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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Rural Peacefulness: Sustainable Cornege-Preston House in New Zealand

Rural Peacefulness: Sustainable Cornege-Preston House in New Zealand | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Located in Martinborough, New Zealand, Cornege-Preston House cleverly mixes modern amenities with a peaceful rural environment atmosphere.

Envisioned by architectural firm Bonnifait + Giesen, the 2,153 square foot contemporary residence offers plenty of sustainable features, such as double-glazed windows and skylights for cross-room solar penetration and heat retention, water heating by solar hot water panel on roof topped up by thermostat-controlled electricity and two 25,000 litre tanks capturing rainwater...

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Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.


Architects Statement:

"Shoal Bay is a remote settlement on the rugged east coast of southern Hawkes Bay. The building is designed to be part of the rural setting, raised off the ground and sitting beside the original woolshed, which has served the bay since the early 1900's. The bach is rugged yet welcoming and offers unpretentious shelter, it is the type of place where you kick off your shoes and don't need to worry about walking sand through the house.
The bach is formed of two slightly off-set pavilions, one housing the bedrooms and the other the main living space. Decks are located at each end of the living pavilion allowing the sun to be followed throughout the day. Sliding screens at the north-west end provide adjustable shelter for the different wind conditions, offer privacy from neighbouring campers and act as walls for outside sleeping."


The sustainable, passive design features an interior spatial arrangement oriented for solar gain, shaded in the summer by the sliding shutters, which also provide shelter from the prevailing northwest winds. Also increasing the efficiency are high levels of insulation, along with solar panels that sit between the two pavilions...


Visit the link to view more images of this contemporary passive design that responds to its site and rural context...

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Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.

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Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Madrid-based architect Juan Herreros sees this no-frills holiday home in rural Spain as an animal occupying but not transforming the landscape.

Casa Garoza – a tiny, elegant shed in the scrubby Spanish countryside near Ávila – sits clearly within the latter camp: a modular anti-villa that is both austere and sophisticated. Derived from continuing research into modular buildings at Juan Herreros’ Madrid-based office, it was commissioned by a city-based designer-artist couple who wanted a no-frills weekend retreat. It’s a pre-fab, but in its modesty and scale, a far cry from the recent American trend for “designer” pre-fabs – reinvented double-wides for the Ikea generation.

Sitting on steel legs that are bolted to the rocks on site – without the need for any excavation – the house, Herreros says, is like an animal that occupies the landscape without transforming it. The ground continues uninterrupted beneath the building, suggesting it could be lifted up and leave no trace, and there is no landscaping apart from a simple, raised deck on one side. It comprises eight modules, which took four months to build in the factory (though Herreros estimates this could have been halved), and a day to install on site...

 

Read the complete story on this modular + innovative project at the link.

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Farmhouse: a Collaboration of Rustic and Modern

Farmhouse: a Collaboration of Rustic and Modern | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Building over an original rustic farmhouse surrounded by a serene rural landscape and adding a modern touch to this residential building caught in between eras, the creative team of Invisible Studio re-imagined the details of the 2,368 square feet Starfall Farm.

Located in Bath and North East Somerset, UK, this interesting residence took shape from the remains of an old farmhouse altered to be suited for a contemporary lifestyle, but keeping its charming country side intact. The challenges defined this project, guiding the team towards transforming the “hideously extended, but originally very pretty farmhouse in St Catherine’s valley” into a welcoming mixture of rustic and modern styles. An extension made mostly of materials from the demolished barns allows owners Xa Sturgis and Anna Benn to enjoy more of the landscape than they would have before this extensive renovation...

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Valley Residence In Rural Canada Topping A Narrow Ridge

Valley Residence In Rural Canada Topping A Narrow Ridge | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Located in a valley of rural Canada, this exemplary residence was designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, the same architect that worked on the Port Townsend Residence in Washington. The modern rural house spreads over 6,300 square meters along the crest of a narrow ridge, hence its name – the Ridge House.

Prepared to be both a social and a solitary space, the modern house invites sunlight in, but protects the interiors from too much sun with the help of large overhangs across its single sloped roof. Defined by the surrounding presence of an evergreen and hardwood forest, this quiet retreat is described by the architects: “After entering the site through a thick grove of evergreens, the drive turns to reveal the first glimpse of the home— a long, linear core of cut stone sliding under a single slope roof and through a delicate glass volume...

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Mason Lane Farm Operations Facility

Mason Lane Farm Operations Facility | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
A local firm reimagines the traditional barn aesthetic for a new farm facility in Kentucky. A local firm reimagines the traditional barn aesthetic for a new farm facility in Kentucky.
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Off-Grid, Design/Build: The House on Limekiln Line

Off-Grid, Design/Build: The House on Limekiln Line | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

An extraordinary off grid home built with local materials, that fits right into the rural Ontario landscape, the House on Limekiln Line is an extraordinary artifact, addressing a 220 year old heritage, with a modern aesthetic.


From the architects:

The House on Limekiln Line, a design-build off-grid house, is sited in a rich agricultural landscape.The house is understood as both a mediator to and a microcosm of its immediate cultural and climatic context. An “observation shed”, the house is composed of a series of scales of spaces, each with distinct vantage points, visual alignments, and framed vistas to the larger context beyond, facilitating stewardship of and respect for the productive landscape in which it sits...

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Natalie Curtis's curator insight, April 19, 2013 9:22 AM

Off grid living at its finest- definitely needs to be explored more in some cases. The local materials are a great way of resourcing too!

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Rural Sustainability: Off the Grid Home in Ontario

Rural Sustainability: Off the Grid Home in Ontario | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
For this rural Ontario home, building sustainably was less about high-tech gizmos than learning to truly love the land.

The 925-sq-foot house blends into the landscape with a steel shed roof and siding; it looks like a high-design little brother to the barns on the surrounding farms, and its energy footprint is equally subtle: Designer Lisa Moffitt built it with an array of sustainable features that take the simple home off-grid...


Read about these features and learn more about this contemporary green project at dwell.com.

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Passive Progressive: a bamboo-clad modern farmhouse in France

Passive Progressive: a bamboo-clad modern farmhouse in France | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Among the first Passive Houses in France, this bamboo-clad farmhouse by the Parisian firm Karawitz Architecture brings a bit of green to tiny Bessancourt.

When architects Milena Karanesheva and Mischa Witzmann—the couple behind Paris-based Karawitz Architecture—decided it was time for more space, they knew that they’d have to move their private lives outside of the French capital. After much research they settled on the small town of Bessancourt, about 17 miles northwest of Paris, because it offered an easy train ride into the city and a five-minute walk to the Montmorency Forest, ideal for their two young kids. But as for the house they’d live in, as Karanesheva puts it, “We wanted to use the opportunity to experiment.”

They commenced building in 2008, with German Passive House standards as their sustainability polestar. By construction’s end they had created a 1,733-square-foot home that uses only 4,200 kilowatt-hours per year—about a tenth of what a conventionally constructed house in France might use. With no other means of heating or cooling than those generated by the structure—a tenet of Passive House design—the new home is modeled on the French country dwellings of the area. Regional aesthetic codes also made their presence felt—out went any plans for a terraced roof, in came the barnhouse slope—but the resulting bamboo-clad abstraction of a farmhouse makes a strikingly modern addition to the rural landscape...

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Self-sufficient house for all seasons by architect John Lin

Self-sufficient house for all seasons by architect John Lin | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Self-sufficient house adapted from traditional Chinese rural architecture by John Lin, winner of the AR House award 2012.

Lin, who is an architecture professor at the University of Hong Kong, designed the house in Shijia Village, north-eastern China, as a model that would encourage village residents to be less dependent on outside goods and services.

The Architectural Review has presented its 2012 House Award to John Lin, a Hong Kong-based architect whose innovative work takes him into the interstices of the extraordinary transformation underway in China’s cities, towns and rural areas.

Lin’s winning project is an updated version of the vernacular mud brick courtyard house that populates China’s vast rural areas. His design for a modern prototype of this traditional locus of rural life, increasingly at risk, brings together both old and new, incorporating concrete technology with original mud brick construction...

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Hawkesbury Residence Capturing Views Of Wanaka Valley

Hawkesbury Residence Capturing Views Of Wanaka Valley | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Capturing the rural landscape of Wanaka Valley, the Hawkesbury Residence in Mt Barker, New Zealand, uses the landscape as an artistic, ever-changing art work as part of its architecture. Standing at the foot of the hill behind the property, the elongated shape of the residence allows all spaces to be flooded with the perfect amount of natural light. Los Angeles-based Marmol Radziner studio have completed this stunning 2,150 square foot residential project in 2011 and since then, the inhabitants have been enjoying the modern interiors and landscape beyond, framed by the roof line and cedar deck.

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