Sustainable Futures
Follow
Find tag "infrastructure"
19.2K views | +3 today
Sustainable Futures
Things to do, consider and act on to create a sustainable future for people and planet
Curated by Flora Moon
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Flora Moon from green streets
Scoop.it!

Reprogramming the City: New Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure

Reprogramming the City: New Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure | Sustainable Futures | Scoop.it

Curated by urban strategist Scott Burham, the latest exhibition at theDAC explores the array of untapped potential in our urban environments. Through installations such as a light therapy bus stop and a billboard that converts humidity into drinking water, the show will consider how infrastructure can encourage human interaction, perform alternative functions or assume an entirely new role.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Flora Moon from green streets
Scoop.it!

Infrastructure in U.S. Cities: New Urban Bikeway Design Guide

Infrastructure in U.S. Cities: New Urban Bikeway Design Guide | Sustainable Futures | Scoop.it

In 2000, the District of Columbia had three miles of bike lanes. Today, the district has roughly 80 miles of bike infrastructure, and many other U.S. cities have made similar investments. Bicycling Magazine’s top 50 bike friendly cities includes some unsurprising places at the top – Minneapolis, Portland, Boulder, Seattle – but also shows how cities such as Cleveland, Miami, and Baltimore have made important strides in the last several years to improve their bike systems. Several are members of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), which has put out its best-selling Urban Bikeway Design Guide, first released in 2011, now with an updated second edition this year.

NACTO’s updated second edition is part of their “sustained commitment to making city streets safer for everyone using them.” Reformatted with improved structure, it features photos, diagrams, and 3-D renderings of wide-ranging best practices in design for bike infrastructure...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Flora Moon from green streets
Scoop.it!

Building a Sustainable U.S. Infrastructure: A Whole Systems Approach

Building a Sustainable U.S. Infrastructure: A Whole Systems Approach | Sustainable Futures | Scoop.it

We need to take a whole systems approach to repairing and advancing our U.S. infrastructure.


An important, yet not yet widely adopted solution is the application of a whole systems approach—one that considers the interconnections between infrastructure projects and their surroundings, and that spans the entire lifecycle of infrastructure projects, from design and construction to operation and maintenance.  

Although this approach may involve upfront costs, this model can bolster efficiency, garner public support, and improve resiliency to natural disasters, resulting in significant short- and long-term payback. A whole systems approach should simultaneously address the needs of all stakeholders, and provide community, environmental, and economic benefits for all types of infrastructure projects, from pipelines to bridges to ports to airports...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Flora Moon from green streets
Scoop.it!

New York City Commits to Green Solution for Harnessing Water

New York City Commits to Green Solution for Harnessing Water | Sustainable Futures | Scoop.it
With a landmark announcement this week, New York City has officially joined a growing number of cities around the country in embracing a smarter--and paradigm-shifting--approach to reducing water pollution. Using a suite of techniques like strategically located street plantings, porous pavements, and green roofs, collectively known as green infrastructure, New York is turning the problem of excess stormwater into a solution that will improve the health and livability of its neighborhoods, while cleaning up the waterways that course through and around the city.

It's hard to overstate what a dramatic shift in thinking this represents. Instead of viewing stormwater as waste, New York is turning it into a resource. With this move, New York is showing the rest of the country that if the largest city in the U.S. can finally tackle its chronic water pollution problems with green infrastructure--they can, too.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Flora Moon from green streets
Scoop.it!

How Will Automated Cars Change Landscape Architecture?

How Will Automated Cars Change Landscape Architecture? | Sustainable Futures | Scoop.it

A look at how the inevitable technology of automated cars will change the face of landscape architecture.


Our cities were built to be the backbone support of the industrial revolution. Our roads were built to accommodate the car and truck. Our soil is radically altered due to fertilizers and farm practices of the past. Time and time again we can look at the trend of technology being introduced and a few decades later it fundamentally changes the way we look at the landscape...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, September 25, 4:34 PM

Parking lots can now be further away and we will be able to work while in our cars without endangering others.  Suburbs can be further away.  We will change our cars to be more like mini offices and lounges.  Sounds great to me.  

Rescooped by Flora Moon from green streets
Scoop.it!

Chicago's New High Tech Lamp Posts Will Track People & Pollution

Chicago's New High Tech Lamp Posts Will Track People & Pollution | Sustainable Futures | Scoop.it

Starting this summer, the city is installing a network of high tech lamp posts that will keep track of all kinds of information about the environment and people passing by through sensors. The data collected by Web-connected sensors will be used to help urban planners make the city safer and make traffic flow better. All of this while also tracking environmental factors like air quality.

More information at the article.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, July 9, 12:09 PM

great use of technology

Rescooped by Flora Moon from green streets
Scoop.it!

The New Architecture of Smart Cities

The New Architecture of Smart Cities | Sustainable Futures | Scoop.it
What makes a city a “Smart City” as opposed to a city where some “smart things” happen?

 

Three obvious criteria for answering that question stand out:

1. Smart Cities are led from the top – they have a strong and visionary leader championing the Smart agenda across the city. 

2. Smart Cities have a stakeholder forum – they have drawn together a community of city stakeholders across the city. Those stakeholders have not only created a compelling vision for a Smart City; they have committed to taking an ongoing role coordinating a programme to deliver it. 

3. Smart Cities invest in technology infrastructure – they are deploying the required information and communication technology (ICT) platforms across the city; and doing so in such a way as to support the integration of information and activity across city systems.

 

It’s also important, though, to consider what is different about the structure and organisation of city systems in a Smart City. How does a city decide which technology infrastructures are required? Which organizations will make use of them, and how? How can they be designed and delivered so that they effectively serve individuals, communities and businesses in the city? What other structures and processes are required to achieve this progress in a Smart City?

 

Read on to learn about the design of the infrastructures and systems of Smart Cities and view  them visually represented in an accompanying diagram.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Flora Moon from green streets
Scoop.it!

Sustainable Infrastructure as Public Amenity

Sustainable Infrastructure as Public Amenity | Sustainable Futures | Scoop.it

Ok, I’m impressed.  Have you seen Sherbourne Common? If you haven’t, I suggest that  you check it out.  This is the most recent project to be unveiled as part of Toronto’s ambitious waterfront.

Designed by landscape architects Phillips Farevaag Smallenberg, Sherbourne Common is an example of how critical infrastructure – in this case a neighbourhood storm water treatment facility – can be fully integrated into a neighbourhood. The brilliant part is that the facility doubles as an elegant public space where current and future residents of the planned East Bay Front community will be able to gather, play and interact


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.