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design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Safdie Architects Design Glass “Air Hub” for Singapore Changi Airport

Safdie Architects Design Glass “Air Hub” for Singapore Changi Airport | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

biodSafdie Architects revealed plans for an all-glass, spherical “air hub” that will be built at the center of the Singapore’s Changi Airport, the world’s sixth busiest airport. The biodome was presented as a “new paradigm” for international airports.

“This project redefines and reinvents what airports are all about,” said architect Moshe Safdie. “Our goal was to bring together the duality of a vibrant marketplace and a great urban park side-by-side in a singular and immersive experience. The component of the traditional mall is combined with the experience of nature, culture, education, and recreation, aiming to provide an uplifting experience. By drawing both visitors and local residents alike, we aim to create a place where the people of Singapore interact with the people of the world.”

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A New Culture Hub in the Netherlands Exemplifies Dutch Architecture

A New Culture Hub in the Netherlands Exemplifies Dutch Architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Crowned with three cantilevered structures, this hub unites the city library, regional archives, and arts spaces in a stellar example of Dutch architecture.

The Eemhuis, designed by Neutelings Riedijk Architects of Rotterdam, never quite sits still. There is a movement of people, a play of lines and an interweaving of functions. This lively energy, combined with a strong urban presence, befits the building’s role as the new cultural heart of Amersfoort.

The layered exterior reveals the 16,000-square-metre centre’s stacked program, organized organically by purpose. The library resides on the open lower floors, while the arts school is perched on top, with each department – theatre and dance, visual arts and music – housed in one of the cantilevered metal structures. Anchoring the new community hub are the archives at the building’s core.

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Two-Sided Railway Station in Rotterdam's Fabric

Two-Sided Railway Station in Rotterdam's Fabric | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Rotterdam Centraal Station’s relationship to the existing urban fabric called for different treatments of its north and south facades.


The commission for a new central railway station in Rotterdam had multiple clients, and complex program, encompassing the north and south station halls, train platforms, concourse, commercial space, offices, outdoor public space, and more. Finally, there was the station’s relationship to Rotterdam itself: while city leaders envisioned the south entrance as a monumental gateway to the city, the proximity of an historic neighborhood to the north necessitated a more temperate approach.

Team CS, a collaboration among Benthem Crouwel Architekten, MVSA Meyer en Van Schooten Architecten, and West 8, achieved a balancing act with a multipart facade conceived over the project’s decade-long gestation. On the south, Rotterdam Centraal Station trumpets its presence with a swooping triangular stainless steel and glass entryway, while to the north a delicate glass-house exterior defers to the surrounding urban fabric.

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Urban Think Tank Introduces the Empower Shack to the Slums of Western Cape

Urban Think Tank Introduces the Empower Shack to the Slums of Western Cape | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

International studio Urban Think Tank are currently exhibiting the ‘empower shack‘ in zurich. The project is developed as an adapting response to urban informality, offering not only improved housing but a strategy that allows the citizens of self-built urban communities to dynamically structure their urban environment as an instant response to their needs.

An economical protoype two story metal-clad modular structure can be self-built. Each home is allotted a determined amount of space that allows the structure to expand as the inhabitants need it, still fitting within a more organized framework. Transsolar has also made it possible to incorporate solar energy on every rooftop.

The ongoing project is intended to alleviate the housing crisis in informal settlements during a time when the government has begun incrementally improving the housing situation.

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David Week's curator insight, August 12, 6:01 PM

Architects still don't get it. Poor people don't need their designs. They aren't poor because they don't have good housing. They don't have good housing because they are poor. And given access to funds, they will build houses that are twice as appropriate for half the cost (at most) of any architect-designed "intervention".

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A Parisian Restaurant Design with a Pixelated Green Facade

A Parisian Restaurant Design with a Pixelated Green Facade | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Architect Stephane Malka’s striking facade proposal for a Parisian restaurant creates an unusual site, sure to stand out in the urban setting of the city. Amidst a city of man-made concrete and glass structures could rise a building essentially comprised of an organically growing “forest.

Malka, who has experience in urban landscaping, created a green facade that wraps around a glass enclosure and is composed of raw wooden blocks arranged in a patchy, pixelating pattern. The uneven surface creates spaces for plant life to grow, spilling flourishing green plants and foliage down the building.

The textured wooden facade, which seems to actively move inward to completely engulf the glass skin, stops to reveal an expansive view of the restaurant’s interior.

Malka’s work presents passersby and restaurant customer with with the interesting paradox of nature abundantly flourishing in an urban environment...

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Rebecca Ashley Martinez's curator insight, June 8, 2013 2:29 PM

Architect Stephane Malka's work of art an urban forest....

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This Lisbon Home Has A Green Facade That “Breathes”

This Lisbon Home Has A Green Facade That “Breathes” | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Sustainability in architecture reveals itself in many forms, some more subtle or hidden than others. It’s much more complicated an issue than just green lawning your building, but sometimes that’s just what you need to get your message across.


The House in Travessa do Patrocínio by RA\\ does just that. The narrow townhouse is situated in the center of Lisbon, in a neighborhood with little access to green spaces. To compensate for this, the architects draped the house with lush green facades that cover 100 square-meters of wall space.

The facades are integral components to the architecture, and are planted with approximately 4,500 plants sourced from 25 different local varieties, all of which require little maintenance. The result is a vertical garden that functions as an urban “lung” within the pavement-heavy area, helping to rid the residential street of excess noise, carbon, and other pollutants floating about.

Though small and humble in proportion,  the architects hope that the house is an “example of sustainability for the city of Lisbon,” a new urban model applicable at all scales of building.

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, March 25, 2013 12:07 PM

The footprint of this home is relatively modest, the green statment it makes is bold and beautiful. The green wall the architects say functions as an urban “lung” within the pavement-heavy area, helping to rid the residential street of excess noise, carbon, and other pollutants floating about. Read on....

Mary H Goudie's curator insight, August 26, 2013 12:53 PM

Just round the corner from my apartment in Campo de Ourique, one of this city's little inner residential villages! I check out the progress of the vertical plantation once in a while and wish I could have my apartment clad in the same. Come up & see it for yourselves - just grab a 28 or 25 antique tram, both pass right below my window. 

Brett Christie-Taylor's curator insight, March 24, 4:08 PM

A beautiful example of a home that is embracing sustainable engineering and something that we should all be trying to do.

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Halle am Wasser Art Centre: a self-sufficient urban complex in Berlin

Halle am Wasser Art Centre: a self-sufficient urban complex in Berlin | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The new Arts Centre "Halle am Wasser" by the Berlin and London based practice Pott Architects is part of a self-sufficient urban accommodation complex featuring an Arts Campus, Marina, flats, offices and restaurants.


A key element of the development of the whole area was the transformation of an old derelict warehouse into an extensive art gallery, a cultural hub for the whole district. The art forum takes the shape of a folded sculptural element, with a membrane streching across the outside of the existing building, transforming it into a home for all forms of art with 6 main galleries varying in size. The canopy covering allows natural light inside and significantly improves the appearance of the warehouse. The steel skeleton of the building is successfully adapted to accommodate the flexible open-plan gallery spaces that can be easily adjusted according to the requirements of the artists...

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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, February 8, 2013 2:47 AM

Self Sufficient os a good approach, even if i think future buildings are not mandatory auto sufficient. But shall they have this approach with an index and ataxes compensation in large means, we will give a hugh step towards sustainability.

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

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Pop-up stars: temporary contemporary architecture

Pop-up stars: temporary contemporary architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
From huge temporary stadia to tiny transitory event spaces, pop-up architecture fulfils many roles and comes in many guises.

In some cases the very latest technologies are used to engineer complex structures, while in others a readymade approach using scavenged materials is more appropriate. Several noteworthy examples include semi-permanent structures, container architecture and event pavilions.


This article examines some key pop-up projects that are designed to make the most of their short lifespans...

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Prague’s newest eco building and its impressive green roof

Prague’s newest eco building and its impressive green roof | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
A team of architects have designed a series of townhomes which are (wait for it...) inserted into an artificial hillside. You'll see from the photos that this make-believe hillside is covered by a unique carpet of grass.

The complex is located near the historic Prague city centre and is called the “Central Park Praha (Prague)”. The concept was designed by A96 Architects and AED Project. According to the architects, the residence will have its own 1.5-hectare park. It also happens to be right next to one of the largest parks in Prague, Parukáøka.

The layout of the complex was inspired by the natural environment, transforming its sharp features into a park through an artificial green embankment.

“The embankment is actually a terraced building with a green roof and façade. The compact green façade is used as the roof of two-storey townhouses interrupted by balcony frames playfully distorting the layout by connecting several smaller units into one larger unit...

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The High Line

The High Line | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
The official Web site of the High Line and Friends of the High Line...

 

What do you do with an outdated elevated train line running through a crowded neighborhood in New York City?  In the 1980s, residents called for the demolition of the line as the eyesore since it was blamed for economic struggles of the community and increased criminal activity.  Unfortunately demolition is extremely expensive.  However, this one particular abandoned line has recently been converted into an elevated green space that has economically revitalized the local real estate.  Find out more about this innovated park and project.


Via Seth Dixon
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E8 building

E8 building | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
The lot must define the most significant western visual boundary. Also, it is the natural background of the boulevard’s urban axis, the green space that unifies the whole of the Álava Technology Park, since its beginning.

The buildings are linked in a to their natural surroundings., and their geometry frames the views towards the hillside. In the North building this opening is achieved through an open entrance atrium, which enhances the presence of the hillside forest, with the use of a frontal overhang that liberates the main façade. In the South building, the landscape views are achieved through the overhangs on its sides.
The double façade provides the buildings with an air mattress that increases the thermal insulation by reducing losses in winter and producing air circulation in the summer. Thus the air conditioning requirements are minimized and save great amounts of energy...

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21st Century Roof for Molinete Roman Ruins - eVolo

21st Century Roof for Molinete Roman Ruins - eVolo | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The building is essentially a cover protecting the remains of a Roman assembly (thermal baths, forum and domus) in the archaeological site of Molinete Park in Cartagena, Spain.
This cover is certainly another piece in the urban area of Cartagena whose main architectural challenge is to reconcile very different architectures, from the roman times, passing through baroque to contemporary architectures, making them vibrate together in the neighborhood. It is a transition element, between very different city conditions, in size and structure, from the dense city centre to the slope park.
The primary goal of the project is to respect the existing remains, using a long-span structure, which requires the least amount of support for lifting the cover. The intervention unifies all the remains in a single space, allowing a continuous perception of the whole site. The cover also generates a new urban facade in the partition wall.
The project also pursues a sense of lightness and is conceived as an element that allows light. The inner layer is built with a modular system of corrugated multiwall translucent polycarbonate sheets. The outer layer, constructed with perforated steel plates, qualifies the incidence of light and gives a uniform exterior appearance.
Besides to the steel structure, the project proposes an elevated walkway parallel to the street. It is a very light structure hanging from the steel beams. Conceived as a glass box, with a faceted, partially visible geometry, it builds the street façade and allows a view of the ruins from three meters height. It is also accessible for disabled visitors. This high path permits an overall vision of the roman remains.

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Ryue Nishizawa’s Vertical Garden House in Tokyo

Ryue Nishizawa’s Vertical Garden House in Tokyo | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Designed for a tiny urban lot, the narrow building by Nishizawa might easily be mistaken for some sort of mysterious vertical garden. “With no true facade, all that emerges in the anonymous front are the from bottom to top: the living room and kitchen on the ground floor, followed by the first bedroom on the floor above, moving on to a bathroom, then to a second bedroom, and finally to the roof-terrace, where a tiny room is located, used either as a guest room or extra storage.

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Rebel Architecture: Working on Water

Rebel Architecture: Working on Water | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi is no stranger to global starchitecture, having joined OMA in 2001. In 2010, he took off to establish his own office, NLÉ – which means ‘at home’ in Yoruba, the language of Africa’s first truly urbanized population. ‘I am constantly inspired by solutions we discover in everyday life in the world’s developing cities,’ he says. The documentary focuses on his efforts in the slums of Port Haricourt.

Although Makoko was founded as a fishing village in the 18th century, it now has a population of over 85,000. Rising sea level and stronger torrential rains mean that the settlement is under constant threat, whereas Port Harcourt waterfront is being eyed by real-estate developers.

Working against forced clearance and displacement of the slum’s residents, the architects at NLÉ have instead proposed to replace the urban tissue with floating structures. The first prototype, the Makoko Floating School, uses a series of barrels and an A-frame timber structure to create an educational space for 100 local children, and made worldwide headlines when it was photographed by Iwan Baan in 2013.

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Hong Kong Design Institute: Inspired by Utopian Floating Cities of the 60s

Hong Kong Design Institute: Inspired by Utopian Floating Cities of the 60s | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
A new campus-on-stilts by Coldefy & Associés Architectes Urbanistes is inspired by the utopian floating cities of the 1960s.

The new campus of the Hong Kong Design Institute, by the French architecture firm Coldefy & Associés Architectes Urbanistes (CAAU), consists of a glazed platform that seems to float atop four stout legs. The building is edged on three sides by clusters of residential towers, against which this platform seems to hover at half height. On the remaining side, it looks across a park on to Clear Water Bay.

Raising the structure allowed for a dynamic continuation of the urban grid. The building stands on a podium, on which there are sports facilities and gardens; down at street level is an open plaza.

Coldefy's design is influenced by the "floating architecture" of the Hungarian-born French architect and urban planner, Yona Friedman. In the early 1960s Friedman proposed a "mobile city", a series of moveable megastructures suspended on a grid of stilts so that they left a minimal footprint...

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Rotterdam Centraal Station

Rotterdam Centraal Station | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Team CS designed Rotterdam Centraal Station, one of the most important transport hubs in The Netherlands, as a building that tries to create a dialogue between the different urban characters of the north and south side.


Natural light and warmth and modern aesthetics are important elements in the design. The platform roof is transparent, and upon entering the bright high hall, the traveler gets an overview of the entire complex and a view to the trains that are waiting at the platforms.

The esplanade in front of the station is a continuous public space, with parking for 750 cars and 5,200 bicycles located underground. The tram station is moved to the east side of the station, so the platforms broaden the square. Bus, tram, taxi and the area for short-term parking are integrated into the existing urban fabric and do not constitute barriers. The red stone of the station floor continues into the forecourt, merging the station with the city. Pedestrian and cycling routes are pleasant and safe and arriving travelers now have dignified entrance to the city, free from traffic.

Find more at the link...

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De Rotterdam: OMA Completes Mixed-Use 'Vertical City'

De Rotterdam: OMA Completes Mixed-Use 'Vertical City' | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

OMA today marks the completion of De Rotterdam, a mixed-use, 160,000m2 slab-tower conceived as a ‘vertical city’ on the river Maas. The three stacked and interconnecting towers rise 44 floors to a height of 150 meters and span a width of over 100 meters. Nevertheless, the building is exceptionally compact, with a mix of programs organized into distinct but overlapping blocks of commercial office space, residential apartments, hotel and conference facilities, restaurants and cafes. 


“Efficiency has been a central design parameter from day one. The extreme market forces at play throughout the course of the project, far from being a design constraint, have in fact reinforced our original concept. The result is a dense, vibrant building for the city.”

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Cat Perrin's curator insight, November 27, 2013 3:09 AM

Sustainable architecture, and sustainable constructions, and sustainable trading. Everything should be thought on a sustainable point of vue.

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Jåttå Vocational School by Henning Larsen Architects

Jåttå Vocational School by Henning Larsen Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Jåttå Vocational School is designed as a small ‘town in town’ featuring a vibrant double-high central street surrounded by individual ‘urban quarters’, each with their own teaching environments and lecture rooms. 

The heart of the school – the central street comprising the main hall, canteen and resource centre – forms an active and vibrant gathering point offering a view of the green patios and roof landscape of the building as well as the workshops and study areas. A sequence of ramps and stairs lead from the entrance further up through the building and through the lecture hall, all the way up to the roof landscape offering a view of the scenery and fjord.

With its minimalist, floating architecture, the School forms the entrance to Stavanger’s new urban quarter by the fjord. The concentrated design enhances the way the building interacts with its surroundings and underlines its proximity and transparency. The double high windows allow daylight into the building, stimulating the learning process....

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Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing

Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Light Park is a skyscraper that hovers over the streets of Beijing like a giant airship. Architects Ting Xu and Yiming Chen have conceived the future of high-rises to be a conglomerate of mega-structures that make up for the shortage of urban open spaces on the ground by lifting them up in the air.


The Light Park skyscraper is lifted off the ground with a helium-filled balloon, and it uses solar energy for propulsion, enabling it to function as a non-polluting transportation deck as well as a floating urban park. The technology is based on existing helium balloon designs, using solar-powered propellers, airbags and atmospheric pressure for takeoff and cruise flight. Solar power is utilized to power the uses below, with translucent solar panels located on the top of the aircraft. In order to avoid additional weight and decrease wind resistance, the skyscraper uses a cable-suspended structure to attach the slabs to the mushroom-like cap. The planting slabs are irrigated with rainwater collected on the large cap surface and are distributed in a way which allows maximum exposure to sunlight on each level...


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Amber Qureshi's curator insight, April 8, 2013 1:19 PM

Daaamnnn :O 

Noor Fatima's comment, April 9, 2013 10:01 AM
incredibleeeee
Amber Qureshi's comment, April 12, 2013 3:12 AM
Ikr :D
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Biophilic Design at the High Line: 510 West 22nd Street by COOKFOX Architects

Biophilic Design at the High Line: 510 West 22nd Street by COOKFOX Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

COOKFOX designs a biophilic office building along the High Line that looks to connect with nature and serve as the next version of the sustainable workplace...


While One Bryant Park—the firm’s groundbreaking Platinum LEED tower—distinguished itself on the city skyline with a glacial, shard-like glass profile- 510 West 22nd Street responds directly to the neighboring elevated-rail-turned-urban-park and seeks to connect tenants with the landscape.

The building’s glass curtain wall has dark metal mullions that reflect the High Line’s steel structure and brise-soleils that reduce glare and mitigate heat. The building also has a High Line of its own with a rooftop garden, complete with mobile planters on train tracks.

Inside, high ceilings, abundant daylight, and an under-floor ventilation system create a healthy environment. Views were optimized by cantilevering the floor slabs, making way for unbroken expanses of glass on the perimeter. Operable windows provide access to fresh air and let in the sounds of the birds who live in the High Line’s birch thicket just outside.


510 will seek a LEED Platinum rating, banking not just on the energy saving measures of its high-performance envelope and efficient mechanical systems, but on the strides it takes in establishing an environment conducive to the health and well-being of its human inhabitants...

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Luxury Apartment Living Goes Green...

Luxury Apartment Living Goes Green... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
In urban areas across the country, young professionals are clamoring for close-in, transit-oriented apartments that are as high-performance as they are luxurious.

In fact, nearly one-fifth of them will pay more for a green residence, according to a recent survey, and developers are responding with posh rental communities that encompass energy efficiency, healthy indoor air, and a walkable lifestyle.

Visit the link for six recently completed projects that provide sustainable, stylish multifamily living...

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Oloron Saint Marie Multimedia Center & Urban Regeneration

Oloron Saint Marie Multimedia Center & Urban Regeneration | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Part of an ambitious urban regeneration project on land that used to be defined by hydroelectric-powered textile industries, the new Oloron Saint Marie Multimedia Center displays its bold architecture in the town of Oloron-Sainte-Marie, France.

French architectural firm Pascale Guédot, in collaboration with Michel Corajoud, took this first step in re-imagining this abandoned beret factory into a wonderful media center built on the existing stone foundation.

The design had to capture the natural beauty in the architecture, so the architects designed the 2,700 square meter building as a main wood latticed volume floating on top of a glass level below. This beautifully modern multimedia center was linked to the opposite banks via two walkways uniting in a 1,255 square meter public concourse and creating a necessary connection between river banks. A 44 car parking space ensures visitors are carefree when walking through the Oloron Saint Marie Multimedia Center’s glass entrance...

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Lijbers Architects: Biodiversity in the Netherlands

Lijbers Architects: Biodiversity in the Netherlands | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Amsterdam-based studio Lijbers Architects have created 'Biodiversity', an urban planning proposal sited within the Netherlands, which addresses the overall decline of natural environments due to rapid development by humans. Biodiversity of plants and animals have reduced significantly as a direct result of the human need to consume space and raw materials, initiating this design to revert these trends and reclaim as much as possible before it is gone entirely. This initiative is to place frameworks upon existing structures, creating additional surface area to plant and grow flora & fauna.

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NYC's High Line: round 3

NYC's High Line: round 3 | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

As one of the most well-known and popular urban revitalization projects in recent memory, New York's High Line has proven the effectiveness and impact of adaptive reuse and urban green space...

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Sweden building major urban greenhouse for vertical gardens

Sweden building major urban greenhouse for vertical gardens | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Swedish firm Plantagon has broken ground on a large urban greenhouse, its first major foray into vertical agriculture.

Plantagon, a Stockholm-based firm developing urban agriculture systems, broke ground earlier this month on a large urban greenhouse that is intended to produce TK much food for the city of Linköping, a city in south-central Sweden.

The building will take around a year and half to build; Platagon plans to use the structure to test vertical farming concepts and to sell fruits and vegetables directly to the people of Linköping, which is home it roughly 100,000 people.

Plantagon hopes the Linköping greenhouse will eventually serve as a showcase for urban agriculture, its calling card. Sweco says the structure will stand roughly 54 meters high.

Linköping’s mayor, Paul Lindvall, said that he’s proud his city has been chosen as the site for the greenhouse and as a testbed for urban agriculture solutions for other cities. Tekniska Verken plans to work closely with Plantagon and Sweco to develop efficient energy systems for the building, as well as ways to capture and process excess waste heat, CO2 and water.

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