Sydney Heritage - The Harbour Bridge and The Rocks Area
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Sydney Heritage - The Harbour Bridge and The Rocks Area
This collection of websites provides resources for teaching HSIE Stage 2 in exploring Change and Continuity (CCS2.1 Describes events and actions related to the British colonisation of Australia and assesses changes and consequences) with a focus on Sydney's oldest district, the Rocks, and also including the more recent history of two of Australia's most famous landmarks situated in the area, the Harbour Bridge and the Opera House. In particular, students can use this web material to explore "the establishment of a British colony — aspects of life, significant people including Arthur Phillip, achievements, events and places"(p.55, point 2, HSIE K-6 Syllabus).
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Learning resources - Sydney Living Museums - Historic Houses Trust of NSW

Learning resources - Sydney Living Museums - Historic Houses Trust of NSW | Sydney Heritage - The Harbour Bridge and The Rocks Area | Scoop.it

"Sydney Living Museums, the public identity of the Historic Houses Trust of NSW, brings 12 major heritage sites alive through exhibitions, publications, events, and education."

 

 

This website contains a wealth of relevant material which is easily located and written in an accessible style for stage 2 students.  There are personality profiles from the First Fleet, including Captain Arthur Phillip, Bennelong and Elizabeth Macarthur, as well as descriptions of convict life, comparisons with the modern day, and an interactive resource about convicts.  As a production of Sydney Living Museums, it is a high quality resource, and would definitely complement a study of the history of the Rocks, and of the first settlement.  An ICT lesson could revolve around students working in groups to discover more about a particular personality or theme from the resource list, and to report back to the rest of the class about what they found out.  Students could be assessed on both HSIE and literacy outcomes, based their verbal presentation in the group, or by having them write a short profile of their topic.  Another useful lesson idea could be to have the class read the article on Bennelong, his kidnapping and “usefulness” to the British, and discuss the attitudes of early settlers towards the Aboriginal people and some of the consequences of their settlement and colonisation.  This could link well with a further study of the Sydney Opera House, as students could discuss the significance of the place housing one of our most revered and international architectural icons, and what the place represents to Australians in a contemporary context.

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Sorry Day and the Stolen Generations - australia.gov.au

Sorry Day and the Stolen Generations - australia.gov.au | Sydney Heritage - The Harbour Bridge and The Rocks Area | Scoop.it

In examining the history of the Rocks and its surrounds within the context of Australia’s colonial history, I felt that it was of crucial importance to include the landmark event of our first national Sorry Day on the 28th of May, 1998.  Over 250,000 Australians participated in the walk over the Sydney Harbour Bridge to recognise colonial injustices towards Aboriginies since 1788, and to promote greater intercultural understanding.  It is important for students to develop an understanding and sensitivity towards the continuing efforts of Australians to reconcile our colonial past, to rightfully address the injustices, and to understand the displacement that occurred during the British settlement and expansion, which began from the Rocks area.  This article, Sorry Day and the Stolen Genarations, from the website of the Australian Government, is quite detailed and full of terminology, names of people, organisations and concepts which may be brand new to stage 2 students, so a class reading of the relevant section on Sorry Day 1998, could be a good starting point.  The class could discuss the different ways in which Australians attempt to redress the injustices of the past, to acknowledge and make connections with Indigenous people and culture, (Acknowledgement of Country, NAIDOC week, Sorry Day are some with which they may be familiar).  Students could discuss the significance of the location(the Rocks was the original point of European settlement in 1788) for the walk, and the significance of “crossing a bridge” as a symbolic act. They could go on to discuss what this meant to Australians at the time, and the message they were trying to send to both Indigenous people and to the Australian Government, who refused to give an official apology.  This will link discussion to the official Apology to the Stolen Generations which happened in 2008.  In this way, students can begin to recognise these efforts of reconciliation are an ongoing process we undertake as a nation, continuous, but also marked by historical points in which we collectively recognise change.

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How plague almost demolished historic Sydney

How plague almost demolished historic Sydney | Sydney Heritage - The Harbour Bridge and The Rocks Area | Scoop.it
Sydney's oldest district is steeped in history - but the story behind its evolution is as rocky as the streets.

 

This Australian Geographic article provides an interesting historical perspective on the Rocks in relation to change and continuity.  It shows the differing perspectives of competing factions over the development of the area - certain groups sought to preserve the original buildings for their heritage and character as belonging to Australia’s first European settlement, while others, including the Government sought to change it, and make it “respectable”, with efforts to make a turn away from its convict origins.  Students could extract events and their dates from the text to create a timeline - this could be done as a class with the guidance of the teacher.  Students could formulate responses to explain the different positions of either side, whether for preserving heritage or for modernising. The class could even have a debate taking the positions of the different players across the timespan included in the article.  The images from the gallery attached could be used as a stimulus for student writing about the changes to the area’s character over time, or as a basis for an integration with visual arts, exploring the visual features of colonial architecture which the conservationists sought to preserve.

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Constructing Australia - The Bridge

Constructing Australia - The Bridge | Sydney Heritage - The Harbour Bridge and The Rocks Area | Scoop.it
Celebrating the 75th anniversary of one of Australia's most loved icons, The Bridge is the epic and definitive story of the building of Sydney Harbour Bridge and the vision of those who made it happen, despite their personal conflicts and political...

 

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is an emblem of Australia, and a great feat of engineering and design.  The website for the ABC’s documentary “The Bridge” is a valuable resource and lays out a history that is broad ranging but accessible, and appealing to young students with its rich illustrations and intricate historical detail.  The information is presented through several different forms -  chronological narrative and timeline, portraits of the central personalities, digital animations following over 100 years of different designs put forward for the bridge, image galleries and excerpts from the film.  This material could be valuably combined with the Australian Geographic article mentioned below, in the exploration of the changes in the layout and character of Sydney as it evolved, and some of the ways in which the changes in the physical features represented broader social and cultural changes felt by people at the time.

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Sydney Opera House - House History

Sydney Opera House - House History | Sydney Heritage - The Harbour Bridge and The Rocks Area | Scoop.it

"Sydney Opera House (1957 – 1973) is a masterpiece of late modern architecture."

 

The Sydney Opera House website contains an accurate and detailed history of the building, along with several educational resources that are designed to address HSIE outcomes in a class excursion to the building with follow up activities.   An excursion could involve both a trip to the Opera House, as well as some of the historical sites and museums in the Rocks.   It would be advisable to track down at the library, some large photographically illustrated books detailing the construction of the Harbour Bridge, and Opera House, as well as the development of the Rocks area over Sydney’s history, which would provide a valuable resource during a pre-excursion introduction lesson, to frame the major themes and issues that you wish to cover at the actual sites on the day. The Sydney Opera House provides a good focal point for global perspectives within this topic, as students can examine the international scale of the building, explore videos and written history to find out what it meant to Australians at the time of its completion in the 1970s, and how it still remains an amazing feat of architecture, recognised on a global scale(it was internationally heritage listed by UNESCO in 2007).  This resource can be used to explore the changes in national identity and consciousness which we have experienced over the course of our history since 1788, and how these meanings can be communicated in so many different ways, through the buildings that we create, the days which we nationally recognise, and the ways in which we view ourselves in relation to the rest of the world.

 

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