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Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings

Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it

When I read about folklore and even when I hear ghost stories that are true ghost stories, I hear patterns in them that correspond a little with Jung's archetypes.  Carl Jung was an early psychologist who believed  in something called a collective unconscious.  He believed all people drew their thoughts from a similar source and this accounted for why people from every different culture had myths and stories that were very similar without ever having known each other. 

 

For example; most cultures have a dragon myth and a Cinderella story. He also believed we all had universal symbols that we use to interpret the world.  Jung's main archetypes included the Great Mother, the wise old man, the child, the beautiful woman, the devil, the trickster, the scarecrow, and the shadow. These archetypes symbolize core desires within us. I think many of the hauntings I've explored fall into similar archetypes as these and I'm going to break down and explain some of these hauntings....


Via Bonnie Bright
Megan Kopke's insight:

jung's archetypes in stories - ghost stories, fairy tales, etc. 

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Rescooped by Megan Kopke from Depth Psych
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Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings

Ghost Stories and Haunted Places: The Archetypes of Hauntings | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it

When I read about folklore and even when I hear ghost stories that are true ghost stories, I hear patterns in them that correspond a little with Jung's archetypes.  Carl Jung was an early psychologist who believed  in something called a collective unconscious.  He believed all people drew their thoughts from a similar source and this accounted for why people from every different culture had myths and stories that were very similar without ever having known each other. 

 

For example; most cultures have a dragon myth and a Cinderella story. He also believed we all had universal symbols that we use to interpret the world.  Jung's main archetypes included the Great Mother, the wise old man, the child, the beautiful woman, the devil, the trickster, the scarecrow, and the shadow. These archetypes symbolize core desires within us. I think many of the hauntings I've explored fall into similar archetypes as these and I'm going to break down and explain some of these hauntings....


Via Bonnie Bright
Megan Kopke's insight:

jung's archetypes in stories - ghost stories, fairy tales, etc. 

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Typographical Symbols and Their Surprising Origins

Typographical Symbols and Their Surprising Origins | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it

Since the arrival of the printing press in the middle of the fifteenth century, when Johannes Gutenberg’s invention ushered in the modern age, operators of the printing press the world over have had to use their creativity to put in writing what was on everyone’s lips. Clearly, the graphical representation of speech does not begin in 1450, but the meanings of the written symbols became much more fixed thanks to the industrial processes that allowed the mechanical reproduction of works. Thus, at the end of the fifteenth century, the Italian printer Aldo Pio Manuzio was the first to develop the use of the comma [,] to serve as an element of separation within a sentence. Previously, the symbol reserved for short breaks in the speech was the slash [/], but from Manuzio on, this symbol was relegated mainly to mathematical uses (currently, though, with the emergence of the Internet, the slash is enjoying a new era of splendor). Manuzio, who was the most prominent typographer and editor of his time, also imposed the use of the period to end sentences, as well as the modern form of the apostrophe and the written accent.

Other typographical symbols have an earlier origin, such is the case of the peculiar [&], better known as the ampersand. This symbol, whose form evolved from the calligraphy that gives it its Latin name et (it’s made up by the E and the T joined through cursive writing), was already in use two thousand years ago. At that time the custom was to represent the Latin conjunction in the form of a typographic ligature, hence the peculiar written flourish. Its most widespread modern name dates back to the first half of the nineteenth century, when it was part of the English alphabet (it was the twenty-seventh letter). The usual practice was to recite the alphabet and end with “X, Y, Z, and per se and,” which is to say: “X, Y, Z and, by itself, and.” By dint of babbled repetition, and per se and became, quite foreseeably, ampersand.

 


Via Charles Tiayon
Megan Kopke's insight:

how symbols were transformed to fit written lanuage, especially in print. 

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How and where imagination occurs in the human brain

How and where imagination occurs in the human brain | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it
Philosophers and scientists have long puzzled over where human imagination comes from. In other words, what makes humans able to create art, invent tools, think scientifically and perform other incredibly diverse behaviors?

 

The answer, Dartmouth researchers conclude in a new study, lies in a widespread neural network -- the brain's "mental workspace" -- that consciously manipulates images, symbols, ideas and theories and gives humans the laser-like mental focus needed to solve complex problems and come up with new ideas.

 

Their findings, titled "Network structure and dynamics of the mental workspace," appear the week of Sept. 16, 2013, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

 

"Our findings move us closer to understanding how the organization of our brains sets us apart from other species and provides such a rich internal playground for us to think freely and creatively," says lead author Alex Schlegel , a graduate student in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. "Understanding these differences will give us insight into where human creativity comes from and possibly allow us to recreate those same creative processes in machines."

 

Scholars theorize that human imagination requires a widespread neural network in the brain, but evidence for such a "mental workspace" has been difficult to produce with techniques that mainly study brain activity in isolation. Dartmouth researchers addressed the issue by asking: How does the brain allow us to manipulate mental imagery? For instance, imagining a bumblebee with the head of a bull, a seemingly effortless task but one that requires the brain to construct a totally new image and make it appear in our mind's eye.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Megan Kopke's insight:

our brain could be controlling images and symbols to produce "imagination" rather than something more arbitrary... we make vague contructs of images described to us that may not exsist outside of our imagination.  people with greater imaginations can form more symbols and images, or combine them more easily? 

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Did Stone Age cavemen talk to each other in symbols?

Did Stone Age cavemen talk to each other in symbols? | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it
Previously overlooked patterns in the cave art of southern France and Spain suggest man might have learned written communication 25,000 years earlier than we thought.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Megan Kopke's insight:

what is considered communication?  how has communication changed from pictographs to arbitrary words.  When does communication also become art, as is the case with cavemen paintings or pictographs, etc.  

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Rescooped by Megan Kopke from Exploring cultural identity through symbols
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SYMBOLS IN A SUITCASE

SYMBOLS IN A SUITCASE | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it

“Australia only became a nation in 1901, but over time has accrued many symbols to represent itself”. “Symbols are invariably inscribed with multiple meanings; people will interpret them in different and sometimes contradictory ways. These meanings are not fixed but can change over time. Symbols go in and out of fashion. Some endure, others fade away, and new symbols emerge”- from site.

 

The site: This site offers all the tools that a teacher needs in order to engage students and allow them to develop a deeper understanding of Australia’s Identity, and as a result meet the relating indicator. Titled ‘Symbols in a Suitcase’ – students interact with physcial objects that have given/ influenced Australia, and their current identity e.g. vegemite, a Holden car and the Australian flag. The page offers expert explanations of ten of Australia’s main symbols, a teacher can explore and use this content to enhance lessons. Further,there are links provided to pdfs or external pages which provide teachers with lesson plans that relate to the ‘symbols in the suitcase’. Note: A teacher can create a suitcase relevant to the age group of the students in their class. 

 

Learning experiences:

Literacy: In my opinion students are already engaged with this resource, however, to provide deeper understanding and engagement a teacher can use one of the links provided on the page e.g. http://www.nma.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0014/240170/symbols-activities.pdf; A class discussion occurs about how the symbols in the case may have developed and changed overtime, they then think deeply about what symbols they believe represent current Australia. In groups students create an advertisement via a poster for an overseas tourist market. The teacher assesses the successfulness of students learning by the level of understanding demonstrated by the students in their advertisement.

 

Literacy: As homework students select five symbols that represent themselves and write a short description about how they shape their identity, if possible students bring an item into class for the follow up lesson. Students present their symbols to the class  e.g. their football logo, a place they have visited etc. A question/answer session occurs between the teacher, the presenter and the students, where students begin to develop their intercultural understanding skills (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p.13). Through this discussion the teacher assesses all student understanding; i.e.  what a symbol is and how it has shaped their identity.

 

Reference:

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6. Sydney, Australia. Board of Studies NSW.

National Museum Australia. (No Date). Symbols in a Suitcase. Retrieved April 10,2013 from http://www.nma.gov.au/education-kids/classroom_learning/activities/symbols


Via Jenelle Gordon
Megan Kopke's insight:

the way students (and anyone else, really) can establish an identity for themselves, for their culture, their country, anything!  also, how symbols that define identities may be different depending on who is describing the identity... students may use different symbols to describe their country 

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Letter from the Archive: Vladimir Nabokov's 'Signs and Symbols ...

Letter from the Archive: Vladimir Nabokov's 'Signs and Symbols ... | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it
Nabokov's short story centers on an elderly couple's attempt to visit their son in a sanitarium.
Megan Kopke's insight:

about Nabokov's short story, which uses layers of symbols with the plot of the story to create an emotion, one of paranoia or mania, like one of the characters in the story.  How do symbols evoke emotion in a way words cannot?  Are symbols necessary in literature in order to evoke deeper emotions in the reader?

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(EN) - Dictionary of Symbols | symbols.com

(EN) - Dictionary of Symbols | symbols.com | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it

"Welcome to the World's Largets Online Encyclopedia of Western Signs and Ideograms.

 

Symbols.com contains more than 1,600 articles about 2,500 Western signs, arranged into 54 groups according to their graphic characteristics.

You can start exploring this world of symbols by several means:

 

• Use the Graphic Index to search for the meaning or history of a sign.

• Use the Word Index to find a sign with a certain meaning.

• Check out a random sign if you feel adventurous.

 

If you prefer the feel of paper, get the all-new book, which features everything you can find at Symbols.com plus an ..."


Via Stefano KaliFire
Megan Kopke's insight:

I WOULD LIKE TO OWN THIS PLEASE AND THANK YOU!!! encyclopedia (not dictionary!) of WESTERN symbols.... how many western symbols aren't actually only western symbols i wonder...

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10 Outdated Symbols to Exclude From Your Designs

10 Outdated Symbols to Exclude From Your Designs | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it
Megan Kopke's insight:

symbols can be outdated! that's a crazy thought that i never imagined before... they may be outdated in relevance, but what about meaning? 

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How to use icons and symbols to improve the clarity of your mind maps

How to use icons and symbols to improve the clarity of your mind maps | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it
Icons and symbols are small visual elements that you can attach to topics in your mind maps, which add meaning and context to them. These miniature images can be used to depict priority, types of activities, tasks, and types of information and ideas.

Via Baiba Svenca
Megan Kopke's insight:

the importance of icons and symbols in "mind maps" or outlines, webs, anything like that.  symbols can have a much broader meaning and definition, bringing ideas and memories up quicker than a vague word or phrase.

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Maria Claudia Londoño D's curator insight, January 5, 2013 6:40 AM

Useful tool for students and entrepreneurs!

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, January 8, 2013 2:54 PM

Chuck Frey discusses the role of icons and symbols in mind maps, gives tips how to use and how NOT to use them in your maps, shares websites for free icon download.

FPPT's curator insight, January 8, 2013 4:39 PM

Chuck Frey discusses the role of icons and symbols in mind maps, gives tips how to use and how NOT to use them in your maps, shares websites for free icon download.

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(EN) - Dictionary of Symbolism | umich.edu

(EN) - Dictionary of Symbolism | umich.edu | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it

"Dictionary of Symbolism originally constructed by Allison Protas, augmented and refined by Geoff Brown and Jamie Smith in 1997 and by Eric Jaffe in 2001.

 

This symbolism dictionary endeavors to provide some possible cultural significances of various symbols, and suggest ways in which those symbols may have been used in context. Most symbols are not code signals, like traffic lights, where red means stop and green means go, but part of a complex language in which green can mean jealousy or fertility or even both, depending on context. It is up to each of us to explore works of art sensitively, and decide for ourselves how the symbols in each work function. This website is offered as an aid in that enriching activity."


Via Stefano KaliFire
Megan Kopke's insight:

provides insights to different symbols - how they may be used individually, culturally, or how they were used in the past compared to the present.  

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Dream Guide - Dream Dictionary - Dream Interpretation - Text A Dream - Phone Psychic - Text Psychic

Dream Guide - Dream Dictionary - Dream Interpretation - Text A Dream - Phone Psychic - Text Psychic | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it
Dream interpretation Service. Dream Dictionary A to Z. Try Our Psychic Reading, Text A Dream, Text A psychic and Psychic Phone Services.
Megan Kopke's insight:

Dream interpretation is based on repeated images or symbols in a dream.  This website interprets dreams based on the images in the dream (for a small fee of  course) Does this seem authentic or gimmicky?  What is the connection between different people and dreams that all cultures experience?  Why are people so interested in interpreting their dreams, or having someone interpret their dreams?  What do people hope to find in these interpretations?  

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Recognize All These Symbols and Get a Prize | Visual.ly

Recognize All These Symbols and Get a Prize | Visual.ly | Symbols, HOW DO THEY WORK?! | Scoop.it
Can you recognize all these symbols? Congrats, you're awesome and also a huge nerd!
Megan Kopke's insight:

"popular" symbols from video games/movies/books that classify a certain type of person based on who has the knowledge to identify these symbols.  what might someone who cannot recognize these symbols think they represent? how does this classify someone as a "nerd", and what is the importance of these symbols to people who may be classified, or classify themselves, as nerds?

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