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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Lucknow Headquarters: A Sustainable Building with Passive Systems

Lucknow Headquarters: A Sustainable Building with Passive Systems | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The corporate headquarters, designed by Annkit kummar of the Lucknow Industrial Development Authority (LIDA), uses the principles of integrating nature and architecture. The proposed Headquarters of LIDA assimilates greenery into the building by providing terrace gardens and recreational space to the employees.

The central courtyard together, with its vertical voids, aids in the wind flow throughout the building, keeping the entire mass cooler during the summer. The 2 voids on the façade and the central courtyard provide a prevalent cross breeze throughout the central atrium, keeping the temperature inside lower, compared to the heat outside. The wind flow through the front and side vertical voids creates a cross breeze and establishes the micro-climate at the interior.
The entire mass of the proposed headquarters is covered with horizontal louvers, as the prevalent heat conditions in Lucknow require intelligent façade features to keep the building cooler. The glazing used through-out the façade would be solar glass which would prevent heat from going in thereby keeping the balance of temperature...

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Skirt + Rock House by MCK Architects

Skirt + Rock House by MCK Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The site was home to a modest bungalow perched on a hill overlooking Vaucluse House. The clients were equally modest, simply needing more space for their family with better connection to the garden, sunlight and air.

The garden was very important, and it became intrinsic to the design. A large rock that sat in the hill to the rear of the house became our focal and pivotal natural element in the new architectural composition. With the underlying philosophy of relative modesty, the new form is setback, maintaining existing amenity enjoyed by neighbours. The first floor is concealed in the black roof form, providing a recessive appearance from the street, nestling into the landscape. Resting on two legs at opposite corners allowed the possibility of a clear opening to the garden at ground and main living level. Opening like an eye to the sky and trees it folds along the perimeter of the plan. When describing to the client the experience one might feel standing in the lounge room looking out, the analogy of a skirt was used and then stuck, hence skirt and rock.

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Sustainable Design | Greenhalgh House by CCS Architecture

Sustainable Design | Greenhalgh House by CCS Architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Greenhalgh House is a sustainable home designed by CCS Architecture , located in the Alpine Meadows area near Lake Tahoe, California. This is a second home for the owner, who wanted efficiency in performance, regarding the needs of a retreat home.

This eco construction adopted rustic modern design using cedar materials. The house is grid connected, but it is also grid independent. To provide maximum view of Sierra Nevada mountains, all of the main rooms are faced to the south, with cross ventilation provided by the operable windows and sliding glass doors on both sides of the home. Concrete materials used partially at the first floor act as thermal mass storage to maintain the room temperature.

This green architecture building is completed by 600 sq ft of photovoltaic panels provided at the roof, facing south. During the days when the house is not in use, electricity is produced and stored to be used on peak days when in use. There is also thermal hot water system located at the roof. Radiant floor heating is powered by the hot water provided by hot water heater powered by the PV. The hot/cool air trapped between the roof and and panels can be used also as additional heating/cooling...

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École Maternelle by Eva Samuel Architects and Associates

École Maternelle by Eva Samuel Architects and Associates | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Eva Samuel Architects and Associates designed this school in Paris, France.

The building’s envelope is a response to several environmental aims: visual protection, increased natural light to counteract the surrounding solar screens, no thermal bridges, natural ventilation and double flux in winter. This school is the first to comply with the City of Paris’s climate plan. The result is a thick façade with varied reliefs – bay, alcove, and concave windows – used horizontally on the roof as skylights and to house air treatment machinery and ventilation chimneys. These multi-form elements enliven and dematerialise the façades.

The atmosphere inside the school is gentle and serene. The only colours are those of the materials themselves, such as the wood of the false ceilings and the bay windows. The façade’s thickness creates a strong sense of protection and minimises outlook from neighbouring towers. The children enjoy taking over the micro-spaces generated by the façade’s thickness, using them as mini-living rooms, for reading, tea parties, hiding, etc...

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G House - Sydney

G House - Sydney | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A typical eastern Suburbs harbour view site; long, narrow and sloping away from the road toward harbour and Manly views. As the house is set lower than the road with living spaces opening back toward the street, a lightweight timber screen filters street views and creates privacy, yet allows light and ventilation to the private living spaces. The house has two living levels; the primary living level opens out toward an elevated view and the lower living area flows out to a pool deck and private courtyards. The sleeping level is positioned on the top level, providing privacy, quiet and commanding views. Our primary design generator was to link vertical and horizontal circulation through double and triple volume spaces and a dialog of floating planes and connected textural elements. Finished such as polished concrete floors internally and externally, tinted concrete bench tops, raw basalt, timber and steel are assembled in a contemporary composition to facilitate easy living and a seamless flow between inside and out.

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