sustainable architecture
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design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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A Living Bridge by Rotterdam-based Creative Group, Observatorium

A Living Bridge by Rotterdam-based Creative Group, Observatorium | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Since 1997, the group Observatorium, based in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, has been committed to creating relationships between art, landscape and society. Designed to be for the common good, their work aims to create a sense of place.


Waiting for the River is a living bridge, with benches, hostel-style rooms, and eco-bathroom  - entirely made of used planks. The 38-metre long zigzag bridge anticipates the new clean river valley Emscher, which is now still an open sewer. It sits over the waste land that will be the site of pastoral landscape in ten years time. It serves as an example for the future development of the Emscher Park in the Ruhr area for which the authorities have coined the description ‘productive park’.

Intended as a temporary structure the house will now be reconstructed and made permanent.
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Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing

Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Light Park is a skyscraper that hovers over the streets of Beijing like a giant airship. Architects Ting Xu and Yiming Chen have conceived the future of high-rises to be a conglomerate of mega-structures that make up for the shortage of urban open spaces on the ground by lifting them up in the air.


The Light Park skyscraper is lifted off the ground with a helium-filled balloon, and it uses solar energy for propulsion, enabling it to function as a non-polluting transportation deck as well as a floating urban park. The technology is based on existing helium balloon designs, using solar-powered propellers, airbags and atmospheric pressure for takeoff and cruise flight. Solar power is utilized to power the uses below, with translucent solar panels located on the top of the aircraft. In order to avoid additional weight and decrease wind resistance, the skyscraper uses a cable-suspended structure to attach the slabs to the mushroom-like cap. The planting slabs are irrigated with rainwater collected on the large cap surface and are distributed in a way which allows maximum exposure to sunlight on each level...


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Amber Qureshi's curator insight, April 8, 2013 1:19 PM

Daaamnnn :O 

Noor Fatima's comment, April 9, 2013 10:01 AM
incredibleeeee
Amber Qureshi's comment, April 12, 2013 3:12 AM
Ikr :D
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'Tind' Prefab Houses by Stockholm-based Design Studio Claesson Koivisto Rune

'Tind' Prefab Houses by Stockholm-based Design Studio Claesson Koivisto Rune | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Stockholm-based studio claesson koivisto rune have has created 3 sleek typologies for prefabricated homes that draw from the distinctly scandinavian landscape and approach to efficient living.


The 'Tind' residences draw their name from the norwegian word for 'mountain peak', a concept informed by the remarkable lack of sharp pointed peaks in scandinavian mountain systems. The softened edges of the range lend the landscape a particular beauty that finds its way into the architecture in the form of a truncated, single pitch roof. Floor-grazing windows are relegated to major walls and all apertures lie flush with light-drenched interiors. Rather than a perforated volume, the home is a rhythmic composition of built material and void, and despite the various models of kit houses, every interior is organized by a central entrance way or staircase and seeks to blur notions of interior and exterior.

While prefabricated homes have many historical iterations, the architectural integrity of the 'Tind' series is preserved through culturally relevant approaches to living...

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Connected to the Outdoors: A Modern House with a Modular Folding Wall

Connected to the Outdoors: A Modern House with a Modular Folding Wall | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This unique residence by Pitsou Kedem Architects gives inhabitants the ability to control light entering the space with a modular facade design that also provides for changing views and varying degrees of privacy.


With great attention paid to the relations between outdoors and indoors, this structure has been designed to convert the interior space into the outdoors with great modularity while retaining its simple and clean detailing. The most fascinating views of this residence take place when the pivot shutters open, allowing one to look straight through the interiors to the rear pool side beyond without any restrictions. Standing in the front garden, one is able to look out to the rear landscape connecting the two outside spaces.

The ability to reverse the balanced composition into a dynamic one is made possible thanks to the design of a system of smart blinds that allows them to be lifted upwards and folded into what resembles a roof. As all the rails and fixtures are hidden when the façade is closed, the changing possibilities also hide in the residence's façade. ..

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Urban Art: Vancouver’s Mixed-Use Tower by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)

Urban Art: Vancouver’s Mixed-Use Tower by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A BIG step forward for Vancouver’s latest mixed-use tower making international headlines, as the 497-foot tall proposal has received an “enthusiastic endorsement” from the city’s design panel.


The Bjarke Ingels Group-designed tower promises to add a twist to Vancouver’s skyline and create a new identity for an undefined section of town at the fringe of the city’s residential area. The 700,000 square foot complex – which contains shopping, housing and rental apartments – was praised by the panel for anchoring itself on a nine-story podium that occupies the disused, interstitial spaces found between the Granville Street Bridge’s entry and exit ramps.

BIG proposes to transform these spaces, which are dominated by cars and lack human activity, into a cultural and pedestrian destination. Glass “prisms” will provide retail and public space, while existing building facades and bridge surfaces will be converted into a dramatic outdoor gallery. In addition, Bjarke envisions the road which crosses below the bridge to become a host for outdoor markets, festivals and concerts. Impressed, panel member Peter Wreglesworth described the project as “whole composition that is urban art.”

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Budapest Students Design Sustainable House for Indoor and Outdoor Living

Budapest Students Design Sustainable House for Indoor and Outdoor Living | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

It may look unassuming, but this sleek black box is the culmination of a two-year long collaboration of more than 50 students from 7 different faculties of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics.


Initially envisioned by two architecture students and built for the European Solar Decathlon 2012 in Madrid, the goal of Odooproject was to encourage a new sustainable life by designing a house where as much time as possible can be spent outdoors.

Odoo’s square plan has two primary elements: the north half enclosure and the south half outdoor terrace, bordered by the ‘summer wall’ to the south. The design allows comfortable living inside or outside throughout the year as the seasons allow.

To provide a comfortable environment, as efficiently as possible, the house uses both active and passive systems. The compact form of Odoo reduces heat loss, while its organization means it has two south-facing facades. The glass façade exploits solar gain, to heat the interior during the winter, and the solar panels on the ‘summer wall’ generate power from the summer sun...

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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:26 AM

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bancoideas's curator insight, February 8, 2013 10:22 AM
Ideas para mejorar la vida
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Kengo Kuma’s Modern Interpretation of an 800-Year-Old Japanese Hut

Kengo Kuma’s Modern Interpretation of an 800-Year-Old Japanese Hut | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Kengo Kuma’s version of the humble dwelling is a transparent temporary shelter dubbed “Hojoan 800 years later” and it is currently on display at Kyoto’s Shigamo Shrine.

This modernized version of Buddhist monk Kamono Chomei’s portable hut immortalized centuries ago in the influential essay ”Hojo-ki” (“An Account of My Hut”).  ”Hojo-an After 800 Years,” on display at Kyoto’s Shimogamo Jinja Shrine, is a tribute to Chomei’s efficient home, often regarded as a prototype for Japan’s compact housing. Reflecting the mobility of the original structure, Kuma’s hut is constructed of ETFE sheets that can easily be rolled up. Working in combination with a cedar structure and powerful magnets, the soft architecture becomes a single, more structured unit.

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In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan

In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Wind-dyed House by acaa in Yokosuka Kanagawa, Japan


From the architect:

A residential building located halfway up a cliff, overlooking the ocean. Thick clumps of trees that grow along the slope of the land surrounding the house cast a series of organic silhouettes that make the slope seem to come alive. We decided that the appropriate form to build would be as low-lying as possible, while also allowing the architecture to become embedded in the surrounding landscape according to the contours of the terrain. This would allow us to minimize the impact of the building on its environment.


The design of the walls plays an important role in creating the overall sense of presence that a building projects. As such, we also tried to prevent the walls of this house from becoming surfaces that would obstruct or impede movement and sight. Glass and screens along the enclosed perimeter of the house gives the second floor of this residence a certain transparency. Slender, deep-set eaves cast deep shadows on the facade of the building, softening the impact of the building's physical presence in relation to its environment.

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Cargotecture – the Rise of Recycling Shipping Containers

Cargotecture – the Rise of Recycling Shipping Containers | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

One man’s trash is said to be another man’s treasure, and now old cargo shipping containers are rapidly becoming sought-after treasure in the architecture industry.


The term cargotecture, coined in 2005 by HyBrid Architecture, is used to describe any building partially or entirely built from recycled ISO shipping containers. It may seem strange that such a simple, aesthetically-unappealing box could be so loved by modern architects, but the increased use of reclaimed materials in architecture is starting to show no bounds.

In a world dominated by mass production, architects are being forced to find alternative ways of designing buildings that will make the smallest impact on the earth. Extending the life of discarded materials and saving salvageable items from landfill is a completely viable approach.

Shipping containers are resistant to fire, termites, hurricanes and earthquakes, proving themselves to be extremely resilient.


Somewhat like stacking blocks of Lego, steel or aluminum shipping containers are a perfectly strong building block...

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Pierre R Chantelois's comment, January 12, 2013 9:56 PM
Quelle excellente idée. Si les gouvernements pouvaient en réquisitionner quelques milliers, ils pourraient en faire don à Haïti pour accéler la mise à niveau de la qualité de vie de la population. Un 12 décembre, il y a trois ans...
oliviersc's comment, January 13, 2013 10:35 AM
Hélas, les bonnes idées ne sont pas rentables...
Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 8, 2013 9:27 AM

I love that I've finally found the neologism for this type of architecture finally! Cargotecture is an upcoming trend in the architect's world and this article is actually one of the most brief and yet informative blogs I may have found in my short search, so far of these shipping container homes and buildings. The containers prove to be a very useful and easily moveable. They are in great abundance, which is fantastic since they are so often used for their resilience to fire, termites, hurricanes and earthquakes. So there's my answer finally to why these containers are becoming so popular amongst architects.

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70F | Sheep stable Almere

70F | Sheep stable Almere | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The city of Almere has a sheep population of about 80 sheep. The sheep are mobilized to keep the powerful weed “acanthus” or “bears-breech” that grows in the “vroege vogel” – forest and “kromsloot” – park in Almere under control.


To centralize and house this population, a sheep stable was needed. The stable is designed with an a-symmetrical homogeneous cross-section. The part of the building where the sheep reside is relatively low; the high part is situated above the (public) pathway and the hay storage section, making it possible to store a maximum amount of hay.

This shape also creates a natural flow for the air inside the building, which is refreshed by two slits at the foot of each long side of the building.  The detailing of the corner of the building, where the long façade ends and the gable starts, is extremely important for the overall experience of the architecture of this building. It emphasises the cross sectional shape of the building, and finishes the long façade of the building, which starts as a façade and slowly becomes roof...

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Phoenix Observation Tower by Bjarke Ingels Group

Phoenix Observation Tower by Bjarke Ingels Group | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Located in downtown Phoenix, the 70,000 sf Observation Tower shall add a significant structure to the Phoenix skyline from which to enjoy the city’s spectacular views of the surrounding mountain ranges and dramatic sunsets. Phoenix-based developer Novawest, commissioned the team to create a destination event to provide tourists and citizens of Phoenix alike the chance to enjoy the unique features of the Valley of the Sun.

The future observation tower is conceived as a tall core of reinforced concrete with an open-air spiral sphere at its top, resembling a metaphorical pin firmly marking a location on a map.
Walking downwards from the top through a continuous spiral promenade, the visitors of the observation tower experience all of the building’s programs in a constant motion, while enjoying dynamic 360 degree views of the city of Phoenix and the Arizonian landscape.  
 
The base of the tower will serve as a public plaza offering shade, water features and a small amount of retail together with a subterranean queuing area. The tower will serve as a working model of sustainable energy practices, incorporating a blend of solar and other technologies.

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Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects

Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Oakpass Residence in Beverly Hillls resembles a sleek modernist box wrapped in floor to ceiling glass, 12 feet above the ground on 10 narrow columns. The structure was elevated to not only circumvent the stringent  setback requirements, but to minimize the impact of development on the beautiful natural site, heavily wooded with oak trees.

This resulted in more light for the interior spaces, views from every room, and more privacy. Also it created a space underneath the house- part carport, part Zen garden. The pool is also elevated on 3 columns and the heavy exterior west facing concrete wall acts as a passive solar heat storage element.

The interior and exterior spaces blend seamlessly into each other due to the use of frameless floor to ceiling glass and a continuity of materials from the inside to the outside.


View more images of this minimalist, passive and site-responsive home at the link...

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Bay House by Roger Ferris + Partners

Bay House by Roger Ferris + Partners | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This residence located on the Long Island coastline is designed to capture and frame spectacular water views. The design also maximizes transparency between interior spaces and the link between interior and exterior.


The design embraces sustainability with geothermal design, daylighting, solar shading strategies and xeriscape landscaping...

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Libeskind's Villa: Sculptural Design & Prefab Construction

Libeskind's Villa: Sculptural Design & Prefab Construction | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Libeskind Villa is a 2 floor (with full basement), 4 bedroom, 5,000-square-foot signature series home that can be constructed anywhere in the world. The Villa creates a new dialogue between contemporary living and a completely new experience of space.


Built from premium wood and zinc, this German-made, sculptural living space meets the highest standards of design, craftsmanship and sustainability. In addition to the design standards, it meets compliance with some of the toughest energy-saving standards worldwide.


A trio of interlocking architectural bands envelops the Villa in striking angles, creating a dramatic, asymmetrical interior of spiraling, two-story peaks and smooth transitions to secluded terraces. Design details reveal style and functionality: A balcony adjacent to the master bedroom is adorned with elaborate metalwork; light wells direct daylight into a sauna; and recessed wardrobes streamline dressing spaces.

In addition to large floor-to-ceiling windows, the aluminum façade, adorned with mullions and concealed fittings, offers maximum thermal insulation, noise reduction and weather resistance...

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Organic Architecture at the University of Versailles Science Library, France

Organic Architecture at the University of Versailles Science Library, France | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Paris-based architects Badia-Berger Architectes have recently completed the University of Versailles Science Library, in France- an efficient building composed of three juxtaposed volumes intersected by a series of voids.

The building acts as a connector inside the university campus, uniting the eastern sloped park and the western sporting grounds, which determines that it doesn't have a main façade, rather, a central position from which its multidirectional nature stems.

The library is comprised of three juxtaposing volumes intersected by a series of voids, which allow for abundant daylight to pour into the building, as well as creating a series of transparencies between the two connected terrains — the park and the sporting grounds. The three separate volumes harbour respectively the entry hall, the reading rooms and internal spaces. "The shape is an expression of our perception of the program and our response to the requirements of a low energy building," state architects Marie-Hélène Badia and Didier Berger, "fully acknowledging lighting and thermal comfort as well as highlighting the site's contrasts."

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Trompetista De Jazz's curator insight, March 15, 2013 12:16 PM

Organic Architecture at the University of Versailles Science Library, France

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G house: Passive Design in Normandy, France

G house: Passive Design in Normandy, France | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The intermittent use of this structure near the Seine estuary, built as a holiday home, strongly influenced the environmental choices of the project. The challenge was to give priority to passive devices and architecture, offering a gain in terms of energy performance, but also for the comfort of the occupants.


The exposure has been a main priority : East-West orientation, oversized opening to the South, natural shades and solar control strategy, North side blind.

Great attention has been given to thermal insulation. Choosing wood slab, and a wood panelling structure insulated from the outside, has allowed us to obtain good levels of insulation and air tightness. Furthermore, the low-thermal-mass building, offered by the wooden structure is interesting in the context of a weekend home, that needs to heat up quickly, for short periods. A wood stove thus is sufficient to heat the home.Finally, the building is based on the dry process framework, with the benefits of prefabrication : quality building, swift assembly, and site protection...

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Michael John Carter's curator insight, March 7, 2013 12:41 AM

Starting point is about the design!!

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Singapore's Archifest Zero Waste Pavilion

Singapore's Archifest Zero Waste Pavilion | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

WOW Architects was selected to design and build the first-ever Pavilion for Singapore’s Archifest last year.


The aesthetic design of the pavilion was a response to the duality of the site, while the zero waste and buildability strategy was developed around two highly rapid deployable and re-useable systems. The first is the main structure, composed of box-truss systems, and the second is a polymer mesh developed for slope control that has unique attributes that enhance the usability and interaction of the space.

To achieve zero-waste, the design team considered time, materials, cost and the afterlife of the elements, with a . The box-truss system, including the roof takes a maximum of approximately 7 days to deploy, while the membrane takes a maximum of approximately 3 days to install. Overall time frame to complete construction is 10-15 days.

The cellular membrane can be re-used in Fort Canning Hill’s other areas requiring slope protection and stabilization or it will be donated to a nearby country whose village/farmland has been affected by soil erosion from slopes.

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Ecology and Planning Museum by Steven Holl in Tianjin, China's New Eco-City

Ecology and Planning Museum by Steven Holl in Tianjin, China's New Eco-City | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Steven Holl Architects has been commissioned to design the Ecology and Planning Museum in Tianjin,China – the new Eco-City is planned the to be the home to population of 500,000 when completed in 2020. 60,000 square meters in total, the museum structure will be the first in the cultural district.


Marking the entrance to the Planning Museum, shared public plaza gathers the visitors around the large model of the eco-city and a temporary display area, further directed to the exquisite space experience of great interiors and program sequences. The top storey facilitates the green architecture, landscape and water resources exhibits and the access to the vegetative rooftop, offering panoramic views to the future city.

Interconnected by underground service zone area and further connected to the central business district of Eco-City by a high speed tram, this museum development represents the initial space experience of the cultural district of this “poster-city for state-of-the-art sustainable aspects”, rising from the Bohai Bay...

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The Non Program Pavilion by Jesús Torres García

The Non Program Pavilion by Jesús Torres García | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Located in Spain, near the Mediterranean Sea, this small pavilion is surrounded by a remarkable landscape. The construction is defined by the relation between the landscape and the structure on the field.


The structure developed itself as a flower, subscribing to Oscar Niemeyer’s approach. The whole project has been composed in the concept of “how to build in natural landscape?” The non-program pavilion disappears in the landscape, attempting to erase the division between the intervention and the area. This concern of integration reaches the point where the landscape generates the architecture itself.


The non-definition of the program has a wide range of uses, such as providing environmental awareness, doubling as an exposition hall or music hall, and providing activities support for the wider community. The interior space is as free as the liberty of program, furnishing the space with the energy of each use...

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Richard Meier & Partners | Italcementi i.lab

Richard Meier & Partners | Italcementi i.lab | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Richard Meier & Partners celebrates the opening of the Italcementi i.lab in Bergamo, Italy. The new building is a benchmark of sustainable design in Europe and it has attained one of the first LEED Platinum accreditations in Italy.


Italcementi i.lab, the new research and development center for Italcementi is intended to reflect the company’s position of leadership, technological advancement and commitment to research and innovation in the use of concrete.

One of the top five cement manufacturers in the world, Italcementi is internationally recognized for its dedication to Sustainable Development. Dukho Yeon, Design Partner-in-charge, comments: “This is our fourth completed project in Italy, after the Jesolo Lido Village, the Ara Pacis Museum, and the Jubilee Church. i.lab is our firm’s most sustainable building to date embodied in sculptural and dramatic, but simple forms showcasing the possibilities of concrete in perfect balance with the technical purpose of the building.”


Each element of the building’s organization reflects an ambitious effort, both in Richard Meier & Partners focus on sustainable architecture and in the innovative use of efficient materials and construction solutions...

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Skyscraper Facade Reinvented for Extreme Desert Climate

Skyscraper Facade Reinvented for Extreme Desert Climate | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The traditional fully-glazed façade so common in towers throughout the Middle East has been reinterpreted by students at the University of Nottingham who were tasked with designing a skyscraper for Abu Dhabi.


The proposal, by Alexandre Carrasco and Omelmominin Wadidy of the Masters in Sustainable Tall Buildings Course at the Department of Architecture and Built Environment instead combines a mixture of thin transparent and opaque elements aimed at emphasising the building’s elegance and vertical nature while improving environmental performance.



The overall design is inspired by sikkas, the narrow alleys between buildings in old Middle East cities. It aims to create comfortable spaces which are shaded from the harsh desert sun and wind while providing suitable areas for circulation, leisure, social and communal activities.

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Crystal clear: the case for green building

Crystal clear: the case for green building | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Part office, part exhibition space, a new London landmark aims to challenge our assumptions about green design.


A new building in east London’s Royal Victoria Docks aims to change public perceptions of green architecture – while trialling some new sustainable technologies and approaches at scale. There’s not a green roof or thick insulated wall in sight. In fact, the structure, which is called the Crystal, is everything we’ve come to believe a sustainable building shouldn’t be: lightweight, angular, glazed from top to bottom and with a roof made out of steel.

Part office space, part interactive exhibition about the future of cities, the building is intended as a living experiment in sustainability that business leaders, politicians and the general public alike can learn from. “The building is a great demonstration of the ‘art of the possible’”, says Martin Hunt, Head of Networks and Partnerships at Forum for the Future. “It’s refreshing to see an interactive exhibition that visualises what our cities could be like – based on high quality research and thoughtful benchmarking. It brings the big issues of urban living – such as water and energy consumption, public health and safety – to life in a way that engages people and inspires them.”

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Duane Craig's curator insight, January 7, 2013 10:13 AM

It's quite enlightening, as pointed out here, that a lot of glass used correctly can actually yield a zero energy building. But I agree that assessing the true sustainability of the building would have to factor in all the embodied fossil fuel and other energy used to make its components. And when you're talking about glass, that could be huge.

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Low-Energy Bamboo House Blends into the Belgian Forest

Low-Energy Bamboo House Blends into the Belgian Forest | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

With amenities such as a heat pump, radiant heating, rainwater collection and high-performance insulation, this modern bamboo-clad house by Belgian design firm AST 77 is as energy efficient as it is attractive.


Upending the stereotypical image of the flat countryside of Flanders, a new low energy house mixes modernism and organic materials to blend into a steep, forested hillside near Rotselaar, Belgium.

The chief exterior materials of are bamboo poles lined up in precise rows along the rectangular 86-foot-long steel-frame box, broken up by a series of square windows positioned for natural ventilation and passive solar.The overall visual effect is reminiscent of a tree trunk rising out of the hilly terrain...

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Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.


Architects Statement:

"Shoal Bay is a remote settlement on the rugged east coast of southern Hawkes Bay. The building is designed to be part of the rural setting, raised off the ground and sitting beside the original woolshed, which has served the bay since the early 1900's. The bach is rugged yet welcoming and offers unpretentious shelter, it is the type of place where you kick off your shoes and don't need to worry about walking sand through the house.
The bach is formed of two slightly off-set pavilions, one housing the bedrooms and the other the main living space. Decks are located at each end of the living pavilion allowing the sun to be followed throughout the day. Sliding screens at the north-west end provide adjustable shelter for the different wind conditions, offer privacy from neighbouring campers and act as walls for outside sleeping."


The sustainable, passive design features an interior spatial arrangement oriented for solar gain, shaded in the summer by the sliding shutters, which also provide shelter from the prevailing northwest winds. Also increasing the efficiency are high levels of insulation, along with solar panels that sit between the two pavilions...


Visit the link to view more images of this contemporary passive design that responds to its site and rural context...

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Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.

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Henning Larsen Architects: Low-energy office building in Denmark

Henning Larsen Architects: Low-energy office building in Denmark | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The new office building of Energinet.dk in Ballerup has achieved the lowest energy class possible by means of optimizing the design and geometry. The building has an annual energy consumption of only 47,7 kWh/m2. Incorporating solar panels, ground water cooling and heat pumps in the project would further reduce the annual energy consumption.

A flexible and easily comprehensible layout consists of three elements: meeting facilities on the ground floor, a uniting atrium and workstations on the top floor, which floats above the sloping landscape.

The atrium is identity-creating, open and active. A significant part of the environmental objective has been to ensure a high degree of flexibility. The open design as well as the light walls and simple, reusable elements will make it easy to change the interior layout in the future.


Visit the link to view more images of this low-energy design in Denmark...

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