sustainable architecture
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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Bio-mimicry in Architecture: Two Award-Winning Projects from Architects 3XN

Bio-mimicry in Architecture: Two Award-Winning Projects from Architects 3XN | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Architects 3XN depict their diligent comprehension of futuristic design concepts with strong traces of bio-mimicry through two award-winning projects – the UN head office and the Blue Planet aquarium in Copenhagen.
Both projects in question stand apart for their iconic architectural vocabulary with strong references of biologic attributes to building design.

Learn more and view images at the article link.
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Norm Miller's curator insight, October 22, 2013 2:51 PM

Imitating nature in design.

Lola Ripollés's curator insight, October 23, 2013 6:30 AM

De nuevo buscamos inspiración en las formas y estructuras de los seres vivos. Dos proyectos muy interesantes de 3XN.

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CO2ngress Towers: Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness

CO2ngress Towers:  Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

“Every day, 77,000 carbon-emitting vehicles fly past the Congress Parkway interchange, polluting the air. This project creates a gateway over the corridor that filters air and fuels a new breed of car for its residents.”

Aimed to increase public awareness and improve public health, the CO2ngress Gateway Towers absorb the CO2 emissions from passing cars, which is fed to algae grown in the building. The algae then helps with the processing of biofuels which supply the building residents’ eco-friendly cars.

The two towers split and converge at the top to create an iconic gateway to the city. A bridge joins the two towers and contains a public restaurant with views of neighboring buildings. Pedestrian connections are landscaped at the base, giving a human scale to a car-centric urban identity.

Additionally, the double-skin facade helps reduce traffic noise and offers enclosed balconies. Natural cross-ventilation of the units is enabled through the building’s atrium. The terraces are enclosed by bio-reactor tubes which grow the algae responsible for biofuel processing...

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Avneel Channan's curator insight, March 27, 2015 8:27 AM

This is a very innovative way of clearing C02 from the air. This is only the beginning of what this technology can bring to renewable energy and can really become evolutionary not to far from the future.  

Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:57 PM

These two buildings reduce air pollution in Chicago by absorbing CO2 from cars and feeding it to algae grown inside the building.


This architectual concept is very amazing, for it may influence many other buildings to do a similar process of removing pollution. Pollution from transportation is affiliated with Unit 7 as an Urban environmental issue.

Clayton Nelson's curator insight, December 3, 2015 10:06 AM

This is a great and awesome idea! Not only do they help the environment their appearance is also awesome. Now someone should convince all other large cities to build these.  CN

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Skygrove: A Modern Skyscraper is a Testament to Adaptation

Skygrove: A Modern Skyscraper is a Testament to Adaptation | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

As with any civilization, built environments must be able to adapt. They must adapt to changing cultures, changing landscapes, and now a changing climate – both literally and socially.

The construction industry no longer develops with blinkers on, placing industrial gain above the effects a building has on the environment and the economy. Natural disasters around the world have further prompted proactive industry movements to make resilient architecture as much of a priority under a holistically sustainable model.
It is for these reasons that the global architecture community has been endeavouring to create architecture that is structurally and environmentally more advanced that what is currently built.
HWKN Architects’ concept for the Skygrove high-rise looks at these challenges, placing a dual focus on both environmentalism and resilience, with each complementing the other...

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South Korea’s Expo 2012 Pavilion: Active Facade Design

South Korea’s Expo 2012 Pavilion: Active Facade Design | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Opened last month in the coastal city of Yeosu, South Korea, the 2012 International Exhibition’s theme, “The Living Ocean and Coast,” is a way for attendees to examine challenges and solutions to development on oceans and coastlines. As the architect of the expo’s thematic pavilion, Vienna-based Soma Architecture designed a kinetic media facade to act as a counterpart to the show’s location by the water and to its multimedia presentations. Working with Stuttgart- and New York-based structural engineering firm Knippers Helbig as facade consultant, the team developed a constructible solution for building one of the largest adaptive structures in the world...

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The buildings are alive: in biology, designers and architects seek answers

The buildings are alive: in biology, designers and architects seek answers | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
As the world’s population booms, architects and designers increasingly look to mimic biology to create less polluting, more efficient buildings...

Experts at the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change say the way we build and retrofit our cities, more than any other thing humankind can do, is number one tool the world can use to reduce greenhouse gases.

Right now, biomimetic innovations have already provided revolutionary ideas for how new buildings are cooled and heated, one of the most energy intensive systems in a structure. Unlocking these biological secrets — how an animal cools itself, such as using its body to absorb water in a hot, arid landscape where life sustaining resources are rare — has already provided tangible advances in sustainable design...

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Radical Nature: Sustainable Architecture

Radical Nature: Sustainable Architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
This interesting short film showcases art and architecture inspired by mother nature herself - an unceasing source for design ideas and innovations.

The brief film went with a show called the Radical Nature Exhibition at the Barbican in London back in 2009 – but it’s content and contributors are still as relevant and fresh today.

Listen to Michael Pawlyn, one of the main people behind the Eden Project, talk about his interests in biomimicry. The idea is to look at nature, her forms and principles (at even the most detailed level) and understand how those principles which have evolved over billions of years of trial and error can influence sustainable decisions in the built environment.

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‘Why aren’t buildings more like trees?’

‘Why aren’t buildings more like trees?’ | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Jerry Tate gave a short talk entitled ‘Why aren’t buildings more like trees? Why aren’t cities more like forests?’.

The talk focused on natural systems and how we can mimic them in the built environment, citing the work of Grimshaw Architects and Michael Pawlyn at Exploration Architecture...

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Biomimicry is Not New

Biomimicry is Not New | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Biomimicry uses nature as a model to inspire design solutions; as a measure of rightness of a design; and to promote the notion of nature as mentor.
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A Net-Zero Energy Campus in the Desert Creates Renewable Clean Energy

A Net-Zero Energy Campus in the Desert Creates Renewable Clean Energy | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Communities located in harsh climates – such as Palm Springs, one of the driest spots in North America – are often criticized for the enormous resources that are expended to make the climate fit for humans.


A plan for a new college campus in the arid region, however, may change that perception. The firm of GA Architects and Engineers has recently unveiled Phase One of its plans for the new West Valley Campus at the College of the Desert in Palm Springs. According to HGA, despite the harsh climate, the new 119-acre site will become one of the most energy-efficient campuses in the United States and will actually produce more energy than it will consume.


“This project has forward-thinking goals that go beyond net-zero energy to embrace a ‘zero-plus plan’ that creates renewable clean energy rather than simply uses less energy,” said Patrick Thibaudeau, vice president of sustainable design at HGA.

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Barlay Industries, Andrew Barlay's curator insight, June 16, 2013 11:58 AM

Something from nothing is allways the most desirable choice in a Sustainable Mode.

Dawn Mullen's comment, June 17, 2013 8:22 AM
This is what I am talking about. A great deal of the technology is already available today to utilize a forward thinking project like this one. I hope for the sake on the earth, and Grandchildren that this type of building becomes the NORMAL thing to do not the EXCEPTION.
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Greenhouse of steel trees in Switzerland: a pavilion inspired by nature

Greenhouse of steel trees in Switzerland: a pavilion inspired by nature | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Steel trees with sprawling branches support the glass roof of this greenhouse in Switzerland. Designed by Buehrer Wuest Architekten and located in a botanical garden outside the village of Grüningen, the greenhouse is used for growing subtropical plants such as banana and papaya.

The architects borrowed structural patterns found in nature, like the membranes of a leaf, to create the geometric structure of the roof. 

 

From the architects: 'The new pavilion at the botanical garden at Grueningen relates strongly to its context. The design was inspired by the surrounding forest, not the built environment. Both the formal vocabulary and the structural concept derive from nature. The pavilion is conceived to harmonize with and expand the forest. The geometry of the roof as surrounding membrane was determined by the position of the old and new trunks. The forest was augmented by four steel trees that form the primary structural system of the pavilion. At about five meters, the trunks branch toward the treetop, which forms the natural roof. A secondary glass construction, suspended from the steel branches, encloses the inner space of the greenhouse.'

 

See more images of this innovative and contextually-inspired project at the link...

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Beyond the Greenwash | Bioclimatic Architecture

Beyond the Greenwash | Bioclimatic Architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
In the building industry, greenwashing is a constant challenge.

 

World-renowned architect Ken Yeang explains that bioclimatic architecture is a way to practice green building in a way that cuts through the greenwash, representing truly environmentally responsible, sustainable design.

In an interview with CNN, Yeang cites nature as his ‘biggest source of inspiration’ and notes that he has taken well-developed design principles from the natural world for more than 30 years. The concept of bioclimatic architecture encourages the intermingling of natural and built spaces, with the latter taking the former into the highest consideration.

Yeang states decisions made at the design stage can drastically cut carbon and eliminate future environmental issues.
“If 80% of the impact is caused by design, you can anticipate the impact at that stage and you can reduce the impact from 80% to the minimum.”
The architect cites finding a balance between the built and the natural as a key to mastering bioclimatic design. By balancing natural components with the artificial in a built development, a large-scale building can be offset by the number of plants and natural vegetation included throughout...

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Curvy Desert Home Mimics the Snail...

Curvy Desert Home Mimics the Snail... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

If you think this curvy desert dwelling looks a bit like a snail, then you definitely aren’t going crazy! Tasked by the Biomimicry Institute’s Student Design Challenge with finding solutions to every day challenges by looking to nature, Elnaz Amiri, Hesam Andalib, Roza Atarod, and M-amin Mohamad from the Art University of Isfahan in Iran decided to design a house that is self-cooling – just like a snail. Step into our lair for more details about this very – ahem – cool home.

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Twisting Acupuncture Tower for Taiwan

Twisting Acupuncture Tower for Taiwan | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This is a Twisting Acupuncture Tower for Taiwan-Green Architecture. Spiral algae-covered membranes are capable of producing biofuels. This architecture is devoted to Taiwan's Khaosiung port city where the latter at once utilized as a means desilinasi, absorption of sunlight as a source of energy and waste recycling...

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Futuristic Taiwan Tower Draws Inspiration from Banyan Tree

Futuristic Taiwan Tower Draws Inspiration from Banyan Tree | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Tokyo-based Sou Fujimoto Architects drew inspiration from the banyan tree (known for having a lattice of roots that give it a sturdy base) to create "21st Century Oasis" — a concept that was recently pronounced winner of the Taiwan Tower International Competition. It may not be a candidate to become the world's tallest, thinnest, or wackiest building, but once it's built in the city of Taichung, its one-of-a-kind design and eco-friendly features will surely propel it to global popularity.

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Growth Spurt - The Architect's Newspaper

Growth Spurt - The Architect's Newspaper | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Architecture is taking an active interest in life sciences that goes well beyond biomimicry. 

The research among academics and practitioners into biology-driven design is farther along than one would expect. And the issues raised are challenging and range far—from radically rethinking the time frame it requires to grow structure to acknowledging that architects and scientists do not even use the same language and may need to invent a new one to communicate.

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