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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan

In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Wind-dyed House by acaa in Yokosuka Kanagawa, Japan


From the architect:

A residential building located halfway up a cliff, overlooking the ocean. Thick clumps of trees that grow along the slope of the land surrounding the house cast a series of organic silhouettes that make the slope seem to come alive. We decided that the appropriate form to build would be as low-lying as possible, while also allowing the architecture to become embedded in the surrounding landscape according to the contours of the terrain. This would allow us to minimize the impact of the building on its environment.


The design of the walls plays an important role in creating the overall sense of presence that a building projects. As such, we also tried to prevent the walls of this house from becoming surfaces that would obstruct or impede movement and sight. Glass and screens along the enclosed perimeter of the house gives the second floor of this residence a certain transparency. Slender, deep-set eaves cast deep shadows on the facade of the building, softening the impact of the building's physical presence in relation to its environment.

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Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The goal for this project was to provide a direct relationship with the dramatic archipelago landscape and to create a simple platform which would offer several diverse readings of the relationship between space and nature. Conceived as a light-weight construction in wood and glass and located in Stockholm’s outer archipelago, this summer house was built within the specific conditions prevailing on the island.

Without any car access, all materials had to be brought by boat from the mainland. Wood was chosen throughout the design in order to provide simplicity of construction and to minimize difficulties with heavy transportation.

The horizontal character of the black-stained exterior relates to the verticality of the island’s tall pines, and mirrored views of the Baltic Sea. The geometry of the plan is generated by the specifics of the site; the house sits on a flat surface between two rocky outcrops, and is oriented simultaneously towards the sun in south and towards sea views in the west. With smaller rooms placed behind, the three large social areas of the house open up to the terrace and provide an open platform, criss-crossed by sliding glass...

 

Visit the article link for more images, as well as additional details on the sustainable strategies incorporated into the design and construction of this modern home...

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House by the Pond by Stelle Architects

House by the Pond by Stelle Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Stelle Architects have designed the House by the Pond in Water Mill, New York.

The overall design of the house was a direct response to an array of environmental regulations, site constraints, solar orientation and specific programmatic requirements.

The strategy was to locate a two story volume containing all of the bedrooms, running north/south along the western side of the site. An open, lofty, single story pavilion, separated by a space comprised of two large glass pivot doors, was located parallel to the street. This lower scale street front pavilion was conceived as a breezeway, connecting the light and activity of the yard and pool area to the south with the view and wildlife of the pond to the north.

The exterior materials consist of anodized aluminum doors, windows and trim, cedar and cement board siding, selected for low maintenance, modest cost, long-term durability, and sustainability. Overhangs and sunshades limit the need for summer air conditioning while allowing solar heat gain in the winter.

Specific zoning, an efficient geothermal heating and cooling system, highly energy efficient glazing and an advanced building insulation system resulted in a structure that exceeded the requirements of the energy star rating system...

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Sustainability in Sonoma: Green architecture at Stryker Sonoma Winery

Sustainability in Sonoma: Green architecture at Stryker Sonoma Winery | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This beautiful, family-owned winery on a 32-acre site in Geyserville, California is noted for its red wine offerings as well as its stunning surroundings and spectacular views, not to mention an architectural design that features green strategies and sustainability as key design elements.

Reflecting Stryker Sonoma's 'bold but thoughtful' philosophy, the design expresses this spirit with a distinctly contemporary aesthetic that references the rural characteristics of the site, creating continuity between the natural and built landscapes.


Designed by Sonoma-based firm Nielsen : Schuh Architects, the winery building incorporates sustainable strategies and passive design concepts at the 12,600 square foot working facility. An environmentally-responsive and site-inspired design serves the needs of the program with minimal development impact to the existing vineyards. The design also conveys the the winemaking processes that occur within it through the thoughtful application of local materials, the incorporation of varying levels of visual transparency, and an environmentally-sensitive site layout.


For more images and to learn more about this beautiful, sustainable destination in Northern California, check out the complete article at the link...

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Climate-responsive architecture: Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Climate-responsive architecture: Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Villa 921 is a single-story concrete house designed to protect residents from extreme climate conditions. Located in Japan, at a remote island accessible only by boat, this unique home was designed by Harunatsu-Archi. 

Architecturally, wood and glass walls slide open across the front and rear of the building, allowing the wind to move through the spaces for natural ventilation, while projecting canopies shade the rooms and terrace from the harsh sun. During typhoons, the house and terrace can be screened behind protective coverings, which fasten onto the protruding eaves...

 

More from the architects:

“The usable area of the house only amounts to about 70 square metres,” said architects Shoko Murakaji and Naoto Murakaji. “This is by no means large, but thanks to the amazing views of the landscape, there is never a feeling of narrowness.”

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Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Replacing a lone turnstile and guard’s hut behind the Brooklyn Museum with a series of glass-wrapped, green-capped pavilions and a plaza, the new Brooklyn Botanic Garden (BBG) Visitor Center by New York–based Weiss/Manfredi is a sight for sore eyes. Nestled within a rich context and history—the nearby Prospect Park was designed by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted in the late 19th century and the Gardens by his two sons in the early 20th—the Center’s most impressive feature, its steel-frame design, is also its most vital. The custom-made structure forms a curving vertebrae that is formally elegant and light on the ground, yet structurally robust.

“We wanted it to be an inhabitable topography,” said Manfredi. Indeed, the center’s serpentine form responds to the site’s existing undulations and is shaped to accommodate the grade differential and maximize sunlight and views to the gardens, as well as reap the geothermal benefits of a berm. To successfully do this the exposed 10x6 columns have been welded to varying roof beam depths, ranging from 10x6 to 18x6 to form frames that are organized in a curvilinear, 12-foot on-center grid in an east-west configuration.

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