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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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CO2ngress Towers: Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness

CO2ngress Towers:  Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

“Every day, 77,000 carbon-emitting vehicles fly past the Congress Parkway interchange, polluting the air. This project creates a gateway over the corridor that filters air and fuels a new breed of car for its residents.”

Aimed to increase public awareness and improve public health, the CO2ngress Gateway Towers absorb the CO2 emissions from passing cars, which is fed to algae grown in the building. The algae then helps with the processing of biofuels which supply the building residents’ eco-friendly cars.

The two towers split and converge at the top to create an iconic gateway to the city. A bridge joins the two towers and contains a public restaurant with views of neighboring buildings. Pedestrian connections are landscaped at the base, giving a human scale to a car-centric urban identity.

Additionally, the double-skin facade helps reduce traffic noise and offers enclosed balconies. Natural cross-ventilation of the units is enabled through the building’s atrium. The terraces are enclosed by bio-reactor tubes which grow the algae responsible for biofuel processing...

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Samantha Hedrick's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:31 PM

I thought that this article was really cool that Chicago was going to build these towers as the gateway to this city. At the same time, I thought it was cool that it acts as a CO2 remover. It sucks up the carbon dioxide from the vehicles of the city and gets rid of it. I think it would be great if other cities could do this also to reduce the pollution.

Kenzie Nossaman's comment, October 4, 2013 9:19 AM
After reading this article I thought it was really cool that Chicago is trying to make a difference. I didn't know that a simple building could make should a huge difference. This article is very interesting!
abbby grace oberg's curator insight, August 26, 9:41 AM

This is important for people to know just encase they go to the same place as it is happening.

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21st Century Roof for Molinete Roman Ruins - eVolo

21st Century Roof for Molinete Roman Ruins - eVolo | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The building is essentially a cover protecting the remains of a Roman assembly (thermal baths, forum and domus) in the archaeological site of Molinete Park in Cartagena, Spain.
This cover is certainly another piece in the urban area of Cartagena whose main architectural challenge is to reconcile very different architectures, from the roman times, passing through baroque to contemporary architectures, making them vibrate together in the neighborhood. It is a transition element, between very different city conditions, in size and structure, from the dense city centre to the slope park.
The primary goal of the project is to respect the existing remains, using a long-span structure, which requires the least amount of support for lifting the cover. The intervention unifies all the remains in a single space, allowing a continuous perception of the whole site. The cover also generates a new urban facade in the partition wall.
The project also pursues a sense of lightness and is conceived as an element that allows light. The inner layer is built with a modular system of corrugated multiwall translucent polycarbonate sheets. The outer layer, constructed with perforated steel plates, qualifies the incidence of light and gives a uniform exterior appearance.
Besides to the steel structure, the project proposes an elevated walkway parallel to the street. It is a very light structure hanging from the steel beams. Conceived as a glass box, with a faceted, partially visible geometry, it builds the street façade and allows a view of the ruins from three meters height. It is also accessible for disabled visitors. This high path permits an overall vision of the roman remains.

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