sustainable architecture
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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Housing+ by C. F. Møller Architects: Zero-energy design

Housing+ by C. F. Møller Architects: Zero-energy design | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

C. F. Møller Architects have designed a proposal for the pilot-project Housing+, for 60 zero-energy housing units on the Aalborg Waterfront. The design adhered to stringent energy goals through a combination of architectural design and user-focused technical innovation.

The Housing+ concept sets the ambitious target of a zero-energy housing scheme, which also includes the tenant’s primary household energy consumption. The complex will thus be 100% relying on renewables.

Central to the concept is the use of integrated energy-design to generate the concept of tomorrow’s housing, producing more energy than it consumes. This is achieved by optimizing the inherent passive gains of the main volume, and shaping it to take advantage of the orientation and potential for active solar energy-collection.


Visit the link for more images and details on this contemporary, green design that incorporates solar, passive strategies, and on-site renewable energy.

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Bioclimatic House in the Canary Islands, Spain

Bioclimatic House in the Canary Islands, Spain | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This bioclimatic house, by Estudio José Luis Rodríguez, is a self-sufficient structure integrated into the terrain of the Canary Islands, a landscape characterized by a continuous terracing of the extreme topography.


In response to this site, the design features a basalt stone wall that supports a light structure of plywood, galvanized steel walls and glass.

The building's orientation is determined by solar radiation; photovoltaic panels produce electricity, in order to achieve zero carbon emissions. The living area is connected to the outside with a space that is protected from sun and wind, while a wall located in the sleeping area to the north has a high thermal mass for passive temperature control.

The design also aims to reduce its ecological footprint on the use of materials and construction systems by using local materials (basalt wall insulation covered with volcanic lapilli, for example), environmentally certified materials and no harmful elements, such as VOC compounds in synthetic paints and varnishes.


View more images of this unique, contextural and contemporary green project at the link to ArchDaily's feature...

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FUCOL INGENIERIA's curator insight, April 12, 2015 10:23 AM

añada su visión ...

David Regalado's curator insight, July 3, 2015 7:47 AM

Que gran trabajo!!!! Esto es lo que queremos en las Islas Canarias;)

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H House: a modular + contemporary interpretation of traditional architecture

H House: a modular + contemporary interpretation of traditional architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Not far from Budapest, on the fringes of a forest, there stands Tamás Dévényi’s shingle covered new house. The disarmingly simple building creates generous spatial relations on the 1,5 hectare land. The proximity of the bustling city life doesn’t mean that we can not relish the convenience of nature and the separation of a farmhouse. Borrowing its form and use of materials from the Central-European peasant architecture, the building’s modular structure follows contemporary design thinking.


The requirements for a country house have changed a lot during the past hundred years, but using the old Hungarian peasant house’s archetype was a good starting point for the design in a situation where the strict local building regulations tie the architects’ freedom, according to local resources.


Read further to learn how the project team incorporated vernacular typologies to create a contemporary, modular + green farmhouse in a rural context...

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Jameson House | Foster + Partners

Jameson House | Foster + Partners | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Jameson House is a new 35-story mixed-use tower in the heart of Vancouver, and completed just at the end of last year, already the building is almost fully occupied. The project combines the restoration of heritage buildings with new construction: the lower level offices and shops tie into the existing streetscape to reinvigorate the downtown neighborhood, while the apartments above face dramatic views of the bay and create a new landmark on the skyline.

Fusing old and new, the site connects the city’s financial centre with its emerging creative hub, and the scheme integrates two 1920s Beaux Arts structures: the entire internal double-height volume of the A-listed Ceperley Rounsfell Building has been returned to its original configuration and the facade of the B-listed Royal Financial Building has been retained....


Sir Norman Foster said: “Vancouver has a spectacular location, surrounded by mountains and the sea. The design makes the most of the city’s fantastic natural setting, with balconies and deep bay windows looking out towards the landscape. Jameson House further develops a number of key themes that have been integral to our work for many years. The project combines restoration with new construction; it is high-density and mixed-use, offering a sustainable model for urban living; and it demonstrates innovation, both in its evolution of the high-rise building and its progressive environmental agenda.”

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Two Sustainable Homes in Luque: In harmony with the environment...

Two Sustainable Homes in Luque: In harmony with the environment... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

In this project, the realization of a living space that suits the topography, the vegetation, and the tropical climate required the knowledge gained from the study of vernacular architecture. 


The “Culata Jovai” or “House of Confronted Rooms” is a bioclimatic solution to incorporating traditional ways of living harmoniously with the environment in Paraguay. It constitutes a base typology for a reinterpretation of the vernacular, according to new functional programs, needs of symbolic representation and new technologies, framed in a sustainable project.

With the inclusion of green roof, the original space of vegetation displaced by the construction was recovered, also reducing the heat gain due to the thermal inertia of the underground spaces, therefore reducing greatly the conventional energy consumption of homes.


View more images of this unique sustainable home at the article link...

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Brazilian architecture bringing the outdoors in...

Brazilian architecture bringing the outdoors in... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
The owners of this stunning Brazilian abode had as their top design priority the incorporation of a covered outdoor living area.

StudioMK27 architects served their request up in spades, designing the house with a large L-shaped space encompassing the living room, tv room and and an extension of the kitchen, all opening out onto the garden and pool. Sliding doors are cleverly concealed in the walls, giving a sense of complete immersion into the tropical gardens and pool area and enabling the owners to enjoy the fantastic São Paulo climate...

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Punch Digital 's curator insight, June 23, 2015 9:48 PM

This Sao Paulo build serves as an inspiration into how far housing designs have come and where they are going. The way in which design focuses on the outdoor and immersing the living rooms onto the outdoor area. 


For a custom home design on your Melbourne property is important that you take inspirations from designs being produced worldwide.


Seeing custom designs like this is what drives our team at Luxury Living Homes to create and deliver on your dream home ideas.

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The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain...

The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Rock House replaces an older building at the site and had to be well adjusted to the terrain, both in terms of shape, scale, material and color. The house and terraces are partly built upon existing stone walls, the parts of the walls which are new are made of stones from the blasting at the site. The low elongated volume is cut into to allow for wind shielded outdoor areas, embraced by the house itself. These cuts also bring down the scale of the building, and together with the local variations of the section, make the building relate to the surrounding cliff formations.

On the outer perimeter of terraces and pool, a glass fence also protects against wind, but allows for maximum view. The house is clad with Kebony wood, a sustainable process of treating the wood to allow for good durability towards the exposure to salt water...

 

View the link for more great images of the Rock House...

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Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The goal for this project was to provide a direct relationship with the dramatic archipelago landscape and to create a simple platform which would offer several diverse readings of the relationship between space and nature. Conceived as a light-weight construction in wood and glass and located in Stockholm’s outer archipelago, this summer house was built within the specific conditions prevailing on the island.

Without any car access, all materials had to be brought by boat from the mainland. Wood was chosen throughout the design in order to provide simplicity of construction and to minimize difficulties with heavy transportation.

The horizontal character of the black-stained exterior relates to the verticality of the island’s tall pines, and mirrored views of the Baltic Sea. The geometry of the plan is generated by the specifics of the site; the house sits on a flat surface between two rocky outcrops, and is oriented simultaneously towards the sun in south and towards sea views in the west. With smaller rooms placed behind, the three large social areas of the house open up to the terrace and provide an open platform, criss-crossed by sliding glass...

 

Visit the article link for more images, as well as additional details on the sustainable strategies incorporated into the design and construction of this modern home...

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Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture

Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Located in rolling hillsides of Carmel, California, the Caterpillar House is a 2-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom dwelling that implements sustainable features and strategies for minimal development impact.


Feldman Architecture gave the client a home that connects seamlessly with the outdoors, in the form of a modern ranch with strong horizontal lines.

The house is quite literally made from the ground it sits on, with repurposed dirt from the site being used in the building of the walls. The “rammed earth walls” help keep the temperature steady because they act as a thermal mass. The house also utilizes natural ventilation to keep it cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

The roof integrates photovoltaic panels that produce all the required energy, and have been carefully integrated into the design...


View more imagery of the first LEED Platinum Custom Home on the California Central Coast and read the project description at Feldman Architecture.

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Stripe House: A beautiful, efficient live/work townhouse in the Netherlands

Stripe House: A beautiful, efficient live/work townhouse in the Netherlands | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Stripe House is an energy efficient and naturally daylit home in Leiden, The Netherlands and was designed by local firm, GAAGA. Encased in a handmade plaster facade and brightly daylit from a host of windows, the compact home doubles as an office and is very energy efficient by design.


Sited on a corner lot near a park, the home does its best to make the best of the compact plot. Three stories tall, the home creates space with vertical floor area, but still retains a small garden space from which to enjoy the exterior and the neighborhood, also providing a soft transition from public to private space as well as distance from the neighboring houses.

The ground floor is used as an office, while the first and second floors are for the family. The first floor living space has an open living/kitchen floor plan, and two bedrooms and a bath are located on the top floor. A void between the living space and the bedrooms creates a connection via operable shutters.

Large windows on the the three open sides of the home are oriented towards interesting views and fill the bright white interior with natural daylight. The exterior is very tactile with a beautiful handcrafted plaster facade created with linear molds.

Beyond daylighting, the Stripe house is also a very sustainable house that scores well in several energy performance and environmental index calculations and labels- making it an efficient and beautiful example of innovative green design.


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Sustainable Modernism: House in Regensburg

Sustainable Modernism: House in Regensburg | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Building a green home, while increasingly popular in recent years, isn't a completely new concept, and the House in Regensburg by Thomas Herzog, built in 1977, still resonates today as a unique and beautiful example of thoughtful, site-responsive architecture.


Elegant in its simplicity, the design employs key sustainable principles, including passive heating and cooling, appropriate material selection and responsive building form, all of which enable the structure to have minimal development impact while maintaining a high degree of efficiency- the result of an integrated approach to site, technology, and design.

Herzog's House in Regensburg is not only a beautiful example of modern design, but also a testament to the fact that creativity is not compromised by sustainability. In fact, creativity is enhanced by this type of contextual and innovative thinking, making for a project that is not only green, but timeless and visually engaging, in both concept and execution.

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Jonathan Belisle's comment, September 28, 2012 3:23 PM
I really like this article. !
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Broad Sustainable Building To Start World's Tallest Prefab in November

Broad Sustainable Building To Start World's Tallest Prefab in November | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
TreeHugger has been following the progress of Broad Sustainable Building's prefabricated towers, including their proposal for a 220 storey tower that would accommodate 100,000 people. It is a building system that is "Taller, Greener, Faster, Cheaper". I noted in June that a site had been chosen and that construction would be starting in November.

Wired Magazine picks up the story with an interview of the founder and chairman of Broad, Zhang Yue, and some great illustrations that explain how the construction process works...

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The Crystal: London's new sustainable development hub & one of Britain's greenest buildings

The Crystal: London's new sustainable development hub & one of Britain's greenest buildings | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Electronics giant Siemens recently unveiled the Crystal, a £30m project in east London that aims to promote sustainable urban development in the capital.
The structure, which stands on the waterfront at the Royal Victoria Docks, covers more than 6,300 square metres and takes its place as one of Britain’s greenest buildings, having been built to achieve top scores in both the BREEAM and LEED rankings for energy efficient complexes.
Inside is Siemens’ Centre of Competence Cities, a team made up of urban sustainability experts, as well as an exhibition on the future of cities across the world.
The mayor of London, Boris Johnson, was there to officially launch the building, and said, “The futuristic Crystal is a fantastic new landmark for London which has breathed new life into the historic Royal Docks.” and noted that “Siemens’ investment is a great boost to our ambitious plans to redevelop swathes of former industrial land in order to bring jobs to the capital.”

The hub of this summer’s Olympic Games, the Olympic Stadium in Stratford, is only five miles down the road from the Crystal, and the London mayor made reference to the successful games, saying that the new development is another step forward in east London’s “rebirth”...

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alexandrine champiot's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:25 AM

Le long du front de mer « Royal Victoria Docks » dans l’est de Londres l’entreprise Siemens a inauguré un centre d’exposition. Une inauguration faite par le maire de Londres ainsi que par le secrétaire d'État pour les communautés et le gouvernement local. Ce centre d’exposition abrite une exposition sur l’avenir des villes à travers le monde. Pour tous, ce bâtiment est une infrastructure fantastique qui insuffle une nouvelle image aux docks de Londres.
Après les Jeux Olympiques, ce centre d’exposition dénommé Crystal va participer au renouveau de l’est de Londres. Une construction qui est inscrite dans les préoccupations pour l’environnement et pour une ville durable. Ainsi, l’intégration dans la planification urbaine du concept de durabilité et une moindre consommation en carbone sont d’une importance cruciale. C’est dans cette perspective que le Crystal accueille la conférence pour la planification de l’habitat urbain des Nations Unies.



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Living Within Nature: A Contemporary Farm House in Sweden

Living Within Nature: A Contemporary Farm House in Sweden | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This house on the west coast of Sweden is a family retreat and is a contemporary interpretation of the vernacular Swedish farmhouse, while living in close contact with nature.


The house is clad with untreated wood on the outside that will turn grey over time. The inside of the house is more delicate. The large living room / kitchen can be opened up with large sliding glazed doors so the inside becomes part of the outside.

It's considered a "'super-normal" house that is both modern and traditional at the same time.


Visit the link for more photos of this beautiful and contextual project...

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Sustainable Innovation at Gardens By The Bay, Singapore: World Building of the Year

Sustainable Innovation at Gardens By The Bay, Singapore: World Building of the Year | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Much of the environmental control is achieved through passive means, before resorting to less efficient, active systems such as air conditioning. Fresh air filters through a desiccant, then to conventional chillers. As the desiccant extracts moisture, it also cools the air inside. But to keep the desiccant functioning, energy is needed to remove the accumulated moisture. This is where sustainable technologies come in: An on-site biomass boiler—fueled entirely with green waste from the city’s national parks—and hot air collected from the top of the glasshouses provide sufficient energy to cool the conservatories.

 

“The result is not an experimental building, but its ventilation strategy has an experimental component,” Finch said. “In a globalized environment, there is so much interest in how we deal with density and this combination of urbanism with a garden that is both an attraction and nature is a wonderful solution. If they can cool these glasshouses through natural cooling, we should ask why it can’t be done in other buildings?”


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Stacy Mata's curator insight, March 8, 8:34 AM
I mean can anything get better than a flower dome?!? Well at first I though no, but it be actually seeing the flowers in the building thriving in its natural habitat. But, hey, this is a stride towards conservation, awareness and beauty. All things we need in the world, oh, and passive design of course!
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Center for Solar Energy & Hydrogen Research in Stuttgart

Center for Solar Energy & Hydrogen Research in Stuttgart | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The new research building in Stuttgart is designed on a grid for a highly flexible workplace that serves as a dynamic framework for ongoing research activities. The Center for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research comprises offices, laboratories, meeting and conference facilities.

“The grid structure of the research centre ensures a high degree of mobility and freedom to change and expand the building”, explains Design Director Louis Becker, Henning Larsen Architects. “The building has a rational design and is organised in modules. 

Carefully integrated into the surrounding context, the building features various heights that relate to the city and adjacent buildings. The building will create a new, distinctive entrance to Stuttgarter Engineering Park and provide an insight into the ongoing research.


Read the complete article for details on the sustainable strategies and technologies utilzied in the design of this flexible, adaptable and green research building...

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Ecologia Montréal: a contemporary LEED Platinum home by Gervais Fortin

Ecologia Montréal: a contemporary LEED Platinum home by Gervais Fortin | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Ecologia Montréal, designed by Gervais Fortin, is the first single dweling home in Montreal, Canada aiming for a Platinum LEED certification.

The owner, in collaboration of the Ecologia Foundation, had the objective to reduce the home's ecological footprint by using healthy, local and non-toxic materials. The team demonstrated that it’s possible to build an ecological house without sacrificing good, contemporary design. All the materials were hand-picked from the most ecoresponsible suppliers of Quebec and featured a combination of exposed beams, large windows and an inner courtyard, creating a cozy and modern living space.

In addition to utilizing a geothermal system, he structure of the house is built with insulating concrete forms, mostly constituted of 100% recycled materials. As for the concrete used for the structure and as thermal mass, concrete contains 39% recycled materials. Ideal in an urban setting, a green roof completes it all.

Ecologia Montréal is the first house in Quebec to integrate the BioGeometry™ science, to control electromagnetic fields, to consider the energy of the earth and to infuse domestic water. The combination of all these factors harmonize the emotional, vital and spiritual levels of the home and its occupants...

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Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Madrid-based architect Juan Herreros sees this no-frills holiday home in rural Spain as an animal occupying but not transforming the landscape.

Casa Garoza – a tiny, elegant shed in the scrubby Spanish countryside near Ávila – sits clearly within the latter camp: a modular anti-villa that is both austere and sophisticated. Derived from continuing research into modular buildings at Juan Herreros’ Madrid-based office, it was commissioned by a city-based designer-artist couple who wanted a no-frills weekend retreat. It’s a pre-fab, but in its modesty and scale, a far cry from the recent American trend for “designer” pre-fabs – reinvented double-wides for the Ikea generation.

Sitting on steel legs that are bolted to the rocks on site – without the need for any excavation – the house, Herreros says, is like an animal that occupies the landscape without transforming it. The ground continues uninterrupted beneath the building, suggesting it could be lifted up and leave no trace, and there is no landscaping apart from a simple, raised deck on one side. It comprises eight modules, which took four months to build in the factory (though Herreros estimates this could have been halved), and a day to install on site...

 

Read the complete story on this modular + innovative project at the link.

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Luxury Apartment Living Goes Green...

Luxury Apartment Living Goes Green... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
In urban areas across the country, young professionals are clamoring for close-in, transit-oriented apartments that are as high-performance as they are luxurious.

In fact, nearly one-fifth of them will pay more for a green residence, according to a recent survey, and developers are responding with posh rental communities that encompass energy efficiency, healthy indoor air, and a walkable lifestyle.

Visit the link for six recently completed projects that provide sustainable, stylish multifamily living...

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Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen

Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Canadian architects Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen have slightly altered the mathematical elements of a geodesic dome to form a new modular pavilion.


By using different sized triangular frames with both spherical and perpendicular surfaces, a new lattice form was birthed from that of a traditional geodesic dome. The result is a method of construction that allows surfaces to be extruded, scaled, pushed and pulled while maintaining logic.
Through this altered composition, small niches and crevices opened. Steel footings connect the wooden frame, made of locally-sourced pine. Steel nodes were made to fit standard rafter sizes, making the whole design movable.
The façade's curved surfaces are covered with recycled wood panels, creating opaque faces. Perpendicular surfaces made of PVC film allow light to enter while opening views to the outside. The project was commissioned by BL (Denmark Public Housing) for the Peoples Meeting in Denmark.

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Sculptural architecture blurs the division between built form and landscape...

Sculptural architecture blurs the division between built form and landscape... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Barwon Heads in Victoria is undergoing a period of significant change. Heritage restrictions currently protect older fishing shacks whilst the remainder of the seaside town is progressively being redeveloped.

The architecture now emerging is significantly contributing to the evolution of this small coastal township. The interesting circular building form of this house emerged from the architects Jackson Clements Burrows exploring circular forms, which resulted in a circular skylight over the first floor living areas and the overall shape of the house mirroring and immersing the structure into the Ti-tree dominated landscape.

The house is wrapped in a skin of vertical cedar battens, which not only provide privacy and solar protection but also blur the division between the built form and the landscape...

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House DS: a minimalist extension to a Belgian farmhouse...

House DS: a minimalist extension to a Belgian farmhouse... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

House DS is a minimalist extension to a farmhouse residence in Belgium and a beautiful example of residential restoration, preservation and reuse...

A typical Belgian farmhouse, known as a ‘fernette’ inspired this addition to House DS in Destelbergen, Belgium. Architects Graux & Baeyens addressed the client’s request of ensuring the addition would provide ‘spacious, bright and contemporary living’ and molded the idea of 4 rectilinear volumes as extensions of the existing building, creating a stark contrast between old and new, past and present. A fifth volume in the form of a pool house also serves as a shed for additional storage.

The proportions of the new volumes, the unobtrusive appearance of its minimalist interiors and the well-designed layout of the spaces that connect the two structures present an elegant way of two styles coexisting.

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Modular materiality at House K by Auerbach Halevy Architects

Modular materiality at House K by Auerbach Halevy Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A unique example of sustainable and modular design influenced and reflective of the vernacular and local tradition, while incorporating modern materials and concepts...


In a rural area in Israel, Auerbach-Halevy has designed a distinctive house.  The design is a concrete block, and the north elevation facing the street and both side facades seem completely opaque, yet they are not alienated to their environment.
The entire structure is covered with a uniform system of prefabricated exposed concrete panels, which are integrated with heavy wood Latticework – A reminder to the traditional oriental element – the eastern trellis (“mashrabia”). The combination of materials and distribution arrangements add warmth, and ease the rigid system.


In HOUSE K the pre-cast concrete panels participate in the interior design, dictate the rhythm in the house and affect its scale.
The unique appearance of the house expresses locality, and by combining the exposed concrete elements with the trellis wooden work, creates a unified and coherent language. This combination of elements transcends beyond the contrasting and complementary nature of the materials, resolves the symbolic collision produced by the components, and therefore creating a unity between tradition Arab style and modernist building.

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Greening Japan: sustainable trends in architecture + reconstruction

Greening Japan: sustainable trends in architecture + reconstruction | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Japan’s historic architecture was among the most sustainable and environmentally friendly on the planet. Think of a traditional machiya (merchant’s house) or even a palace, such as the Katsura Imperial Villa in Kyoto; made of local materials such as wood, tatami, paper.
The 20th century’s rush to modernize favored new technologies over tradition, and Japan became one of the most exciting architectural landscapes on the globe. There are few environments as adventurous: a place where microhouses are built on microscopic building sites, where skyscrapers rise on seismic quake lines and where material and form are pushed to new heights- it is a constantly changing architectural landscape... 

But the price for this constant reinvention is often environmental; with global economic uncertainty and recent disasters, Japan has had to rethink how it wants to go forward. It could be the beginning of a quiet architectural revolution, as architects and urban planners – as well as the public – question architectural ideals since 1945 and ask: how can this be done better?


Now, with reconstruction beginning, the need and desire to find innovative and sustainable ways of building is growing. Japanese architecture has traditionally prized and worked in response to nature, so it's no surprise that architects are not only looking to new green technology but also back to Japan’s architectural traditions; a shoji screen can be as relevant as a solar panel in sustainable architecture...


Visit the link for the complete article for case studies, example projects and more images that address this new phase of architecture and sustainable development in Japan.

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Eco-Friendly + Energy Conscious Architecture on the Cliffs of Scotland

Eco-Friendly + Energy Conscious Architecture on the Cliffs of Scotland | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

There are no boundaries when it comes to developing extensive architectural projects that focus on alternative energy sources and environmentally friendly materials. Scotland’s climate had a lot to do with completing the project, named The Houl. The team of architects stated that their work is so impressive because it’s based on “an energy conscious design”.

The house was built by taking into account the benefits of Scotland’s windy weather. The roof is sloping at different angles and the main reason for choosing such an unusual shape for it, is the summer sun. The house makes use of natural materials, such as hardwood for the inside floors and bricks for the side façade. The Houl keeps a cozy appearance, the inside walls are painted in a luminous white, making the place more spacious and relaxing. With a stunning panoramic view, this house is simply delightful. Utterly immersed into an isolated spot, The Houl makes its inhabitants feel the sweet scent of freedom. A breezy, ventilated place for those who prefer the solitary landscapes...

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