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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Innovative, Sculptural and Enduring Desert Architecture

Innovative, Sculptural and Enduring Desert Architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Apart from the soft breeze, the desert air is soundless. Cactus adorn the otherwise arid, gently undulating landscapes, where sculptural architecture rises from rock formations. It’s the barren land of the world’s deserts that equally lend creative inspiration and challenges for the structures built on them, as they must battle harsh temperatures, dust storms, monsoons and erosion. A few architects have used these challenges to their advantage, to innovate, to create radical pieces of architecture on the dry, rigid terrain.

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Architect's curator insight, May 8, 2014 5:36 PM

El árido desierto es perfecto para arquitectura. Que inspra la arquitecto  por magnifico diseños. Los colores de marron reflejan en la obra de arte. La paisaje es reccomiendo para texturas rugosas. Es muy bein para inspiracion.

dg

 

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Modernism + Nature: the Tower Studio in Shoal Bay, Newfoundland

Modernism + Nature: the Tower Studio in Shoal Bay, Newfoundland | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The ‘Tower Studio’ is dramatically situated on a stretch of rocky coastline in Shoal Bay, Newfoundland, where no roads guide your way and which is only reached by hiking.

Part of an architectural series by Saunders Architecture the Fogo Island Arts Corporation, the studio’s sculptural silhouette leans both forward and backward as it twists upward.

The studio is comprised of three levels with an overall height of thirty-two feet. Its entry area is equipped with a kitchenette, a compost toilet and wood- burning fireplace. Its second level is a studio, day lit by generous skylight.

At times, the stark abstract forms of the studios all painted black seem to disappear into the foggy weather, typical on Fogo Island. Inside everything is painted in a shiny white and as one passes up the white ladder through the horizontal opening one will stand on the roof- top deck with the view of the ocean and the rocky wind-swept terrain around you...

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Three Homes Take Advantage of Environment, Site + Terrain in Sweden

Three Homes Take Advantage of Environment, Site + Terrain in Sweden | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Waldemarson Berglund Arkitekter designed three identical houses situated on a steep slope in the mountainous north of Sweden.

Defined by wood and having a minimum impact on the environment, the residences were especially developed for recreational purposes. The layout of the houses is a consequense of the building regulations and a response to the topography of the site. The great scenery and the mountains across the Ĺre lake can be enjoyed trough the piercing windows.

Here is more from the official architects’ description: “A connection axis extents along the building’s long side, divided in four generously-sized sets of stairs. This space allows a view of the whole house from the entrance to the opposite end. Height difference between the highest and lowest point is 31 stairs, as in any other 1 ½ story house with two staircases. The difference, though, is that these buildings have 5 individual levels. The upper floors shelter the hall, two bedrooms, bathroom and sauna, and the two bottom levels accommodate the kitchen and the living room, with a terrace facing south“.

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In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan

In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Wind-dyed House by acaa in Yokosuka Kanagawa, Japan


From the architect:

A residential building located halfway up a cliff, overlooking the ocean. Thick clumps of trees that grow along the slope of the land surrounding the house cast a series of organic silhouettes that make the slope seem to come alive. We decided that the appropriate form to build would be as low-lying as possible, while also allowing the architecture to become embedded in the surrounding landscape according to the contours of the terrain. This would allow us to minimize the impact of the building on its environment.


The design of the walls plays an important role in creating the overall sense of presence that a building projects. As such, we also tried to prevent the walls of this house from becoming surfaces that would obstruct or impede movement and sight. Glass and screens along the enclosed perimeter of the house gives the second floor of this residence a certain transparency. Slender, deep-set eaves cast deep shadows on the facade of the building, softening the impact of the building's physical presence in relation to its environment.

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The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain...

The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Rock House replaces an older building at the site and had to be well adjusted to the terrain, both in terms of shape, scale, material and color. The house and terraces are partly built upon existing stone walls, the parts of the walls which are new are made of stones from the blasting at the site. The low elongated volume is cut into to allow for wind shielded outdoor areas, embraced by the house itself. These cuts also bring down the scale of the building, and together with the local variations of the section, make the building relate to the surrounding cliff formations.

On the outer perimeter of terraces and pool, a glass fence also protects against wind, but allows for maximum view. The house is clad with Kebony wood, a sustainable process of treating the wood to allow for good durability towards the exposure to salt water...

 

View the link for more great images of the Rock House...

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