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The Joker effect: cooperation driven by destructive agents

Understanding the emergence of cooperation is a central issue in evolutionary game theory. The hardest setup for the attainment of cooperation in a population of individuals is the Public Goods game in which cooperative agents generate a common good at their own expenses, while defectors "free-ride" this good. Eventually this causes the exhaustion of the good, a situation which is bad for everybody. Previous results have shown that introducing reputation, allowing for volunteer participation, punishing defectors, rewarding cooperators or structuring agents, can enhance cooperation. Here we present a model which shows how the introduction of rare, malicious agents -that we term jokers- performing just destructive actions on the other agents induce bursts of cooperation. The appearance of jokers promotes a rock-paper-scissors dynamics, where jokers outbeat defectors and cooperators outperform jokers, which are subsequently invaded by defectors. Thus, paradoxically, the existence of destructive agents acting indiscriminately promotes cooperation.


Via Ashish Umre, Spaceweaver
kalexandera's insight:

The silver lining and perhaps proof that good is meant to win!

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Spaceweaver's curator insight, September 27, 2013 7:18 AM

Very interesting. Yet it is known that one of the best unifying forces is a common adversary.

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Ice melt highlights Inuit plight - Climate News Network

Ice melt highlights Inuit plight - Climate News Network | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
9 December, 2015 – COP21: As Arctic peoples’ leaders appeal for unity to halt global warming, scientists report that Greenland’s glaciers are melting at a speed not seen since the last Ice Age.

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

This should be SUCH a definitive piece of information - ice millions of years old that can't be replaced, yet we hesitate.....

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Stereotypes around aging can negatively impact memory and hearing

Stereotypes around aging can negatively impact memory and hearing | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
A study led by researchers at the University of Toronto shows that when older adults feel negatively about aging, they may lack confidence in their abilities to hear and remember things, and perform poorly at both.

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

Thoughts create reality

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Gene in 'last resort' antibiotics resistance found in Denmark

Gene in 'last resort' antibiotics resistance found in Denmark | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
A gene that makes bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotics has been found in Denmark, a new study has shown, after first being identified by researchers in China.

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

Hum, yet another milestone with unintended consequences.

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5 Things you Need to Know About COP21

5 Things you Need to Know About COP21 | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it

October 30th marked one month until world leaders converge in Paris for COP21, the 2015 Paris Climate Conference. Here are five things you should know about it.


Via Climate Action
kalexandera's insight:

We need to get this right!

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Climate Action's curator insight, November 2, 2015 5:53 AM

Check out this informative article and video on what to expect at COP21!

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Testosterone Levels, Empathy May Predict Dad's Parenting Style

Testosterone Levels, Empathy May Predict Dad's Parenting Style | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
Testosterone levels and empathetic tendencies may predict a man's parenting skills, according to a recent study.

Researchers at the University of Michigan found that when men saw their infants in distress, it lowered their testosterone levels--which can affect sex drive and other health factors.

 


During the study, researchers examined 175 men whose spouse/partner was pregnant with their second child. The researchers took hormone tests via saliva samples to assess father-infant interaction. Participants were also required to participate in a videotaped activity in which the child was separated from the father for a short period of time and then later reunited with him or her.


Kathleen Lees


Via Edwin Rutsch
kalexandera's insight:

We are starting to look at what are social model for masculinity is doing to men - and the picture isn't pretty. This can open minds.

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Living on Earth: Exxon Denied its Own Climate Research

Living on Earth: Exxon Denied its Own Climate Research | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it

Investigations by InsideClimate News and the Los Angeles Times reveal that Exxon’s scientists and top management, informed by the company’s own ambitious climate research, had grasped the import of climate change by the early 1980s. ICN reporter Neela Banerjee tells host Steve Curwood how they discovered the research and how top Exxon management nevertheless cast doubt on the facts of global warming, starting in the late 1990s.


Via SustainOurEarth
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Duh...as far as I'm concerned. I'm ashamed it has taken so long to call the pot black.

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COP21 Calculator Launches to Show Scale of Action Needed at Paris Summit

COP21 Calculator Launches to Show Scale of Action Needed at Paris Summit | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
Climate-KIC UK has helped develop the COP21 Calculator – the first interactive model showing the effectiveness of nations’ COP21 pledges to prevent dangerous climate change.

Via Climate Action
kalexandera's insight:

How I wish that we would finally understand that committing to change is a win-win! The finger pointing serves no one, but does show how important our egos are. We are willing to die as long as we look good. Amazing!

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Climate Action's curator insight, October 20, 2015 12:30 PM

Check out this calculator that was created to measure the effectiveness of the INDCs!

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Einstein's "Holy Curiosity" and 3 Ways Amazement Can Change Your Life and Leadership Ability

Einstein's "Holy Curiosity" and 3 Ways Amazement Can Change Your Life and Leadership Ability | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it

Warren Berger's, A More Beautiful Question, draws a direct connection between curious inquiry and many of today’s most innovative entrepreneurs and designers. Design breakthroughs such as the Square credit card reader, Pandora internet radio, the Nest thermostat, and the business model for Airbnb all began with curious people wondering why a particular problem or human need existed—and how it might best be addressed. In today’s Silicon Valley, coming up with the right curious question can ultimately yield a payoff in the billions.


Via David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
kalexandera's insight:

Don't squelch your kids incessant questioning!!!!!!!

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David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's curator insight, April 19, 2015 1:59 PM

Warren Berger's "A More Beautiful Question" and this summarizing Fast Company article is required reading for leaders in our Deep Dive program--in our senior leadership deep dive into cultivating the capacity for Appreciative Inquiry into things that work, and give life, and inspire the future.

 

Who knew a little curiosity could accomplish so much?

Well, lots of people, actually. Decades ago, Einstein urged us to "never lose a holy curiosity," while Walt Disney proclaimed that curiosity was a key to his company’s success ("We keep moving forward, opening new doors and doing new things, because we’re curious… and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.")

 

More recently, there’s been a fresh wave of champions extolling the virtues of curiosity. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman has theorized that innovation is fueled, in part, by the "curiosity quotient" of innovators. The psychologist Todd Kashdan asserts that curiosity has all kinds of life-enhancing benefits, such as improving personal relationships. Author Ian Leslie’s recent book Curious contends that curiosity may be the "most valuable asset" of any society that aspires to progress and creativity.

Rescooped by kalexandera from Cities, urban management and ecosystem services
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How Cities Use Parks for ... Green Infrastructure

How Cities Use Parks for ... Green Infrastructure | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it

Executive Summary

Just as growing communities need to upgrade and expand their built infrastructure of roads, sewers, and utilities, they also need to upgrade and expand their green infrastructure, the interconnected system of green spaces that conserves natural ecosystem values and functions, sustains clear air and water, and provides a wide array of benefits to people and wildlife. Green infrastructure is a community's natural life support system, the ecological framework needed for environmental and economic sustainability.1

In their role as green infrastructure, parks and open space are a community necessity. By planning and managing urban parks as parts of an interconnected green space system, cities can reduce flood control and stormwater management costs. Parks can also protect biological diversity and preserve essential ecological functions while serving as a place for recreation and civic engagement.They can even help shape urban form and reduce opposition to development, especially when planned in concert with other open spaces.


Via Mário Carmo
kalexandera's insight:

We have 'discovered' that nature needs wildlife corridors to ensure species viability. Cities need to become 'porous' so that nature can flow through, instead of remaining the barriers to life they currently are.

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Mário Carmo's curator insight, June 5, 2015 12:04 PM
Creating an interconnected system of parks and open space is manifestly more beneficial than creating parks in isolation.
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Electricity Generation and Future Planning and Predictions | The Energy Collective

Electricity Generation and Future Planning and Predictions | The Energy Collective | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
Renewables have made outstanding progress in the last decade. And yet, just as these exciting changes are taking place, the renewables movement seems to be shifting its focus to something that has little or no connection to the fundamental environmental goals: distributed generation, particularly at the residential level.

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

Distributive generation is a foundational fact to greater security AND to cheaper energy.

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How Many More? 116 Environmental Defenders Were Murdered Last Year, Mostly in Latin America

How Many More? 116 Environmental Defenders Were Murdered Last Year, Mostly in Latin America | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
As we continue to mark Earth Day, we look at a new report that finds killings of environmental activists on the rise, with indigenous communities hardest hit. According to Global Witness, at least 116 environmentalists were killed last year — more than two a week. Three-quarters of the deaths occurred in Central and South America. Just recently, three indigenous Tolupán leaders were gunned down during an anti-mining protest in northern Honduras, which has become the most dangerous country for environmental activists. We speak to Billy Kyte, campaigner for Global Witness and author of their new report, "How Many More?"

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

The violence being vented on environmentalists and doctors is a reg flag of huge proportions!

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What California can learn from Saudi Arabia’s water mystery

What California can learn from Saudi Arabia’s water mystery | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia’s once massive underground aquifer system is drying up due to years of overpumping. And California, in the midst of a drought, is heading down the same path. Here’s what the rest of th...

Via SustainOurEarth
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Worth reading...

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The downside of “Drill, baby, drill!”—degraded North American ecosystems

The downside of “Drill, baby, drill!”—degraded North American ecosystems | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
As wells go in, vegetation loss and water use skyrocket.

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

We are trading water for oil - try drinking oil.....

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Good mental health during the holidays means slower pace, lower expectations and forgiveness

Good mental health during the holidays means slower pace, lower expectations and forgiveness | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
On the surface, the holidays appear festive, fun and full of wholesome fellowship with family and friends. Beneath the surface, however, the holidays can be a different story.

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

Ahhhhhh......

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Pesticide found in milk decades ago may be associated with signs of Parkinson's

Pesticide found in milk decades ago may be associated with signs of Parkinson's | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
A pesticide used prior to the early 1980s and found in milk at that time may be associated with signs of Parkinson's disease in the brain, according to a study published in the December 9, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

Non-linear consequences....

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New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise and dangerous temperatures

New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise and dangerous temperatures | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
A new computer model of accumulated carbon emissions predicts the likelihood of crossing several dangerous climate change thresholds. These include global temperature rise sufficient to lose the Greenland Ice Sheet and generate seven meters of long-term sea level rise, or tropical region warming to a level that is deadly to humans and other mammals.

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

We are not finding that the Earth is getting colder, or more stable - so why don't we believe what we DO find?

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One Trait That Gets Them Noticed For Leadership Roles: Could empathy lead to your success, even if you’re a new hire?

One Trait That Gets Them Noticed For Leadership Roles: Could empathy lead to your success, even if you’re a new hire? | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it


It shouldn’t come as a surprise that the employees who prioritize their boss’s needs, interests, challenges and deliver results based on what’s important to their boss are the ones who consistently get noticed for salary raises and promotions. This requires a healthy balance of empathy and emotional intelligence.

 

They’re also smart about keeping track of their accomplishments and saving their list of achievements for performance appraisal time. The empathetic employee schedules a time to meet with her employer based on when it’s convenient for her boss and then shares how she’s been an asset to the team.

Empathetic employees often become leaders


Via Edwin Rutsch
kalexandera's insight:

As we learn the benefits of power with versus the traditional power over approach, this may be one of the defining factors.

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The paranoid world of London's super-rich: DNA-laced security mist and superyacht getaway submarines | ES Magazine | Lifestyle | London Evening Standard

The paranoid world of London's super-rich: DNA-laced security mist and superyacht getaway submarines | ES Magazine | Lifestyle | London Evening Standard | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
Most people come to Mayfair to buy. It could be dinner at Scott’s or a little but rather expensive something from the boutiques on Mount Street. Perhaps it’s a fancy car from Jack Barclay on Berkeley Square. The Bentley Bentayga, the firm’s first 4x4 — bigger than the average starter home and more expensive — is currently the most coveted ride for one per centers. Biggest of all is a new house. The starting price for a pied-à-terre is £5m and the damage quickly rises to £40m. 

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

What a delightful illusion...

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Big changes are occurring in one of the fastest-warming spots on Earth - The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Big changes are occurring in one of the fastest-warming spots on Earth - The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it

Snaking around the snout of Nova Scotia and into the Gulf of Maine is a new, unseen threat to Yarmouth Bar and hundreds of coastal communities in Maine, eastern New England and the Maritimes: currents fueling the rapid warming of of the sea.


Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

Further proof that the complexity of the natural world is hard to predict or even chart, let alone control...

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NASA studying 2015 El Nino event as never before

NASA studying 2015 El Nino event as never before | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
Every two to seven years, an unusually warm pool of water—sometimes two to three degrees Celsius higher than normal develops across the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean to create a natural short-term climate change event. ...

Via SustainOurEarth
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The more we learn the worse it gets...

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Creative Flow: There is Magic in Asking Yourself The Right Questions

Creative Flow: There is Magic in Asking Yourself The Right Questions | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
The wrong questions will destroy your power to create, but the right questions will fill you with inspiration, encouragement and motivation!

Via David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
kalexandera's insight:

Ah, yet another way in which we create our world - for better or worse....

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David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:08 AM
“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” ~ Howard Thurman

Think with your senses; feel curious with your mind. Talk less, sense more. Create your Life. Risk being seen in all of your glory.

--Jim Carrey


These two quotes set the stage for this blog post for writers--and the kinds of questions to be asking--questions that inspire, empower,


Successful people ask better questions!

 
Sushma Sharma's curator insight, November 22, 2015 12:48 AM

The questions that are Empowering and insightful ...

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Urban Patterns for a Green Economy: Working with Nature

Urban Patterns for a Green Economy: Working with Nature | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
Part of a series of four entitled Urban Patterns for a Green Economy, this guide (Working with Nature) focuses on the effect of unplanned, rapid growth of cities on the functioning of a city-region's natural systems.

Via Mário Carmo
kalexandera's insight:

Hummm, Cities have certainly made civilization - as we know it - possible, however they now need to be revamped to make Life possible. I have to say we are working on this. Will we have the time to see the results?

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Mário Carmo's curator insight, June 5, 2015 2:19 PM

The city is one of the highest pinnacles of human creation. Concentrating so many people in dense, interactive, shared spaces has historically provided distinct advantages, that is, agglomeration advantages. Through agglomeration, cities have the power to innovate, generate wealth, enhance quality of life and accommodate more people within a smaller footprint at lower percapita resource use and emissions than any other settlement pattern.

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Battery Storage and Future Energy Planning | The Energy Collective

Battery Storage and Future Energy Planning | The Energy Collective | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
Some predict that lithium-ion batteries will become so cheap that homeowners and businesses will combine the technology with equally inexpensive solar panels and go off the grid. The scenario seems unlikely, but the debunking of this myth doesn't dispel all of the utility's fears.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Popular pesticide hurts wild bees in major field study

Popular pesticide hurts wild bees in major field study | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it

A common type of pesticide is dramatically harming wild bees, according to a new in-the-field study that outside experts say may help shift the way the U.S. government looks at a controversial class of chemicals.

 

But in the study published by the journal Nature on Wednesday, honeybees - which get trucked from place to place to pollinate major crops like almonds- didn't show the significant ill effects that wild cousins like bumblebees did. This is a finding some experts found surprising. A second study published in the same journal showed that in lab tests bees are not repelled by the pesticides and in fact may even prefer pesticide coated crops, making the problem worse.


Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

OMG!

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Cutting Down Trees May Save a Sprawling Forest

Cutting Down Trees May Save a Sprawling Forest | Sustainable Intelligence | Scoop.it
The nation's biggest forest thinning project moves ahead in Arizona

Via SustainOurEarth
kalexandera's insight:

With miles and miles of dead trees in Montana and Colorado I'm amazed we have not had astonishing forest fires in these areas.

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