sensors that could be, for example, adhered to the skin to collect biometric data. Or swallowable (not technically wearable, but it’s the same idea) smart pills that let clinicians know when patients aren’t taking their medications. The hope is that these devices could help patients and clinicians manage chronic diseases.

 

Natural language processing

The medical scribe business is hot. But another way of easing the burden of collecting patient data – especially the kind that’s anecdotal – is also heating up. Some EHR vendors have embedded voice transcription technologies into their products, and more advanced products that give structure to unstructured data are on the way. Some say natural language processing could change the way we interact with healthcare data, the same way that Siri has changed the way people interact with their cellphones.

 

Medical tricorder

Nokia and XPRIZE are hunting for a medical tricorder, armed with $10 million as a reward, but this movement is much bigger than the contest. Sensors, mobile technology and at-home medicine meet in this concept, which calls for development of a portable screening device consumers could use to self-diagnose medical conditions a la Star Trek. Scanadu’s Scout is the most high-profile device under development, but there are dozens of teams across the world working toward this goal.

 

Precision medicine

From targeted cancer drugs to molecular diagnostics, advances in genome sequencing are driving precision medicine. It’s defined by Pfizer as “an approach to discovering and developing medicines and vaccines that deliver superior outcomes for patients, by integrating clinical and molecular information to understand the basis of disease.”

 

Some use precision medicine synonymously with personalized medicine. Others say it’s a better term that captures the idea of personalized medicine more clearly: Not as medical care that’s tailored to an individual but rather the ability to classify individuals into smaller populations that might be more susceptible to certain diseases or respond to drugs differently. This term has been slowly gaining steam since 2011.

 

Workflow automation

Time-consuming administrative tasks like medical billing, revenue cycle management and inventory management are prime targets for automating IT solutions. As more data becomes digital rather than paper-based, more opportunities open for innovation in this area to save time in hospitals and physician practices.

 


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Programming genetic code can lead to better designer genes

Programming genetic code can lead to better designer genes | SynBio | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, September 28, 2013 2:47 PM

by
Dan Ferber

"How rare ‘words’ in bacterial genes make the difference

Reprogramming bacteria to produce proteins for drugs, biofuels, and more, has long been part of the job for bioscientists, but for years they have struggled to get those bugs to follow orders. Those days may be over. It turns out that a hidden feature of the genetic code controls how much of the desired protein bacteria produce, a team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard reported in today’s online issue of Science. The findings could be a boon for biotechnologists, and help synthetic biologists reprogram bacteria to make new drugs and biological devices. By combining high-speed “next-generation” DNA sequencing and DNA synthesis technologies, Sriram Kosuri, a Wyss Institute staff scientist, George Church, a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute and professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, and Daniel Goodman, a Wyss Institute graduate research fellow, found that using more rare words, or codons, near the start of a gene removes roadblocks to protein production. “Now that we understand how rare codons control gene expression, we can better predict how to synthesize genes that make enzymes, drugs, or whatever you want to make in a cell,” Kosuri said.…"


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Global market for synthetic biology products to top £7 billion by 2016

Global market for synthetic biology products to top £7 billion by 2016 | SynBio | Scoop.it
- Synthetic biology can be hard to pin down. The field encompasses a vast array of research themes, from creating artificial life to..
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