Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature
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The era of energy dinosaurs is coming to an end

The era of energy dinosaurs is coming to an end | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
The big, slow-moving dinosaurs of the energy world face increasing competition from a swarm of smaller, fast-moving mammals. Energy companies will update their strategies for a changing world, or t...

Via Valar Mathi
Michael John Carter's insight:

Interesting the move from the "Old Energy to the Newer One"

 

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Valar Mathi's curator insight, March 6, 2013 12:47 PM

"But a shifting environment means increasingly replacing dinosaur heuristics with mammal heuristics: efficiency, flexibility, responsiveness, open data, transparency, coalitions."

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3 ways cities can overcome barriers to energy efficiency

3 ways cities can overcome barriers to energy efficiency | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
Fixing outdated building codes is just the start of saving energy in urban areas.
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Here’s How Electric Cars Will Cause the Next Oil Crisis

Here’s How Electric Cars Will Cause the Next Oil Crisis | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
A shift is under way that will lead to widespread adoption of EVs in the next decade.
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Michael John Carter's curator insight, June 15, 2:55 PM
Another disruptive technology
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Verbatim's Mirageball Classic LED retrofit lamps deliver uniform, shadow-free light distribution

Verbatim's Mirageball Classic LED retrofit lamps deliver uniform, shadow-free light distribution | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
London, UK – Using Mitsubishi Chemical’s proprietary Mirageball optical technology, Verbatim has launched an innovative range of dimmable Classic A LED retrofit lamps that deliver class-leading uniform omnidirectional light without unsightly shadows or rings. Interested in more articles & announcements on lighting? Using a unique spherical lens created via a two-colour moulding process, the Mirageball Classic A retrofit LED lamps provides unparalleled smooth lighting perfect for floor lamps and wall sconces where a very even and wide angled light is necessary. Dimmable Mirageball bulbs offer a soft, warm ambience and a harmonious contrast that complements intimate lighting in use in the same space. “By harnessing the expertise of Mitsubishi Chemical, this latest innovation delivers truly uniform light without unpleasant shadows and surpassing all rival products in the market. The resulting elegant and attractive lighting effect offers a new level of design creativity to enable rooms to be transformed into more exciting and stylish spaces,” explains Dick C. Hoogerdijk, General Manager LED EUMEA, Verbatim. To ensure the lighting presents extra warmth and ambience, the Mirageball LED retrofit lamps feature a colour temperature of 2500K rather than the typical 2700K of Classic A lamps. Verbatim’s Mirageball Classic A E27 LED lamp (product number 52322) is being sold through business-to-business channels across Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The Mirageball technology will be unveiled for the first time Verbatim’s exhibition stand N35 at Lux Live 2015 held on 18–19 November 2015 at London’s ExCeL. *Two-colour moulding, also known as two-material moulding or dual-shot injection, refers to a process that uses two different types of material for creating one object. For Verbatim’s Mirageball bulbs, the top frosted part of the lens is made of polycarbonate and diffusing material while the clear/transparent lower part of the lens is made solely of polycarbonate. About Verbatim Verbatim is a leading global company in data storage and LED lighting with a broad product portfolio spanning consumer and professional applications. Verbatim has been shaping the development of data storage devices since 1969 and is the world’s No 1 supplier of optical media (Blu-ray, DVD and CD). The company also markets flash memory, external hard drive storage solutions and a wide range of computer accessories. In addition, the company is an innovator in fast-growing LED and OLED lighting, developing products that offer low power consumption, long life and a better lighting experience. It is also an emerging supplier of water filtration systems; its Cleansui brand is Japan’s favourite water filter, and most recently it has launched a range of plastic filaments for the 3D printing industry. Verbatim is a subsidiary of Mitsubishi Kagaku Media owned by Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, one of the world’s largest chemical companies, which invests heavily in R&D across many diverse sectors. The company’s operating principles are founded on helping people to live in a healthy, comfortable and sustainable way. Verbatim’s regional organisations are EMEA, APAC and Americas, with offices in most countries in the world. The company’s European headquarters are based in the UK. Contact: Nayl D'Souza - for Verbatim +44-(0)-1225-470000 E-mail: nayl.dsouza@publitek.com Web site: www.verbatim.com Locate more general lighting vendors in the LEDs Magazine Suppliers Directory Submit new products, case studies/projects, and other press releases at http://www.ledsmagazine.com/content/leds/en/addcontent.html. More from Verbatim: Verbatim anti-glare AR111 LED lamps provide halogen replacements for retail and hospitality use Verbatim PAR16 GU10 LED lamps deliver up to 660 lm along with dimmability and CCT options
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Screw in replacement lamp
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Insulation

Insulation | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
Insulation in your home provides resistance to heat flow. The more heat flow resistance your insulation provides, the lower your heating and cooling costs. Properly insulating your home not only reduces heating and cooling costs, but also improves comfort. HOW INSULATION WORKS To understand how insulation works it helps to understand heat flow, which involves three basic mechanisms — conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the way heat moves through materials, such as when a spoon placed in a hot cup of coffee conducts heat through its handle to your hand. Convection is the way heat circulates through liquids and gases, and is why lighter, warmer air rises, and cooler, denser air sinks in your home. Radiant heat travels in a straight line and heats anything solid in its path that absorbs its energy. Most common insulation materials work by slowing conductive heat flow and — to a lesser extent — convective heat flow. Radiant barriers and reflective insulation systems work by reducing radiant heat gain. To be effective, the reflective surface must face an air space. Regardless of the mechanism, heat flows from warmer to cooler until there is no longer a temperature difference. In your home, this means that in winter, heat flows directly from all heated living spaces to adjacent unheated attics, garages, basements, and even to the outdoors. Heat flow can also move indirectly through interior ceilings, walls, and floors — wherever there is a difference in temperature. During the cooling season, heat flows from the outdoors to the interior of a house. To maintain comfort, the heat lost in the winter must be replaced by your heating system and the heat gained in the summer must be removed by your cooling system. Properly insulating your home will decrease this heat flow by providing an effective resistance to the flow of heat. R-VALUES An insulating material’s resistance to conductive heat flow is measured or rated in terms of its thermal resistance or R-value — the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating effectiveness. The R-value depends on the type of insulation, its thickness, and its density. When calculating the R-value of a multilayered installation, add the R-values of the individual layers. Installing more insulation in your home increases the R-value and the resistance to heat flow. To determine how much insulation you need for your climate, consult a localinsulation contractor. The effectiveness of an insulation material’s resistance to heat flow also depends on how and where the insulation is installed. For example, insulation that is compressed will not provide its full rated R-value. The overall R-value of a wall or ceiling will be somewhat different from the R-value of the insulation itself because heat flows more readily through studs, joists, and other building materials, in a phenomenon known as thermal bridging. In addition, insulation that fills building cavities densely enough to reduce airflow can also reduce convective heat loss. Unlike traditional insulation materials, radiant barriers are highly reflective materials that re-emit radiant heat rather than absorbing it, reducing cooling loads. As such, a radiant barrier has no inherent R-value. Although it is possible to calculate an R-value for a specific radiant barrier or reflective insulation installation, the effectiveness of these systems lies in their ability to reduce heat gain by reflecting heat away from the living space. The amount of insulation or R-value you’ll need depends on your climate, type of heating and cooling system, and the part of the house you plan to insulate. To learn more, see our information on adding insulation to an existing house or insulating a new house. Also, remember that air sealing and moisture control are important to home energy efficiency, health, and comfort. TYPES OF INSULATION To choose the best insulation for your home from the many types of insulation on the market, you’ll need to know where you want or need to install the insulation, and what R-value you want the installation to achieve. Other considerations may include indoor air quality impacts, life cycle costs, recycled content, embodied energy, and ease of installation, especially if you plan to do the installation yourself. Some insulation strategies require professional installation, while homeowners can easily handle others. INSULATION MATERIALS Insulation materials run the gamut from bulky fiber materials such as fiberglass, rock and slag wool, cellulose, and natural fibers to rigid foam boards to sleek foils. Bulky materials resist conductive and — to a lesser degree — convective heat flow in a building cavity. Rigid foam boards trap air or another gas to resist conductive heat flow. Highly reflective foils in radiant barriers and reflective insulation systems reflect radiant heat away from living spaces, making them particularly useful in cooling climates. Other less common materials such as cementitious and phenolic foams and vermiculite and perlite are also available.
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Different types of insulation
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European Heat Pump Market - Outlook

“A decarbonized energy system without heat pumps is nearly unthinkable. This fact has increasingly been recognized by EU policy makers and stake-holders ...”
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China raises solar installation target for 2015 | Reuters

China raises solar installation target for 2015 | Reuters | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
China has raised its solar power installation target for 2015 by 30 percent from its previous goal, state media reported, potentially adding to overcapacity as insufficient grid capacity remains a hurdle for the new plants to deliver power.
Michael John Carter's insight:
China adds another 5GW of solar on top of their 17GW this year!,,
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New heating and hot water energy label rules could boost renewables market - Business Green

New heating and hot water energy label rules could boost renewables market - Business Green | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
Systems required to display a label rating from A+++ to G as of Saturday,Legislation ,European Union,Solar Thermal,Solar Trade Association,Labelling
Michael John Carter's insight:

At last you can gauge what you are buying

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A Unique, Compact and Energy Positive Concept Home

A Unique, Compact and Energy Positive Concept Home | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it

Architect Paul Lukez has come up with a concept for a compact home, which would be super insulated and energy positive. While still in the concept stage, it does look quite promising. The design of the home was inspired by New England’s barns and New York’s lofts and that is quite a mixture...


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Catherine Devin's curator insight, September 15, 2015 2:40 AM

Double inspiration pour un projet de maison à énergie positive, qui au delà d'assurer le confort thermique, cherche aussi à procurer un habitat au quotidien agréable et stylé.

SustainOurEarth's curator insight, September 15, 2015 3:21 AM

add your insight ...

V.W. Reviews's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:51 AM

This is an energy-saving house.

Rescooped by Michael John Carter from Solar Energy projects & Energy Efficiency
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Why storing solar energy and using it at night is closer than you think

Why storing solar energy and using it at night is closer than you think | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
“ A number of significant projects are now blending solar energy and battery storage at the utility scale.”

In May, when Tesla Motors announced its new battery product to vast media buzz, the talk was all about people putting batteries in their solar-powered homes, and thereby becoming that much less reliant on the grid.

But there was always another and perhaps even bigger side of the story — the idea that very large scale batteries or battery packs could help out the grid itself by storing large amounts of solar energy for use in the evening or at night. The ultimate effect might be to displace electricity generated from coal or natural gas, and convert an inherently “intermittent” renewable energy source — solar — into a more constant one.


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Is Concentrating Solar Power The Technology That Saves Humanity?

Is Concentrating Solar Power The Technology That Saves Humanity? | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
“ Concentrating solar power (CSP) could unlock our clean energy future and boost solar from an intermittent contributor to a baseload generator – if we clear the regulatory, technological, and financial hurdles standing in the way.”
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Quantifying Returns: Does Energy Storage Coupled with PV Offer Big Savings?

Quantifying Returns: Does Energy Storage Coupled with PV Offer Big Savings? | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
“ Still in their infancy, battery-based intelligent storage systems haven't built up the performance track record most banks and investors like to see when committing capital to a new technology, project or company.”
Via Pol Bacquet
Michael John Carter's insight:
Using a combination of batteries and panels can reduce your electricity bill!
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Kanaga Gnana's curator insight, July 8, 2015 2:32 AM

Quantifying Returns: Does Energy Storage Coupled with PV Offer Big Savings?

Rescooped by Michael John Carter from Solar Energy projects & Energy Efficiency
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6 Months Later, Here's What's Happened to the Netherlands' Solar Bike Paths

6 Months Later, Here's What's Happened to the Netherlands' Solar Bike Paths | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it

A Dutch project to turn the nation's bike paths into energy-generating solar roadways has just cleared its first major test with flying colors.

Al Jazeera reports SolaRoad's 70-meter test track near the town of Krommenie outside Amsterdam has generated over 3,000 kilowatt-hours over its first six months of operation, or "enough to provide a single-person household with electricity for a year." That translates to 70 kwh per square meter of solar road per year, which the designers predicted as an "upper limit" during the planning process.

Basically, it works really, really well.


Via Pol Bacquet
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Kees van der Leun on Twitter

Kees van der Leun on Twitter | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
On Wednesday afternoon
MT @EnergiewendeGER: #Renewable power production in Germany hit 45GW this week. pic.twitter.com/pHL8yKeMxI
Michael John Carter's insight:
45GW is a lot power from a solar panel
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Here’s How Electric Cars Will Cause the Next Oil Crisis

Here’s How Electric Cars Will Cause the Next Oil Crisis | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
A shift is under way that will lead to widespread adoption of EVs in the next decade.
Michael John Carter's insight:
Another disruptive technology
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These Sky-High Balloons Could Generate More Power Than Solar Panels

These Sky-High Balloons Could Generate More Power Than Solar Panels | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it

For all the cost and efficiency improvements in solar panels in the last few years, all land-based photovoltaics have one serious Achilles Heel: performance is dependent on the weather. If clouds are in the way, even the best solar panels don't work that well.
That's why Jean-François Guillemoles wants to look above the clouds. A solar researcher from France, he's proposing floating solar balloons that potentially could generate three times as much power-per-foot as their terrestrial brethren. His design would also be able to store energy as well as generate power.


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radiant floor heating

pex radiant floor heating hydronic radiant floor heating radiant floor heating retrofit radiant floor heating troubleshooting radiant floor heating in slab r...
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Sustainable living by Thea Holm: "Just tell your story"

“The ultimate example of a modern earth friendly lifestyle, dedicated to education and training for sustainable development.”
Michael John Carter's insight:
Solar sustainablility
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Rotex GCU Room Controller Hot Water Over-Ride

“Quick setting of Domestic Hot Water at any time without having to alter the nprmsl system time settings.”
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Rotex controller Rocon
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Jaga whitepaper hydronic alternatives

As an increasing number of people look to improve the energy efficiency of their homes and businesses, geothermal and Hydronic heating systems are becoming increasingly prevalent throughout Canada.
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Stanford researchers 'cool' sunlight to improve solar cell efficiency

Stanford researchers 'cool' sunlight to improve solar cell efficiency | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it

A team of researchers from Stanford University have devised an ingenious means of boosting the efficiency of solar panels by exploiting a fundamental physics phenomenon. Solar panels lose efficiency as they heat up. Just as the top of your head radiates excess body heat as infrared light, the researchers have developed a translucent overlay comprised of patterned silica that does the same for solar panels. The overlay separates the visible spectrum of light (which generates electricity) from its thermal radiation (aka heat), effectively "cooling" the incoming light, radiating the heat away from the panel while allowing more photons to be converted into electricity.


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10 Huge Lessons We’ve Learned From Solar Power Success In Germany

10 Huge Lessons We’ve Learned From Solar Power Success In Germany | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
“ Fox & Friends last week had the apparent bravery (or ill-conceived agenda) to mention Germany's huge solar power success. We've written three articles in response to the Fox & Friends clip: Fox News: Can You Get Any More Insane?”
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Valar Mathi's curator insight, March 6, 2013 10:37 AM

"Germany may be the only country in the world where the taxi drivers can talk to you at length about energy policy. The same goes for energy use, the cost of energy, etc."

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6 Months Later, Here's What's Happened to the Netherlands' Solar Bike Paths

6 Months Later, Here's What's Happened to the Netherlands' Solar Bike Paths | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it

A Dutch project to turn the nation's bike paths into energy-generating solar roadways has just cleared its first major test with flying colors.

Al Jazeera reports SolaRoad's 70-meter test track near the town of Krommenie outside Amsterdam has generated over 3,000 kilowatt-hours over its first six months of operation, or "enough to provide a single-person household with electricity for a year." That translates to 70 kwh per square meter of solar road per year, which the designers predicted as an "upper limit" during the planning process.

Basically, it works really, really well.


Via Pol Bacquet
Michael John Carter's insight:
Solar roads work
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How Cheap Can Solar Get? Very Cheap Indeed

How Cheap Can Solar Get? Very Cheap Indeed | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it
“ Electricity cost is now coupled to the ever-decreasing price of technology. It’s profoundly disruptive to other electricity-generating technologies and businesses. And it’s good news for both people and the planet.”

Let’s look at some data. Here are cost of solar Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) signed in the US over the last several years. PPAs are contracts to sell electricity, in this case from solar photovoltaic plants, at a pre-determined price. Most utility-scale solar installations happen with a PPA.

In the US, the price embedded in solar PPAs has dropped over the last 7-8 years from around $200 / MWh (or 20 cents / kwh) to a low of around $40 / MWh (or 4 cents per kwh).


Via Pol Bacquet
Michael John Carter's insight:
Prices going down
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Simon BdR's curator insight, August 13, 2015 3:20 AM

4 cents per kWh ! Way cheaper than nuclear power, which in fact is way more expensive than today's prices due to decommissioning and waste management (for thousands of years).

Ashley Hawley's curator insight, September 14, 2015 10:43 AM

I like his opinion because about save money to use a Solar to compare as price! So need think twice before to buy solar to be enough as money to can get. And when get solar is more cheap on bills for houses.

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Why the Future is Green

Why the Future is Green | Sustainable Living Through Technology and Nature | Scoop.it

Using recyclable natural resources in construction plays a large part in green architecture. But that’s not all. Sustainable architecture also facilitates natural ventilation and lighting and reduces dependency on external resources. For example, one could use green roof systems, which can significantly reduce heating and cooling costs at home. Green architecture also goes a long way in controlling pollution. Sustainable residential landscapes include the use of planting trees for shade, clean energy resources like solar power, high performance windows “tuned” to the sun, tightly sealed construction, recycling bins, compost, rooftop water catchment systems, avoiding ozone-depleting materials and using salvaged building material.


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