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Escape from Camp 14

Escape from Camp 14 | Swanson North Korea | Scoop.it
A New York Times bestseller, the shocking story of one of the few people born in a North Korean political prison to have escaped and surv...
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Escape from Camp 14 is a book that follows Shin In Geun, a North Korean prison camp survivor, through his life in a prison camp and his risky escape from the only place he knows. Shin witnessed a terrible world when he was a child. He was born in a place where he didn’t trust his mother, almost never saw his father and had to fight every day just to get enough food to survive. The story starts with describing the heartbreaking relationship Shin had with his mother. Shin didn’t love his mother, didn’t trust her and had to steal from her just to keep himself from starving. These struggles for Shin carry out for the whole length of the book, from the time in the camp where Shin fights to stay alive in the deadly conditions of the prison camp, to the point when Shin steps foot outside of North Korea and fights to stay alive in China. Camp 14 was a prison camp in North Korea that was one of the most secure and harsh prisons. Shin fought every day to survive in this camp because he faced dangers of armed guards, abuse from other prisoners or guards, shortage of food, and harsh manual labor. Shin starts his life as a devote prisoner who would snitch on anyone to get an extra grain of corn. Shin even turns in his own brother and mother for trying to escape from the camp and ends up watching them be executed. As time goes on he is betrayed by guards he had informed, teachers that he had attempted to help and the only person he trusted in his childhood, his class leader. Shin first hears about the outside world when he is in the underground prison because his mother and brother planned an attack, but from that time on he wonders about what else is in the world and eventually plans to find out. From here, he plans an escape with a fellow inmate. While escaping the other escapee is killed by the fence, which allows shin to survive the escape. Outside the fence, Shin finally makes it into China. In China he struggles to make a new life and he then has trouble surviving in a new culture in China, South Korea and eventually the U.S.A., but Shin overcomes these obstacles and works as a speaker to raise awareness for labor camps in North Korea. Escape from Camp 14 is a riveting book that follows Shin through his life and opens your eyes to the rest of the world around us.

 


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Pride of North Korea

Pride of North Korea | Swanson North Korea | Scoop.it
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This photo shows the joy and pride of North Korea, North Korean military. North Korea spends the majority of its money on the military (as the photo shows). This picture was taken during a North Korean military parade, where their military is put on display to show their power and greatness. At these parades North Koreans gather to watch in awe and their patriotism. This photo surprised me because of the discipline in these soldiers and that North Korea would send their military on a parade through their own streets.

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The North Korea we rarely see

The North Korea we rarely see | Swanson North Korea | Scoop.it
North Korean rockets blasting across the sky. Soldiers marching in high-step unison in Pyongyang parades. Broadcasts praising leader Kim Jong Un while putting down the United States as the country's mortal enemy.
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The article “The North Korea we rarely see” is an eye opener that discusses the poverty and struggling citizens of North Korea. North Korea’s people are barely able to survive in this dictator-controlled country. Most North Koreans are very poor and live in poverty. They struggle to stay alive every day because they don’t have enough food to live on. Instead of living a life of lavish and fortune like their government officials, but instead must search for food day after day just to stay alive. The article explains how people in North Korea have given up everything just to keep them from starving. In one case a person had to sell their home just to buy a bag of rice. The conditions in North Korea are surprising as the only part of North Korea that is allowed to be shown is the rich and elegant part of North Korea which is just the government buildings. North Korea’s majority is suffering from poverty and starvation and most people in the world are unaware that this problem is even occurring.

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Inside North Korea (Part 3/3)

The next stop on VICE's tour of North Korean propaganda was The People's Library, this place is weird and creepy - just like everywhere else in North Korea. ...
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Power consolidation inside North Korea

Power consolidation inside North Korea | Swanson North Korea | Scoop.it
Student Resources in Context
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The article, “Power Consolidation Inside North Korea”, is an article written by Jamie Crawford that discusses the government and totalitarianism political system that is ran by Kim Jung-Un and was ran by his father and grandfather. The article starts by explaining the North Korean government and background on Kim Jong-Il and Kim Jong-Un. Kim Jong-Il ran North Korea and kept it as a military first country. This means that the government of North Korea focused first on its military and spent enormous amounts of money in financing its military. While this was occurring most of the people who live in North Korea lived in poverty and struggled to find food on a daily basis. When Kim-Jong-Il died, he left his power and country to his son Kim Jong-Un. Kim Jong-Un kept Kim Jong-Il’s legacy going with the way he ran his country. Kim Jong-Un now still finances the military with the same amount of money and it shows that most of the money the government has it spent on its military. North Korea, controlled by by Kim Jong-Un, is a totalitarianism government that spends more time focusing on its military then worrying about the health of most of it s citizens.

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North Korea

North Korea | Swanson North Korea | Scoop.it
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North Korea is not a good place for tourism. If traveling to North Korea be aware that it is a totalitarianism government that can make you do whatever they want. Be on the lookout because North Koreans hate Americans and have kidnapped them before. Also,  planning your trip is very hard because you must to have special permission to be allowed to enter North Korea. Lastly, when you are finally in North Korea, you will see only what North Korea wants you too, which will include great statues of their leaders and fantastic buildings but you will not be able to travel alone or observe the country for yourself. Overall North Korea would get a 1/5 star rating in tourism because it does have some unique sights but in general it is an unsafe nation.

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Liberty in North Korea

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LiNK is an organization, set in California, which aims to help people in North Korea. LiNK stands for Liberty in North Korea and this name really explains what they stand for. This “team” of people rescues North Korean Refugees and helps teach these refugees to be able to live for themselves outside of North Korea. LiNK is able to do this by rescuing North Koreans that ran to China, from North Korea, in search of safety and away from the oppressive North Korean government. From here, the refugees hide in China where they have trouble surviving on their own and hiding from the Chinese government who sends these refugees back to North Korea. Here, LiNK steps in and is able to rescue some of these refugees and helps them cross over the Chinese border and into safety. After they are in safety, Link continues to aid these people by helping them empower their lives and thrive in a life of their own. LiNK raises money by donations to pay for these rescues and it costs $2,500 to rescue a single refugee. LiNK has a successful history by rescuing 188 refugees so far and raising $470,000 total. North Korean refugees need to be rescued and LiNK is a major contributor to aiding these needy people.

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Inside North Korea (Part 1/3)

Vice founder Shane Smith managed to get into North Korea after a year and half of trying and is witness to the craziness of this hermit nation. Crazy is actu...
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Inside North Korea is a film that showcases the country of North Korea. One of the main topics during this video is the government in North Korea. During the film they discuss the totalitarianism government and its leader. North Korea is a military state that is controlled by the dictator Kim Jong-Un. In the film, the narrator travels to North Korea and showcases what North Korea allows them to film. They show feasts, parades, great structures and statues and the rich citizens of the nation. These spectacular things are all allowed by the North Korean government to be shown. What is not allowed to be shown is the poverty and starvation. North Korea bans filming of labor camps or poorer towns in North Korea. These bans are just one of many other strict rules put on by the oppressive government in North Korea. North Korea is totalitarianism allows government that is out of control because the leaders abuse their citizens and them to live terrible lives.

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Inside North Korea (Part 2/3)

Shane visits the North Korean side of the De-militarized Zone (DMZ) and surprisingly finds that it's more relaxed than the South however the propaganda and i...
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The Cleanest Race

The Cleanest Race | Swanson North Korea | Scoop.it
Understanding North Korea through its propaganda What do the North Koreans really believe? How do they see themselves and the world aroun...
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"The Cleanest Race" is a good book to read after "The Escape from Camp 14". This is because, "The Cleanest Race " is set in North Korea just like "Escape from Camp 14". "The Cleanest Race" goes into detail about the lives of North Koreans and their different views on the world. This book discusses the North Korean propaganda and how North Koreans live their lives and the culture of their country. This would be interesting because it would give insight on the world Shin lived in and how he escaped.

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