sustainable architecture
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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Retractable Roof House Kinetically Adapted to the Climate of Melbourne

Retractable Roof House Kinetically Adapted to the Climate of Melbourne | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

As the name suggests, the Convertible Courtyards House, by Christopher Megowan Design, kinetically adapts to the notoriously variable climate found in Melbourne, Australia. This project added a kitchen, living area, dining area, bathroom, master bedroom, ensuite and two decks to a previously overlooked yet charming weatherboard cottage in the inner urban suburb of Prahran. Nestled on an intimate street, the existing house is one of a series of heritage protected cottages. In response to the north-facing block of land, a central courtyard was created between the weatherboard and modern extension in order to flood the open kitchen, living and dining area with natural light...

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Solhuset Climate-Friendly Nursery by Christensen & Co. Architects

Solhuset Climate-Friendly Nursery by Christensen & Co. Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Designed by Christensen & Co. Architects for kindergarten age and younger, this solar-powered, net-positive energy building is sited on a triangular lot in Copenhagen's bedroom community of Hoersholm.

The roof's design was ideal for mounting the photovoltaic and solar thermal panels, which are positioned to capture the most light possible. With 2,691 square feet of PV panels, "the building produces 0.75 kWh per square foot more than it consumes each year," according to Treldal, exporting energy during the eight months of the year with the most sunlight, and importing it during the four months of shorter days. A green roof of sedum is interspersed among the panels, cooling the building, the panels, and controlling storm-water runoff. High-performance wood, compressed to ensure hardness, clads the exterior...

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G House - Sydney

G House - Sydney | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A typical eastern Suburbs harbour view site; long, narrow and sloping away from the road toward harbour and Manly views. As the house is set lower than the road with living spaces opening back toward the street, a lightweight timber screen filters street views and creates privacy, yet allows light and ventilation to the private living spaces. The house has two living levels; the primary living level opens out toward an elevated view and the lower living area flows out to a pool deck and private courtyards. The sleeping level is positioned on the top level, providing privacy, quiet and commanding views. Our primary design generator was to link vertical and horizontal circulation through double and triple volume spaces and a dialog of floating planes and connected textural elements. Finished such as polished concrete floors internally and externally, tinted concrete bench tops, raw basalt, timber and steel are assembled in a contemporary composition to facilitate easy living and a seamless flow between inside and out.

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Mishima House by Keiji Ashizawa Design

Mishima House by Keiji Ashizawa Design | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
This design seeks to accommodate privacy while allowing for comfortable living in the dense downtown area of central Tokyo. The rooms that need maximum privacy, such the bedrooms and bathroom, are located on the first and second floors. The living room and kitchen are on the third floor, with the study area above in a loft. The rooms are situated to maximize sunlight, and high ceilings at the upper floor allow for ample natural sun light from the windows on the south side of the structure.
The handrail design at the deck and translucent windows enable maximum privacy, and teel frame system allows for large spaces, while maintaining the budget and keeping project costs down...
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Skirt + Rock House by MCK Architects

Skirt + Rock House by MCK Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The site was home to a modest bungalow perched on a hill overlooking Vaucluse House. The clients were equally modest, simply needing more space for their family with better connection to the garden, sunlight and air.

The garden was very important, and it became intrinsic to the design. A large rock that sat in the hill to the rear of the house became our focal and pivotal natural element in the new architectural composition. With the underlying philosophy of relative modesty, the new form is setback, maintaining existing amenity enjoyed by neighbours. The first floor is concealed in the black roof form, providing a recessive appearance from the street, nestling into the landscape. Resting on two legs at opposite corners allowed the possibility of a clear opening to the garden at ground and main living level. Opening like an eye to the sky and trees it folds along the perimeter of the plan. When describing to the client the experience one might feel standing in the lounge room looking out, the analogy of a skirt was used and then stuck, hence skirt and rock.

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21st Century Roof for Molinete Roman Ruins - eVolo

21st Century Roof for Molinete Roman Ruins - eVolo | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The building is essentially a cover protecting the remains of a Roman assembly (thermal baths, forum and domus) in the archaeological site of Molinete Park in Cartagena, Spain.
This cover is certainly another piece in the urban area of Cartagena whose main architectural challenge is to reconcile very different architectures, from the roman times, passing through baroque to contemporary architectures, making them vibrate together in the neighborhood. It is a transition element, between very different city conditions, in size and structure, from the dense city centre to the slope park.
The primary goal of the project is to respect the existing remains, using a long-span structure, which requires the least amount of support for lifting the cover. The intervention unifies all the remains in a single space, allowing a continuous perception of the whole site. The cover also generates a new urban facade in the partition wall.
The project also pursues a sense of lightness and is conceived as an element that allows light. The inner layer is built with a modular system of corrugated multiwall translucent polycarbonate sheets. The outer layer, constructed with perforated steel plates, qualifies the incidence of light and gives a uniform exterior appearance.
Besides to the steel structure, the project proposes an elevated walkway parallel to the street. It is a very light structure hanging from the steel beams. Conceived as a glass box, with a faceted, partially visible geometry, it builds the street façade and allows a view of the ruins from three meters height. It is also accessible for disabled visitors. This high path permits an overall vision of the roman remains.

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