Digital Sustainability
18.2K views | +2 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Henning Larsen Architects: Low-energy office building in Denmark

Henning Larsen Architects: Low-energy office building in Denmark | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

The new office building of Energinet.dk in Ballerup has achieved the lowest energy class possible by means of optimizing the design and geometry. The building has an annual energy consumption of only 47,7 kWh/m2. Incorporating solar panels, ground water cooling and heat pumps in the project would further reduce the annual energy consumption.

A flexible and easily comprehensible layout consists of three elements: meeting facilities on the ground floor, a uniting atrium and workstations on the top floor, which floats above the sloping landscape.

The atrium is identity-creating, open and active. A significant part of the environmental objective has been to ensure a high degree of flexibility. The open design as well as the light walls and simple, reusable elements will make it easy to change the interior layout in the future.


Visit the link to view more images of this low-energy design in Denmark...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Housing+ by C. F. Møller Architects: Zero-energy design

Housing+ by C. F. Møller Architects: Zero-energy design | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

C. F. Møller Architects have designed a proposal for the pilot-project Housing+, for 60 zero-energy housing units on the Aalborg Waterfront. The design adhered to stringent energy goals through a combination of architectural design and user-focused technical innovation.

The Housing+ concept sets the ambitious target of a zero-energy housing scheme, which also includes the tenant’s primary household energy consumption. The complex will thus be 100% relying on renewables.

Central to the concept is the use of integrated energy-design to generate the concept of tomorrow’s housing, producing more energy than it consumes. This is achieved by optimizing the inherent passive gains of the main volume, and shaping it to take advantage of the orientation and potential for active solar energy-collection.

 

Visit the link for more images and details on this contemporary, green design that incorporates solar, passive strategies, and on-site renewable energy.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: How Much Money Will Solar Panels Save?

Infographic: How Much Money Will Solar Panels Save? | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

Even as more affordable photovoltaics and government incentives for adopting renewable energy sources have made solar a financially attractive alternative in some areas, it can still be hard to find accurate, easy-to-understand information to help make the leap. The Solar Tool, developed by the Sustainable Design Lab at MIT and Boston-based design workshop MoDe Studio, aims to solve that problem for the city of Cambridge. Simply enter your address, and a comprehensive satellite map of Cambridge shows you how efficient your own

rooftop is for soaking up the sun’s rays, from excellent to poor, down to the square meter.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

LEED Gold: Facebook Prineville Data Center seeks to be the world's most energy efficient building of its type

LEED Gold: Facebook Prineville Data Center seeks to be the world's most energy efficient building of its type | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

When Facebook users post photos or status updates, data seemingly drifts into the “cloud,” which is actually a complex data center housing racks of servers using as much energy as a small town...

 

Defying this energy-draining typology, the Facebook Prineville Data Center in central Oregon has achieved LEED Gold status through advanced technologies, including an innovative mechanical equipment penthouse and evaporative cooling system, all while keeping data flowing and providing pleasant workspaces.

For Facebook, a company that prides itself on openness, the architects created a prominent building that harmonizes with its high desert landscape. The permeable yet secure perimeter is clad in warm-toned precast concrete panels, corrugated steel and layered glazing. “People spaces,” including conference rooms and workspaces, open onto an interior courtyard. In fact, every employee enjoys views and natural light from at least two directions.

 

To reach the status as one of the world’s most energy efficient data centers, not to mention rigorous LEED Gold requirements, the designers of the had to rethink every part of a data center’s building, mechanical, electrical, and computing systems and remove everything that didn’t directly benefit efficiency- learn more and view the complete gallery of images at ArchDaily...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Center for Solar Energy & Hydrogen Research in Stuttgart

Center for Solar Energy & Hydrogen Research in Stuttgart | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

The new research building in Stuttgart is designed on a grid for a highly flexible workplace that serves as a dynamic framework for ongoing research activities. The Center for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research comprises offices, laboratories, meeting and conference facilities.

“The grid structure of the research centre ensures a high degree of mobility and freedom to change and expand the building”, explains Design Director Louis Becker, Henning Larsen Architects. “The building has a rational design and is organised in modules. 

Carefully integrated into the surrounding context, the building features various heights that relate to the city and adjacent buildings. The building will create a new, distinctive entrance to Stuttgarter Engineering Park and provide an insight into the ongoing research.

 

Read the complete article for details on the sustainable strategies and technologies utilzied in the design of this flexible, adaptable and green research building...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Sustainable Modernism: House in Regensburg

Sustainable Modernism: House in Regensburg | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

Building a green home, while increasingly popular in recent years, isn't a completely new concept, and the House in Regensburg by Thomas Herzog, built in 1977, still resonates today as a unique and beautiful example of thoughtful, site-responsive architecture.


Elegant in its simplicity, the design employs key sustainable principles, including passive heating and cooling, appropriate material selection and responsive building form, all of which enable the structure to have minimal development impact while maintaining a high degree of efficiency- the result of an integrated approach to site, technology, and design.

Herzog's House in Regensburg is not only a beautiful example of modern design, but also a testament to the fact that creativity is not compromised by sustainability. In fact, creativity is enhanced by this type of contextual and innovative thinking, making for a project that is not only green, but timeless and visually engaging, in both concept and execution.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Jonathan Belisle's comment, September 28, 2012 3:23 PM
I really like this article. !