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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Design for Ethiopia's New Stadium Blends Tradition With Modern Materials, Engineering

Design for Ethiopia's New Stadium Blends Tradition With Modern Materials, Engineering | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A consortium led by Australia’s LAVA has won an international competition to design a national stadium and sports village in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Its concept blends traditional Ethiopian architectural and construction practices with new technology to create a modern piece of infrastructure.

The team was selected by Ethiopia's Federal Sport Commission (FSC), which wants to replace the current 25,000-seat national stadium with a 60,000-seat stadium and related sports facilities. FSC wants to begin construction in 2014.

Traditional Ethiopian architecture includes examples of excavated historical structures, including ancient rock churches as well as dwellings and cisterns. The team's concept, which includes a sunken arena surrounded by grandstands formed from excavated material, captures elements of those traditional treatments in the stadium’s design...

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Tree Hotel in Harads: a reflection of the natural surroundings

Tree Hotel in Harads: a reflection of the natural surroundings | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A tree hotel in the far north of Sweden, near the small village of Harads, close to the polar circle. A shelter up in the trees; a lightweight aluminium structure hung around a tree trunk, a 4x4x4 meters box clad in mirrored glass. The exterior reflects the surroundings and the sky, creating a camouflaged refuge. The interior is all made of plywood and the windows give a 360 degree view of the surroundings.

The construction also alludes to how man relates to nature, how we use high tech materials and products when exploring remote places in harsh climates (Gore-tex, Kevlar, composite materials, light weight tents etc). The functions included provides for a living for two people; a double bed, a small bath room, a living room and a roof terrace...

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linh pham's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:36 AM

One of the unique hotel in the world. A tree hotel give our customers a new experience giving a most boutique architecture .The room is hung on the tree look like a square with bed room and small bath room, living room.
That was a great idea for new customer finding a new experience to sleep in the forest but have a standard of a hotel room. The great idea for customer but not really good for environment, the water and electricity are also required for the room

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Villa 4.0: a sustainable home in the Netherlands

Villa 4.0: a sustainable home in the Netherlands | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Villa 4.0 is a minimalist house located in Het Gooi, The Netherlands, designed by Dick van Gameren Architects. The prime purpose of the project was to create a home that was much more sustainable than its previous institution.

The existing structure was extended & modernized with insulated walls and windows- walls at the center of the home were removed to create a new living room looking out into the surroundings. The renovation creates a bond between the home and the landscape with a glass pavilion at the living hall...

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Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia: Endesa Pavilion

Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia: Endesa Pavilion | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia designed the Endesa Pavilion, as part of the Smart City Expo in Barcelona, Spain.

The structure brings the distributed intelligence concept to the realm of architecture through a multiscalar aproach. The project aims to define an adaptative constructive system able to respond each solicitation at the lowest scale. By doing this, each single module could answer to his own structural, energetical and enviromental needings. The skin will act as a network of inteligent nodes, a “solar brick” that protects from the solar radiation, collects and storage the energy the data at the local scale.

During one year it will perform as a meeting point for knowledge interchange as well as a benchmark for smart grid technologies...

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Indoor/outdoor connectivity defines this modern home...

Indoor/outdoor connectivity defines this modern home... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Using building materials like steel, glass and metal cladding, Australian studio TT Architecture constructed a complex set of architectural details gathered under a simple name: Carey House. This modern family home was designed to include an extensive system of indoor-outdoor connectivity elements, admired by the owners and considered one of the best features of the house, as described by its inhabitants: “The flow of the internal spaces and visual connection between the inside and outside spaces is outstanding.”

This floating aspect is inherent in the cantilevered decks and bay windows and the substantial roof overhangs.” Materializing into a dream home, this joining of textures, surfaces and voids were intended to become a bespoke set of spaces cradling the owner’s lifestyle with extreme attention to details. Resulting in a perfectly adapted cluster of family rooms, the Carey House displays a necessary visual connection to the surrounding landscape...

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Latiesha Leonard's curator insight, March 26, 11:44 PM

In five years i want to own my own home. Preferably to build my home would be wonderful, I have always wanted to build a home that fits in with the environment and had built using recycled items where possible.

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Villa Asserbo: A Sustainable, Printed House That Snaps Together ...

Villa Asserbo: A Sustainable, Printed House That Snaps Together ... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
We’ve covered 3D Printing a lot here at ArchDaily, but most of our coverage has been speculative and, frankly, futuristic – could we, one day, print out Gaudi-esque stone structures? Or even print a biologically-inspired, living house?

But today we heard a story about an alternative to 3D Printing‘s capabilities in the here and now - and its implications are pretty exciting.In a small town outside of Copenhagen, Danish architects Eentileen joined forces with London-based digital fabrication and architecture specialists, Facit Homes, to create Villa Asserbo: a 1,250 square foot, sustainable home made from Nordic plywood fabricated via CNC miller and easily “snapped” together.No heavy machinery, no cranes, no large labor force. Just a couple of guys, a few easily printed pieces, and six weeks.

The architects are looking to make the houses open to the public soon. If their easy, sustainable, well-designed model is the immediate future of alternative to 3D Printing (and considering it’s such a “snap,” it very well might be), then we’re all aboard...

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Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, November 3, 2012 3:24 AM
we love this house! I am a fan of Facit ..we have pinned this in Pinterest ty :)
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Not Just For Farms: Corrugated Steel Is the Standard in Iceland For New & Old Buildings

Not Just For Farms: Corrugated Steel Is the Standard in Iceland For New & Old Buildings | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Most of Iceland's buildings appear to be clad in this basic industrial material, and it is amazing what they have done with it.

Corrugated iron and steel are the most prosaic of building materials, used in North America mostly for industrial purposes, although a few modernist architects have played with the stuff. Invented in 1828, it was used in the earliest prefabs, shipped from Britain around the world, but fell out of fashion as local building industries developed.

In Iceland, corrugated galvanized iron arrived in the 1860s; architect Pall Bjarnason says that it is a wonderful material for such a harsh climate, and that with very little maintenance it can last forever...

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Shanghai Metal Corporation's curator insight, October 14, 2014 1:38 AM

Corrugated galvanized steel is an excellent construction material. Read about its benefits in http://wp.me/p4BG4t-lL
Also see our galvanized steel products in http://goo.gl/74UANe

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Hurst House by John Pardey Architects and Strom Architects

Hurst House by John Pardey Architects and Strom Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Hurst House is a new build one-off contemporary house located on the edge of the village of Bourne End in Buckinghamshire.

The clients’ brief was to build a very sustainable and contemporary family home that would have the flexibility to successfully cope with changing family conditions as their children grow up and leave the nest. This lead to a house where they can live in one extended space while family bedrooms can be shut down and left on tick-over.

The environmental impact of the house was considered from the outset, and we were aiming to get very close to being a zero carbon home.

The building utilises very high levels of insulation. A small highly efficient gas boiler, together with heat recovery ventilation, rainwater recycling, solar water heating, a 10kW wood burner and a 9.9kWp photovoltaic installation, and low energy fittings throughout, ensure the property has an overall near zero CO2 impact rating...

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Black Timber Box Offering Mesmerizing Views: Storm Cottage Residence

Black Timber Box Offering Mesmerizing Views: Storm Cottage Residence | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Fearon Hay Architects envisioned and implemented Storm Cottage house, a residential project nestled on the east coast of Great Barrier Island in New Zealand, located just steps away from the sea. All the materials used to build the black timber box are in tune with the landscape: “The dark exterior palette is completed with a layer of perforated metal screens. This operable layer allows the moderation of light/air and protection both when occupied and alone. Internally walls and floors are clad with oiled oak boards that provide a warm counter to its robust exterior. Care has been made to limit the scale of the building and maintain a sense of ‘cottage’. The building is off the grid, powered by solar panels independent systems for water collection and treatment. This is a retreat that provides shelter, warmth and comfort to engage with the wilderness and isolation of the remote setting“. The layout of Storm Cottage is simple and practical, centered around a beautiful open plan living space. Two bedrooms flank it to the left and right, each of them offering mesmerizing views.

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Make it Right's New Orleans FLOAT House by Morphosis

Make it Right's New Orleans FLOAT House by Morphosis | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
The FLOAT House, design by Morphosis Architects, is a Make-It-Right home developed for the needs of the families in New Orlean's Lower Ninth Ward, and it is now on track for LEED Platinum.

Designed by Morphosis for Brad Pitt's Make it Right Foundation, it is a housing solution for the floodwater-prone regions around the world. Optimized for efficient mass-production, the home is a culturally, economically, and environmentally responsible structure designed to break free from its moorings and rise to a height of twelve feet in the event of flooding. The two bedroom, 945 square feet model was first introduced in 2009, and as it continues to grow in popularity it is now on track for a LEED Platinum rating with a net-zero annual energy consumption...

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AIANC Center for Architecture and Design / Frank Harmon Architect PA

AIANC Center for Architecture and Design / Frank Harmon Architect PA | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

After seven years of planning and fundraising in the midst of a national recession, construction of the North Carolina chapter of the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA NC) thoroughly sustainable Center for Architecture & Design was completed this summer in Raleigh.

Located on an oddly shaped, previously unused lot in downtown Raleigh near the State Capitol and Government Complex, the new Center is the first AIA headquarters facility to be built from the ground up expressly for this purpose, and AIANC hopes it will serve as a flagship for modern, sustainable urban design in North Carolina’s capital city...

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In Portugal, A Military Base Becomes A Conservation Center

In Portugal, A Military Base Becomes A Conservation Center | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
A Portuguese military site, reimagined as a coastal conservation center, has taken top honors in this year’s Architecture for Humanity Open Architecture Challenge. The theme of the competition, [UN]RESTRICTED ACCESS, called on architects and designers worldwide to identify retired military installations in their own backyard, and to collaborate with local stakeholders to reclaim these spaces for the greater social, economic, and environmental good. The Challenge Winner in the competition, announced on August 1, is the Ocean & Coastline Observatory (OCO) slated for Caminho da Raposeira Estrada Militar, a decommissioned battery in Trafaria.

 

Trafaria is is located on the estuary of the Tagus River, on the opposite shore from Lisbon, once a strategic area for the military protection of the Portuguese coastline. Trafaria’s Coast Artillery Regiment 5th Battery was built back in the days when heavy cannons were the weapon of choice, and battery’s concrete walls and iron slabs — with simple stonework in the eaves, stairs, windows and doors openings — were built to last.

The battery also happens to be located in the Costa da Caparica Fossil-Cliff Protected Landscape, 1570 hectares extending along the coast — which led the Lisbon Architecture Collective to re-interpret this military installation as a battery for coastline protection. By imagining it as a center for defending the coast against against environmental threats, the design aims to supervise the sustainable preservation of the coast while helping to preserve heritage.

“More than an economic asset,” the design team said, in their statement, “the ocean…defines our identity.” The designers reimagine the old military compound as a place where different area communities (including residents, scientists, researchers, fisherman, sportsmen and students), can meet and share their concerns, plans and ambitions for the coastline...

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Innovation + Sustainability at Marthashof Urban Village, Berlin

Innovation + Sustainability at Marthashof Urban Village, Berlin | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

In Marthashof ecological living is defined by geothermal energy, a wood-pellet heating system and rainwater recovery. Geothermal energy can be used to both heat and cool, and the heating systems in Marthashof’s residential and commercial units are also designed to create extra warmth during the colder months. Green spaces represent around 30 percent of the total surface area in Marthashof Urban Village and are maintained using rainwater that has been stored in underground cisterns.

The sustainability concept doesn’t end there: Highly efficient building insulation, integrated heat exchangers to control the ventilation of living spaces, minimized thermal bridges and a generous green roof terrace make the Marthashof Urban Village, built by Stofanel Investment AG, a trail-blazing project.

In December 2011, the Stofanel Project Marthashof Urban Village in Berlin’s Prenzlauer Berg won the eco-immobilienawardberlin 2011. This new immobilienawardberlin award is dedicated to sustainable building and was bestowed for the first time in 2011. Previously it had been awarded biannually in the areas of residential and office construction, retail and specialist real estate...

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Skygrove: A Modern Skyscraper is a Testament to Adaptation

Skygrove: A Modern Skyscraper is a Testament to Adaptation | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

As with any civilization, built environments must be able to adapt. They must adapt to changing cultures, changing landscapes, and now a changing climate – both literally and socially.

The construction industry no longer develops with blinkers on, placing industrial gain above the effects a building has on the environment and the economy. Natural disasters around the world have further prompted proactive industry movements to make resilient architecture as much of a priority under a holistically sustainable model.
It is for these reasons that the global architecture community has been endeavouring to create architecture that is structurally and environmentally more advanced that what is currently built.
HWKN Architects’ concept for the Skygrove high-rise looks at these challenges, placing a dual focus on both environmentalism and resilience, with each complementing the other...

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Actively Passive - 1st building in New York region to meet tough Passivhaus energy standards

Actively Passive - 1st building in New York region to meet tough Passivhaus energy standards | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This artist studio in the town of Orient, Long Island is the first structure in the New York metropolitan region, and one of about a dozen in the United States, to be meet the stringent environmental standards of the Passivhaus Institute, based in Darmstadt, Germany.

 With its rough-hewn dark brown wood cladding, it uses 90 percent less heating energy than a typical house. Compare that with the average house built to the LEED rating system: Studies show that LEED-certified homes generally save less than 25 percent in heating energy over typical U.S. construction.

 

 Lower energy bills are only one of the selling points of Passivhaus, or Passive House, construction, which is becoming widespread in German speaking countries and Scandinavia. “The principal reason that people get these houses in Europe is that they are so incredibly comfortable,” says William Ryall, of Ryall Porter Sheridan Architects. “You have fresh air and humidity control all of the time and because of all the insulation, they are extraordinarily quiet in urban settings,” says Ryall...

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L-House: sustainability + modern design in Burgenland, Austria

L-House: sustainability + modern design in Burgenland, Austria | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Located on the outskirts of a small settlement in the South of Austria’s Burgenland region, L-House is surrounded by the brilliance of natural light.

This new home for a young family is harmoniously placed into the hilly landscape. The traditional and typical L-shaped floor plan of the region was developed further in an imaginative and thoughtful way advancing modern home, energy and living concepts. The client wished for a contemporary living experience that is blended into the surrounding landscape.

The result is a surprising habitat that reflects the way the family lives incorporating design quality, sustainability and functionality in everyday life. The L-House is an avant-garde architectural gem that merges the needs of it’s residents with the environment...

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A field chapel made by the hands of community...

A field chapel made by the hands of community... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Made by the hands of community - A field chapel has been built in the Odenwald. An architectural firm, 12 students from Chicago and local craftsmen realized the wooden construction.

With no funding or even a plot of land, Reverend Moser-Feesche had taken it upon himself, with the help of a local architectural firm, to build a chapel. In order to realize this nonprofit project they would assembled a small army of volunteers, recruited from as far as the US.

Under their professor's direction, 12 students from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago drew up plans for the chapel. In addition to the group of students and architecture firm, local craftsmen and the church co-operative played an instrumental role. A farmer offered the pastor a plot of land, the wood needed came in the form of donated construction timber processed at a local sawmill, and the gravel for the courtyard came from the River Main.

After just eight weeks of hard teamwork the community was bestowed with a new chapel on the aforementioned hill. The façade of the modest building is a mesh of diagonally-angled wooden planks. From a courtyard, intended as a representation of the temporal, one steps through an open foyer into the actual chapel at the base of the nine-meter-tall tower.

The interdenominational chapel provides a peaceful place of retreat for anyone who may pass by.

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Green Building Investments Shift To Second Phase: Net Zero Buildings

Green Building Investments Shift To Second Phase: Net Zero Buildings | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
The first round of green building investments have matured and investors now look towards phase two of green buildings: net-zero building construction.

Despite a tepid global economy, the green building sector continues to grow as investors look towards the next phase of green building investments. A recent report from Lux Research suggests that venture capital in green buildings, which totalled 4 billion over the past 12 years, is being directed towards net-zero buildings.

Thus the green building trend has shifted from energy efficiency to designing buildings that produce as much energy as they consume.

The report entitled “Building a Green 21st Century: Tracking Venture Investments in Green Buildings to Uncover New Opportunities” took an in-depth look at the entire green building landscape, including energy monitoring, sustainable building materials, and energy efficient lighting, to name a few...

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House by the Pond by Stelle Architects

House by the Pond by Stelle Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Stelle Architects have designed the House by the Pond in Water Mill, New York.

The overall design of the house was a direct response to an array of environmental regulations, site constraints, solar orientation and specific programmatic requirements.

The strategy was to locate a two story volume containing all of the bedrooms, running north/south along the western side of the site. An open, lofty, single story pavilion, separated by a space comprised of two large glass pivot doors, was located parallel to the street. This lower scale street front pavilion was conceived as a breezeway, connecting the light and activity of the yard and pool area to the south with the view and wildlife of the pond to the north.

The exterior materials consist of anodized aluminum doors, windows and trim, cedar and cement board siding, selected for low maintenance, modest cost, long-term durability, and sustainability. Overhangs and sunshades limit the need for summer air conditioning while allowing solar heat gain in the winter.

Specific zoning, an efficient geothermal heating and cooling system, highly energy efficient glazing and an advanced building insulation system resulted in a structure that exceeded the requirements of the energy star rating system...

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Spanish Pavilion at Floriade 2012

Spanish Pavilion at Floriade 2012 | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Designed by Pulgón Diseño studio, the approach to the project theme of “naturally diverse” highlights the importance of organic products, diversity and natural richness.

Likewise, the idea Cradle to Cradleis also present in the exhibition, and the designed spaces will allude to cycles and continuity as added and essential values in a modern concept of sustainability and of the use of natural resources...

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Forestry Center at the Edge of the Urban Fabric in Switzerland...

Forestry Center at the Edge of the Urban Fabric in Switzerland... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
The site of the forestry center extends on both sides of the 'Reuchenette' road. To facilitate it's function, the program's content focused on only one side.

Following the topography of the land, two buildings form an elongated space ending with a court for the maneuvers.

The single level building dominates the main street façade and differs, both in form and aspect, from the urban architecture. Its envelope is of untreated strips of wood, generating a vertically-oriented texture that connects with the forest structure, filtering light and external views.

The second building, on two levels, is positioned behind the first. It's covered with simple wood cladding, pierced with large windows. The ground floor houses the changing rooms, the carpentry workshop and the technical rooms, while upstairs, the administration. Located on the edge of the urban fabric between the city and the forest, the project -through its form and materiality- gives visibility to this singular institution...

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Green architecture | Beachaus II, White Rock

Green architecture | Beachaus II, White Rock | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Beachaus II is among the first independently certified sustainable homes built in the White Rock/South Surrey area which received LEED Platinum certificate from the Canadian Green Building Council (CAGBC) LEED program. The home has been carefully planned from the ground up, and it was inspected and verified through every stage of planning and construction to ensure that it meets the strict rules of the CAGBC program.

Designed by Pb Elemental architects, the 2-storey 188 square-meter (2,025 square-foot) home has 3 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, and additional large office. Beachaus II offers stunning ocean views from throughout the home as well as from the private rooftop deck. It is designed to meet the needs for active “smart” living in vibrant White Rock East Beach community. An exterior stair accessed from the living room is positioned within the exterior shroud and leads to a roof deck with gorgeous views of Semiahmoo Bay.

Beachhaus II was planned by Inhaus Development, whose motto of “live smart, not large” was used throughout the project to make it the most efficient, livable and intelligent home around. They took a truly hybrid approach in the construction, and it was inspired by the modern beachfront homes that dot the California coastline...

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In London, A Big Win For Green Building

In London, A Big Win For Green Building | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
In the London borough of Newham, where much of the Olympic Park is located, one of the greenest buildings in the world is on the rise at the Royal Docks.

The Crystal, as its known, was developed by Siemens — that global powerhouse in renewable energy tech, among other things — for the center of London’s new Green Enterprise District.

Conceived of as an ‘intelligent all electric’ building, it will serve as a showcase for innovative tech- from solar arrays (which cover the roof of the building) to heat pumps tied to geothermal wells (buried beneath the building site). The Crystal was designed to take top marks in both LEED and BREEAM certifications; no fossil fuels will be used to power the building.

The Crystal — developed by Siemens at a cost of £30 million – was designed to serve as a focal point for London’s new Green Enterprise District, which the city’s mayor, Boris Johnson, envisions as “a vibrant, international hub incubating dozens of low carbon businesses.” The District is expected to generate up to 6,000 new jobs and develop “new low carbon skills.”

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A Smart Hillside Home Incorporates Solar Orientation & Passive Ventilation

A Smart Hillside Home Incorporates Solar Orientation & Passive Ventilation | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Capturing distant views of Mt. Diablo and East Bay, this 4,400 square feet modern home is perched on a steep slope in the Californian Sonoma hills.

Vista Del Valle accentuates its location with its slightly sloping roof, under which modern interior spaces define the inhabitant’s lifestyle.  

Inside, warm spaces reconstruct the feeling of being outside, but keep the atmosphere unburdened by swift weather changes. Overhangs protect the light-flooded kitchen, dining and living spaces from overheating, while windows and glass doors welcome the cooling breeze. Clerestory windows, solar hot water heating, radiant floor heating, alongside the orientation and passive ventilation create a comfortable atmosphere without charging the bills.

Imagined as a modern oasis of comfort within natural surroundings, the residence was designed by Zimmerman and Associates, who dressed the whole house in a carefully constructed skin – horizontal cedar siding and stucco intertwine to compose a suite of volumetric spaces adapted to the existing site conditions, natural lighting and needs of a modern lifestyle.

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Sustainable Olympic stadium: a leader in the global green movement...

Sustainable Olympic stadium: a leader in the global green movement... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

With its red running tracks surrounded by black and white seats and floodlights stretching above the roof, London’s elliptically shaped Olympic Stadium resembles many other sporting venues.

But the building’s principal designer, Philip Johnson, believes it will lead a global movement towards sustainable architecture.

Mostly lightweight steel was used in the construction, the roof is made of PVC and the stadium boasts a fabric curtain, designed to minimize crosswinds. Moreover, the water collected from the roof is used to flush the toilets, while the earth embankments that surround the stadium protect the biodiversity of the site by encouraging plants to grow.

“We want to use as little material as possible,” said Johnson, of the architectural consultancy, Populous, which is headquartered in the US city of Kansas, but has offices around the world, including one in the British capital...

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