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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Partly Hidden Beach House with Unobstructed Sea Views in Norway

Partly Hidden Beach House with Unobstructed Sea Views in Norway | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Split House is a peculiar beach house partly hidden under ground. The house's two levels are made of natural materials. Each level enables lovely sea views.

The Oslo-based architectural studio JVA designed a beach house that folds into the landscape. Located near the sea, the residence is partly hidden under ground, allowing unobstructed sea views for the neighbours. Capturing the best panoramic views, the house offers a unique living experience.

The roof is covered with grass and can be also used as a terrace whilst large expanses of glass enable panoramic views to relax and inspire. The interior feels light and airy, opening up to the landscape, with transparency playing a key role in this project, providing an incredibly warm and bright environment.

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Betty Fitzgerald's curator insight, April 15, 11:41 AM

I love the uncluttered approach to this beach house. And the sleek contemporary siding combined with the natural curving cobbled walk is perfect. Can I live here!?

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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.

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Underground Eco House in England by Make Architects

Underground Eco House in England by Make Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Building houses underground once seemed like something that was only meant for our favorite superhero movies, but over the past few years many different dwellings like the Aloni Residence have proved this architectural feat can be done as a practical living space.

Dubbed the “house of the future” this stunning Bolton Eco House now joins the list of underground homes, but this one also does so in an eco-friendly manner. The Make Architects designed and built home is the first zero carbon property located in the North West of England. The one story home underground home is built into a hillside, and features four bedrooms, ground source heat pump, wind turbine, and photovoltaic panels to help generate on-site renewable energy. To continue with the sustainable theme, all of the materials used to build the dwelling were locally sourced as well.

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D.LIM Architects Digs Subterranean Forum for CJ Nine Bridges in Korea

D.LIM Architects Digs Subterranean Forum for CJ Nine Bridges in Korea | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

South Korean studio D•LIM architects has completed a multipurpose facility for CJ, one of the countries largest companies. Located at the center’s golf club on jeju island, the subterranean project avoids disrupting views of the surrounding forest and natural landscape. More than half of the volume is dug beneath the ground level, with a large hole subtracted from the roof to filter light through to the spaces below. The circular void is in the shape of the CJ’s official logo, which represents notions of joy – the meeting rooms and workspaces are positioned around this core element to absorb natural daylight and uplifting energy from the sky above.

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Stunning, sustainable design at an Italian hydroelectric plant...

Stunning, sustainable design at an Italian hydroelectric plant... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

In the South Tyrol province of Italy, Monovolume Architecture has completed a hydro-electric power plant that is elegantly buried into the hills.

Functional, contextual, and designed with the environment in mind, it 'converts natural forces into useful energy while maintaining an artfully low profile in the alpine environment. A rather simple solution was found for a space full of loud, bulky machinery while visually making an inconsequential impact of the site. A free-flowing concrete structure peels out of the hills, opening a fissure in the hillside supporting a green roof that camouflages the otherwise industrial building. Thin wood planks of varying sizes are revealed in this split in the ground plane to form a lamellar wall, where the warm light from the interior glows in the pitch-dark surroundings.'

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Lakeside Retreat | Peter Gluck and Partners

Lakeside Retreat | Peter Gluck and Partners | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Architect Peter Gluck and his architect-led design build firm ARCS have created a sustainable family compound in the Adirondacks using concrete geometrical forms buried into the earth.

Conceptually and programmatically, the two buried buildings—a family house and a recreation building with an interior courtyard, amphitheater, gallery, and indoor pool—are essential pieces of a compound on a steeply sloped 21-acre site. The entire grouping, with two guest houses and abundant walking trails, and culminating in a 2,200-square-foot boathouse and dock, fulfills the same purpose as the nearby Adirondack great camps that cropped up in the mid- to late 19th century.

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