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New York City MegaCities 720p Documentary & Life Discovery HD

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Farms in the sky: a new solution to keep our cities well fed - ScienceAlert

Farms in the sky: a new solution to keep our cities well fed - ScienceAlert | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
Farms in the sky: a new solution to keep our cities well fed
ScienceAlert
... air and relaxation within their busy urban life,” explain their creators in their project abstract. Suddenly the future of megacities doesn't look so bleak!
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Between the Poles: UN projects 35 megacities by 2025

Between the Poles: UN projects 35 megacities by 2025 | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
By 2025 the UN projects there will be 35 megacities (10m+) in comparison to 22 in 2011. Population growth of the top 15 megacities millions, 2001 to 2025 (projection) Tokyo 37m 39m (+5%) New Delhi 23m 33m (+42%) Shanghai 20m...
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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:25 PM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:11 AM

mega cities Jakarta

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:53 AM

Megacities are beginning to populate the entire globe. In the developing world, more and more megacities are beginning to form. Jakarta Indonesia is an example of a rising megacity. This rapid urbanization has placed a special burden on the resources and local economies of many developing nations. This areas are not prepared to deal with the rapid population growth associated with the development of a megacity. This strain placed on the local areas, will often lead to terrible living conditions for the lower classes of society. Sanitation will often become a major issue in many of these megacities. Large portions of the population will often lack a proper sanitation system. The lack of proper sanitation will lead to the onset of deadly diseases. The effects of rapid urbanization can be deadly, for those living in the pooper regions of society.

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


Via Seth Dixon, Sharon McLean
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 7:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 5:58 PM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

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The Insane Growth Of China’s And India’s Megacities Mapped Through Satellite Imagery

The Insane Growth Of China’s And India’s Megacities Mapped Through Satellite Imagery | sustaining communities | Scoop.it

These charts--made with information from weather satellites scanning the ground--show how wide and how tall cities around the world have grown. What’s happening to the size of cities in Asia will blow your mind.

 

Faced with the incomprehensible scale of worldwide mega-urbanization, observers have alternately fallen back on sheer numbers or city comparisons to drive home the speed at which cities in the developing world are growing. For example, New York University’s Shlomo “Solly” Angel projects the world’s urban population will double in 40 years, while urban land cover--including everything from skyscrapers to slums--will triple in size during that span. Grasping to put such numbers into context, the McKinsey Global Institute estimates China will build the equivalent of New York every other year for 20 years, while India needs to add the equivalent of a Chicago to its building stock annually.

 

The mind reels, but such comparisons tell us little about the truth on the ground--is the urban future of India more likely to look like Chicago or Dharavi (Mumbai’s famous slum) or something else completely? A satellite designed to measure ocean winds offers us a clue.


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Shaping Smart Cities of the Future

Shaping Smart Cities of the Future | sustaining communities | Scoop.it

As part of a more interconnected world, our cities are playing an increasingly active role in the global economy. According to the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), just 100 cities currently account for 30 percent of the world's economy. New York City and London, together, represent 40 percent of the global market capitalisation. In 2025, 600 cities are projected to generate 58 percent of the global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and accommodate 25 percent of the world’s population. The MGI also expects that 136 new cities, driven by faster growth in GDP per capita, will make it into the top 600 by 2025, all from the developing world, 100 of them from China alone. The 21st century appears more likely to be dominated by these global cities, which will become the magnets of economy and engines of globalisation.

 

More ... https://www.box.net/s/vgepkuhletx96u1s34my

 


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Unicef Urban Population Map

Unicef Urban Population Map | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
An Urban World: UNICEF's new data visualization of urban population growth over the next 40 years.

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Crystal Waters Eco-Village, south-east Queensland, Australia crystalwaters.org.au

Crystal Waters Eco-Village, south-east Queensland, Australia crystalwaters.org.au | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
crystalwaters.org.au Crystal Waters is a rural Eco-Village in Queensland, Australia. Set in 650 acres of bushland at the headwaters of the Mary River, only 26kms from Maleny.

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:12 PM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:40 PM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 2014 11:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

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2050: What if cities ruled the world?

2050: What if cities ruled the world? | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
Imagine it is 40 years in the future. Government has been decentralized to the city level. Connections between cities consolidate into mega-corridors, which span national and state borders.
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Why Tall Buildings Make Cities Hotter - Gizmodo

Why Tall Buildings Make Cities Hotter - Gizmodo | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
The breezy dark corridors between a city's tallest buildings seem like shady respites from the blistering summer sun. But it turns out those shadowy urban canyons are actually making your city more hell-like.
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Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World

Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World | sustaining communities | Scoop.it

"In the above poster the cities are arranged (roughly, in order to maximize space) by population. Clearly, size and population are not directly correlated. Some cities take up a lot more space for a smaller population. The relationship between the two, of course, is known as density (population density, urban density)."


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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:21 PM

Urban sprawl is a rising problem in the world due to the lack of control and its massive impact on the surrounding environment. These footprints show how unique each city's sprawl is. The surrounding environment is playing a huge role in where and how far each city extends. Chicago, for example, is limited on its eastern side due to Lake Erie's close proximity, and Cleveland is in a similar situation but on its north side where Lake Erie is. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:35 PM

The cities are organized (approximately) to population and shows the size of cities accordingly. The different sizes of cities and their correlating populations is thus revealed from urban places around the world. 

Urban regions stay rather functional and could be seem similar across the board, focusing on major economic activity and transportation.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:17 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

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Delhi world's second most populous mega-city - Times of India

Delhi world's second most populous mega-city - Times of India | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
Delhi world's second most populous mega-city Times of India MUMBAI: The urban agglomerations of Mumbai and Delhi, which barely matched up to global cities in size in 1950, are now counted among the seven most populous mega-cities in the world,...

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Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:34 PM

TAlks of Mega Cities as over 10 milion rather than 8 and refers to move of mega cities into developing world as distinct from developed world.

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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

 

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 

 

Tags: urban, megacities.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:36 PM

World cities and megacities - Presently , the mega cities of the world have to have a population of at least 10,000. Many cities are very near the minimum to be considered a mega city, but are not quite there. By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, is estimated to be home to 29 megacities.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Megacities pose serious health challenge

Megacities pose serious health challenge | sustaining communities | Scoop.it

Rapid urbanization will take a heavy toll on public health if city planning and development do not incorporate measures to tackle air pollution, warns a report launched in Beijing last month.

The report1, compiled by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in Geneva, Switzerland, and the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) project in Boulder, Colorado, was launched as part of the IGAC Open Science Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry in the Anthropocene. A striking point in the report, says Liisa Jalkanen, head of the WMO’s Atmospheric Environment Research Division, is how quickly megacities — metropolitan areas with populations of more than 10 million — are rising in developing countries.

There are now 23 megacities in the world, compared with just two 60 years ago. Just over half of the population currently dwells in cities, and with the urban population expected to nearly double by 2050, that proportion is projected to approach 70%. “Almost all this growth will take place in the developing world,” says Jalkanen.


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Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:44 PM

Megacities in general - not a specific one.

 

Max Minard's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:21 PM

This article highlights major health issues that result from the increase in mega cities. Resulting form rapid urbanization, mega cities continue to grow and pose issues such as an increase in pollution. As the article states, "there are now 23 mega cities in the world." and "just over half of the population currently dwells in cities." Nations such as China and Japan have already experienced large amounts of urbanization and are currently struggling in tackling the increasing rates of air pollution. I personally think city planners and developments need to focus on controlling this issue along with researchers coming up with a less toxic renewable resource to use for energy. 

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Putting money where it matters: why Australian aid needs to be in urban areas

Putting money where it matters: why Australian aid needs to be in urban areas | sustaining communities | Scoop.it
The Australian aid program is a multi-million dollar enterprise.

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Costa takes on urban sprawl

Costa takes on urban sprawl | sustaining communities | Scoop.it

THE increasing pace of urban housing eating into valuable farmland areas in the Sydney Basin has prompted a public forum at Penrith this week to be chaired by SBS television's popular wild man of food production, Costa Georgiadis.


Speakers at the question and answer program will include NSW Farmers Association president, Fiona Simson, and director of the University of Western Sydney's Urban Research Centre, Professor Phil O'Neill.

 

The NSW Government estimates the Sydney region's farm sector is currently worth about $630 million annually in production alone, including more than 90 per cent of the State's Asian vegetable crop.

 

The Penrith meeting, which is being promoted with the tagline "You can't eat your house - development threatens the food bowl", will be at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre between 7.30pm and 9pm, organised as part of this year's Sydney International Food Festival.

 

Other speakers include agricultural planner, Ian Sinclair, and Western Sydney Organisation of Councils president, Alison McLaren.

 

Symposium organisers point out that with the State Government now flagging more massive new commercial and urban development around Riverstone and ongoing growth in the Penrith, Rouse Hill, Camden and Hawkesbury areas, more houses on Sydney's fertile flood plains represent a big dilemma


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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | sustaining communities | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Roman M's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 12:49 PM

I saw the pictures. It is amazing how peoples back yards are all different. From water to dirt to garbage to no back yards at all. I was commenting on the fact with the population growth there is only one way to build and that is up. Then i saw the pictures of the High risers and how tall they were and so close together. It is a no wonder people live in a stressful environment. There is nothing like living in a wide open land lot with grass in Wyoming or Montana but that sure will change in the next 50 years.

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Urban Agriculture

Urban Agriculture | sustaining communities | Scoop.it

"Aerial photo tour across countries and continents with a French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand"


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:10 PM

In a time where more people are moving away from their rural roots to try and make it big in the city, I think it's becoming more and more important that we focus on how to utilize our urban surroundings in a beneficial way. These photos are proof that it is possible, and I believe that cities in the United States should be more open to urban farming. It could be a way to not only take pressure off of families in cities trying to feed their children, but will also educate all sorts of people on where food comes from, and the importance of the environment. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:16 PM

Urban agriculture is a reality in third world countries. In Dominican Republic almost everyone in the country side have its own land to plant necessary food and fruits. The most popular is plantain and fruit is orange.

In urban areas is rare to see this, so is surprising to see how central Asians are doing it.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:58 PM

I love Yann Arthus-Bertrand's photography; so many of them are geography lessons in and of themselves as he captures compelling images of the cultural landscape.  This particular gallery shows 32 stunning images including this one above showing urban agriculture in Geneva, Switzerland.    


"Worldwide, there are 800 million amateur farmers in built-up areas. In estates in south eastern Asia and some towns in central and South America, many people depend on this activity for survival. It’s the same story in Europe; in Berlin there are more than 80,000 urban farmers, and in Russia more than 72% of all urban homes till their own patch of land, balcony or even roof. Urban agriculture is on the [rise] and there could be twice as many people enjoying it within twenty years."

 

Tags: agriculture, foodlandscape, images, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.