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Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from The Architecture of the City
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Urban Regeneration in Sweden: H+ by Erik Giudice Architects

Urban Regeneration in Sweden: H+ by Erik Giudice Architects | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

 

The H+ project is one of Sweden’s must ambitious planning and urban renewal projects.

The ongoing process aims to radically transform the southern parts of Helsingborg connecting them to the sea through the “Blue-green connection”, a landscaped water feature. The central core of the H+ project is located around the Bredgatan area, a former industrial sector.

Located between the old city and the harbor, this area will be one of the first to undergo transformation and currently lacks housing, public services and has a poor public spaces. The aim is to transform the area into a mixed urban fabric, keeping the spirit of entrepreneurship and enhancing the collaboration between university and companies.

The varying width and depth of the central promenade gives ever new perspectives. Variation in scale and building typologies, mixing old and new, creates a dynamic urban fabric with a combination of intimate and more spectacular public spaces. Along the canal ground floors are used for education, café, restaurants, and office.

 

See more images and read about this ambitious and innovative urban regeneration and redevelopment project at the full article on the project.


Via Lauren Moss, association concert urbain
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Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from green streets
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Sustainable Urbanism: a high-density, car-free vertical city in Chengdu, China

Sustainable Urbanism: a high-density, car-free vertical city in Chengdu, China | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it
Work is about to start on a high-density, car-free "satellite city" for 80,000 people close to Chengdu in China.

 

Designed by Chicago firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, the 1.3 square km 'Great City' will feature a high-rise core surrounded by a buffer landscape of open space (60% of the total area). Residents will be able to walk from the city center to its edge in just 10 minutes.

“The design is attempting to address some of the most pressing urban issues of our time,” said architect Gordon Gill. “We’ve designed this project as a dense vertical city that acknowledges and in fact embraces the surrounding landscape.”

“The sustainability framework for Great City, custom-designed based on the principles of LEED-ND and BREEAM, follows an integrated approach toward meeting the overall objectives of environmental, economic and social sustainability,” notes Peter J. Kindel, AIA, ASLA, AS+GG’s Director of Urban Design. “Great City will incorporate innovative technologies and infrastructure systems to achieve 48% energy savings of a conventional urban development.”

 

The architects also note that the city will use 48% less energy and 58% less water than conventional developments of this size, producing 89% less landfill waste and generating 60% less carbon dioxide...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from green streets
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Smart Cities and the Smart Grid

Smart Cities and the Smart Grid | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

Smart Cities and the Smart Grid: There are natural parallels between the Smart Grid and smart cities in terms of concepts and deployments, though cities have much more experience at evolution than the traditional electrical grid. After all, they have been adopting new technologies that disrupt the status quo for centuries. The Romans created aqueducts and fundamentally changed how water could be controlled and distributed in cities. Discoveries in hygiene and disease transmission and control allowed people to healthily live in population densities with minimized odds of large scale epidemics. And then automobiles exerted their influences on cities. In each case, city systems, policies, and people changed to accommodate new technologies, new knowledge and new practices.

 

Now, ambitious goals such as zero net energy buildings will change the relationships that physical structures have within cities, and in turn change the relationships that occupants (full or part-time) have within buildings and within cities.

 


Via Joan Tarruell, Stephane Bilodeau, Lauren Moss
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Seren's curator insight, August 26, 2013 5:09 PM

An article drawig parallels between ancient city grids and their evolution into the modern age.

Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from green streets
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Will Smart Technologies Shape Future Highways?

Will Smart Technologies Shape Future Highways? | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

With the proliferation of mobile electronic technologies, interactive displays have begun to appear more frequently in fixed contexts such as smart rooms and media-driven building facades.


The latest focus of smart surface research is on the most connective element of the constructed environment: the road.

 

At the recent Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven, Studio Roosegaarde announced a joint effort with Heijmans Infrastructure to create the Smart Highway. This proposal for an electronically-enhanced road system fuses disparate elements of existing road infrastructure. Lighting, signage, and the roadbed are now a singular, integrated system.

The Digital Interactive Roadway designed by BIG for the Audi Urban Future exhibition in 2011 proposes a similar roadbed enhancement. The surface of the DIR incorporates strips of LED lights and a distributed network of sensors that respond directly to changing automotive and pedestrian traffic.

 

Visit the link to learn more about these forward-thinking projects and the potential for innovative digital technologies to shape roads and infrastructure...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from Renew Cities: Economic Prosperity
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UN-HABITAT's State of the World's Cities 2012/2013 Report

UN-HABITAT's State of the World's Cities 2012/2013 Report | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

"The City is the Home of Prosperity. It is the place where human beings find satisfaction of basic needs and access to essential public goods. The city is also where ambitions, aspirations and other material and immaterial aspects of life are realized, providing contentment and happiness. It is a locus at which the prospects of prosperity and individual and collective well-being can be increased.


What this new edition of State of the World's Cities shows is that prosperity for all has been compromised by a narrow focus on economic growth. UN-Habitat suggests a fresh approach to prosperity beyond the solely economic emphasis, including other vital dimensions such as quality of life, adequate infrastructures, equity and environmental sustainability. The Report proposes a new tool – the City Prosperity Index – together with a conceptual matrix, the Wheel of Prosperity, both of which are meant to assist decision makers to design clear policy interventions.


The Report advocates for the need of cities to enhance the public realm, expand public goods and consolidate rights to the 'commons' for all as a way to expand prosperity. This comes in response to the observed trend of enclosing or restricting these goods and commons in enclaves of prosperity, or depleting them through unsustainable use."


Via Renew Cities
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Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from URBANmedias
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Visions of Sixth Street - plans for a new, pedestrian-friendly bridge in Los Angeles

Visions of Sixth Street - plans for a new, pedestrian-friendly bridge in Los Angeles | Digital Sustainability | Scoop.it

Three finalists present plans for major new bridge in Los Angeles:

The groups—headed by HNTB, AECOM, and Parsons Brinckerhoff— have all been shortlisted to create the city’s new Sixth Street Viaduct. Their vivid public presentations were the first glimpse of what will likely be LA’s next major icon.

The original 3,500-foot-long structure, a famous rounded Art Deco span designed in 1932, has been deemed unsalvageable due to irreversible decay, and in April the city’s Bureau of Engineering called for a competition to design a new, $400 million, cable stayed structure.

Following the city’s lead, all three teams presented plans that not only showcased memorable forms, but embraced people-friendly designs, including pedestrian paths, parks, and connections to the river below. The push reveals Los Angeles’s focus on attracting people and talent through increased livability. Such moves are a welcome, if uphill battle considering that so much of the city has been designed for cars, not people...


Via Lauren Moss, Gerry B, association concert urbain
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