sustainable architecture
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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Sonoma Mountain House by Nielsen Schuh Architects

Sonoma Mountain House by Nielsen Schuh Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Sonoma Mountain House is organized to enhance this experience of drama and discovery, as an integral part of daily life.


A single fold in the uplifting roof allows the house to pan across the immediate setting, and expand outward, while embracing the upslope. A continuous deck extends the from the pool along the length of the house, bridging over the driveway to the guest house. The curved terrain drops abruptly where the guest house tower floats over the slope.

Guests arrive to find they are in the treetops. Spaces that occupy the sheltering structure are open and flowing, so that boundaries dissolve both inside and outside. Materials and finish balance comfort and refinement with the rustic setting. An exuberant structural framework knits into the forest surrounding the house...

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Greenhouse of steel trees in Switzerland: a pavilion inspired by nature

Greenhouse of steel trees in Switzerland: a pavilion inspired by nature | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Steel trees with sprawling branches support the glass roof of this greenhouse in Switzerland. Designed by Buehrer Wuest Architekten and located in a botanical garden outside the village of Grüningen, the greenhouse is used for growing subtropical plants such as banana and papaya.

The architects borrowed structural patterns found in nature, like the membranes of a leaf, to create the geometric structure of the roof. 

 

From the architects: 'The new pavilion at the botanical garden at Grueningen relates strongly to its context. The design was inspired by the surrounding forest, not the built environment. Both the formal vocabulary and the structural concept derive from nature. The pavilion is conceived to harmonize with and expand the forest. The geometry of the roof as surrounding membrane was determined by the position of the old and new trunks. The forest was augmented by four steel trees that form the primary structural system of the pavilion. At about five meters, the trunks branch toward the treetop, which forms the natural roof. A secondary glass construction, suspended from the steel branches, encloses the inner space of the greenhouse.'

 

See more images of this innovative and contextually-inspired project at the link...

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